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Building knowledge for trade and development

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          Empowering Women-legal Rights and Economic Opportunities in Africa (English)
          Book by World Bank, 2013, 236 pages
          Categories: Trade and Gender

          This book looks at the effect of legal and economic rights on women’s economic opportunities. It examines family, inheritance, and land laws, which often restrict these rights in ways that hurt women, and looks at some labor law issues. In addition, the book provides a series of indicators that show whether a country does or does not provide particular legal provisions.

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          Gender at Work: A Companion to the World Development Report on Jobs (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2013, 91 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies, Trade and Gender

          A companion to the 2013 World Development Report on jobs, Gender at Work finds huge, persistent gender gaps at work around the world. This major new report advances our understanding of key trends, patterns and constraints, and offers innovative, promising approaches to policies and programs that can level the playing field.

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          Global Economic Prospects 2009: Commodities at the Crossroads - Full Report (English)
          Book by World Bank, 2009, 196 pages
          Categories: Commodities, Trade Policy Analysis and Trade Data Sources

          The release of this year's Global Economic Prospects finds the world economy at a crossroads. Markets all over the world are engulfed in a global economic crisis, with stock markets sharply down and volatile, almost all currencies having depreciated substantially against the dollar, and risk premiums on a wide range of debt having increased by 600 or more basis points. Commodity markets too have turned a corner. Following several years of increase, prices have plummeted, and although well above their 1990s levels, they have given up most of the increases of the past 24 months. This year's Global Economic Prospects analyzes the implications of the crisis for low- and middle-income countries, including an in-depth look at long-term prospects for global commodity markets and the policies of both commodity producing and consuming nations. The government responses to the recent price boom are also analyzed in this year's edition. Producing-country governments have been more prudent than during earlier booms, and because they have saved more of their windfall revenues, they are less likely to be forced to cut into spending now that prices have declined. The spike in food prices tipped more people into poverty, which led governments to expand social assistance programs. Ensuring such programs are better targeted toward the needs of the very poor in the future will help improve the capacity of governments to respond effectively the next time there is a crisis.

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          Global Economic Prospects 2009: Commodities at the Crossroads - Overview (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2009, 13 pages
          Categories: Commodities, Trade Policy Analysis and Trade Data Sources

          The release of this year's Global Economic Prospects finds the world economy at a crossroads. Markets all over the world are engulfed in a global economic crisis, with stock markets sharply down and volatile, almost all currencies having depreciated substantially against the dollar, and risk premiums on a wide range of debt having increased by 600 or more basis points. Commodity markets too have turned a corner. Following several years of increase, prices have plummeted, and although well above their 1990s levels, they have given up most of the increases of the past 24 months. This year's Global Economic Prospects analyzes the implications of the crisis for low- and middle-income countries, including an in-depth look at long-term prospects for global commodity markets and the policies of both commodity producing and consuming nations. The government responses to the recent price boom are also analyzed in this year's edition. Producing-country governments have been more prudent than during earlier booms, and because they have saved more of their windfall revenues, they are less likely to be forced to cut into spending now that prices have declined. The spike in food prices tipped more people into poverty, which led governments to expand social assistance programs. Ensuring such programs are better targeted toward the needs of the very poor in the future will help improve the capacity of governments to respond effectively the next time there is a crisis.

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          Global Economic Prospects: Less volatile, but slower growth (English)
          Book by World Bank, 2013, 206 pages
          Categories: Trade Policy Analysis and Trade Data Sources

          The book is organized by topics such as industrial production, inflation, financial markets, trade, and others that give an overview of the world's economy and its main conclusion is that global economy appears to be transitioning toward a period of more stable, but slower growth. It also contains detailed information and figures by region where the figures show that growth is firming in developing countries, but conditions vary widely across economies.

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          Jobs for Shared Prosperity : Time for Action in the Middle East and North Africa (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2013, 350 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies

          This report uses jobs as a lens to weave together the complex dynamics of employment creation, skills supply, and the institutional environment of labor markets and goes beyond the traditional links between jobs, productivity, and living standards to include an understanding of how jobs matter for individual dignity and expectations. It aims to provide an in-depth analysis of the labor markets in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and to identify the barriers to the creation of more and better jobs.

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          The Little Data Book on Information and Communication Technology 2013
          Book by World Bank, 2013, 245 pages
          Categories: Science and Technology

          Like the rest of this series on little data books, it is organized by regional and income group data. It provides data on access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) which have seen tremendous growth. The usage of the internet, mobile phones will continue rising. The number of individuals using the Internet will reach an estimated 2.7 billion while the number of fixed (wired) broadband subscriptions will reach almost 700 million at the end of 2013. This publication is important because investment in information and communication technologies is associated with economic benefits as higher productivity, lower costs, new economic opportunities, job creation, innovation, and increased trade. This publication provides comparable statistics on the sector for 2005 and 2011 across a range of indicators, enabling readers to readily compare economies. Such indicators cover the economic and social context structure of the information and communication technology sector, sector efficiency and capacity, and sector performance related to access, usage, quality, affordability, trade, and applications.

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          The Little Data Book on Private Sector Development 2013 (English)
          Book by World Bank, 2013, 246 pages
          Categories: Enterprise Development

          The book contains reliable cross-country data on private sector development. It is meant to make informed decisions when formulating responses to economic crises. Specially in the case of downturns which affect exports, investment, and growth negatively. It contains data on the investment climate by regions and by income groups. Data from the World Bank Group’s Doing Business project, Enterprise Surveys, Entrepreneurship Snapshots was also included. Some of the indicators included are on the economic and social context such as the investment climate, private sector investment, finance and banking, and infrastructure.

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          The Little Green Data Book 2013
          Book by World Bank, 2013, 250 pages
          Categories: Trade and Environment

          This book contains data related to development and environment. Its main goal is to provide information to countries on the state of their environment and natural resources It contains more than 50 indicators for more than 200 countries critical to the post-2015 development dialogue. The chosen indicators are based on the Millennium Development Goals. Issues currently being discussed for SDGs and cover the three pillars of sustainability (economic, social, and environmental).

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          South Asia Economic Focus, Spring 2013 : Regaining Momentum (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2013, 62 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies

          South Asia is regaining its economic momentum, but the recovery in the world’s region with the largest number of poor people could falter in the absence of a stronger investment climate. This report displays the region's recent economic developments and gives an outlook of South Asia's economic growth while presenting individual country briefs (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka).

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          Tales from the Development Frontier : How China and Other Countries Harness Light Manufacturing to Create Jobs and Prosperity (English)
          Book by World Bank, 2013, 555 pages
          Categories: Competitiveness, Globalization and Development Strategies, Emerging Economies and South South Cooperation

          This work describes how most developing countries have had little success in raising the share of manufacturing in production, employment, or exports. It sheds light on manufacturing clusters in several Asian and African countries and focuses on the six main binding constraints to competitiveness such as availability, cost, and quality of inputs; access to industrial land; access to finance; trade logistics; entrepreneurial capabilities, both technical and managerial; and worker skills. The volume systematically explores potential growth opportunities in industries: agribusiness, apparel, leather goods, wood working, and metal products.

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          World Development Report 2009: Reshaping Economic Geography - Overview (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2008, 32 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies, Trade Policy Analysis and Trade Data Sources

          Places do well when they promote transformations along the dimensions of economic geography: higher densities as cities grow; shorter distances as workers and businesses migrate closer to density; and fewer divisions as nations lower their economic borders and enter world markets to take advantage of scale and trade in specialized products. World Development Report 2009 concludes that the transformations along these three dimensions--density, distance, and division--are essential for development and should be encouraged. The conclusion is controversial. Slum-dwellers now number a billion, but the rush to cities continues. A billion people live in lagging areas of developing nations, remote from globalization's many benefits. And poverty and high mortality persist among the world's "bottom billion," trapped without access to global markets, even as others grow more prosperous and live ever longer lives. Concern for these three intersecting billions often comes with the prescription that growth must be spatially balanced. This report has a different message: economic growth will be unbalanced. To try to spread it out is to discourage it--to fight prosperity, not poverty. But development can still be inclusive, even for people who start their lives distant from dense economic activity. For growth to be rapid and shared, governments must promote economic integration, the pivotal concept, as this report argues, in the policy debates on urbanization, territorial development, and regional integration. Instead, all three debates overemphasize place-based interventions. Reshaping Economic Geography reframes these debates to include all the instruments of integration--spatially blind institutions, spatially connective infrastructure, and spatially targeted interventions. By calibrating the blend of these instruments, today's developers can reshape their economic geography. If they do this well, their growth will still be unbalanced, but their development will be inclusive.

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          World Development Report 2009: Reshaping Economic Geography - Part One (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2008, 149 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies, Trade Policy Analysis and Trade Data Sources

          Places do well when they promote transformations along the dimensions of economic geography: higher densities as cities grow; shorter distances as workers and businesses migrate closer to density; and fewer divisions as nations lower their economic borders and enter world markets to take advantage of scale and trade in specialized products. World Development Report 2009 concludes that the transformations along these three dimensions--density, distance, and division--are essential for development and should be encouraged. The conclusion is controversial. Slum-dwellers now number a billion, but the rush to cities continues. A billion people live in lagging areas of developing nations, remote from globalization's many benefits. And poverty and high mortality persist among the world's "bottom billion," trapped without access to global markets, even as others grow more prosperous and live ever longer lives. Concern for these three intersecting billions often comes with the prescription that growth must be spatially balanced. This report has a different message: economic growth will be unbalanced. To try to spread it out is to discourage it--to fight prosperity, not poverty. But development can still be inclusive, even for people who start their lives distant from dense economic activity. For growth to be rapid and shared, governments must promote economic integration, the pivotal concept, as this report argues, in the policy debates on urbanization, territorial development, and regional integration. Instead, all three debates overemphasize place-based interventions. Reshaping Economic Geography reframes these debates to include all the instruments of integration--spatially blind institutions, spatially connective infrastructure, and spatially targeted interventions. By calibrating the blend of these instruments, today's developers can reshape their economic geography. If they do this well, their growth will still be unbalanced, but their development will be inclusive.

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          World Development Report 2009: Reshaping Economic Geography - Part Two (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2008, 261 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies, Trade Policy Analysis and Trade Data Sources

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          World Development Report 2010: Development and Climate Change
          Report by World Bank, 2010, 444 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies, Trade and Environment

          Today's enormous development challenges are complicated by the reality of climate change—the two are inextricably linked and together demand immediate attention. Climate change threatens all countries, but particularly developing ones. Understanding what climate change means for development policy is the central aim of the World Development Report 2010. It explores how public policy can change to better help people cope with new or worsened risks, how land and water management must adapt to better protect a threatened natural environment while feeding an expanding and more prosperous population, and how energy systems will need to be transformed. The report is an urgent call for action, both for developing countries who are striving to ensure policies are adapted to the realities and dangers of a hotter planet, and for high-income countries who need to undertake ambitious mitigation while supporting developing countries efforts. A climate-smart world is within reach if we act now to tackle the substantial inertia in the climate, in infrastructure, and in behaviors and institutions; if we act together to reconcile needed growth with prudent and affordable development choices; and if we act differently by investing in the needed energy revolution and taking the steps required to adapt to a rapidly changing planet. In the crowded field of climate change reports, WDR 2010 uniquely: emphasizes development, takes an integrated look at adaptation and mitigation, highlights opportunities in the changing competitive landscape and how to seize them, proposes policy solutions grounded in analytic work and in the context of the political economy of reform.

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          The World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2011, 458 pages
          Categories: Trade and Gender

          The report argues that greater gender equality can enhance productivity, improve development outcomes for the next generation, and make institutions more representative. It examines the factors that have fostered change and the constraints that have slowed progress. The analysis focuses on the roles of economic growth, households, markets, and institutions in determining gender differences in education and health, agency, and access to economic opportunities. The report identifies four priority areas for domestic policy action: reducing excess female mortality and closing education gaps; improving access to economic opportunities for women; increasing women's voice and agency in the household and in society and limiting the reproduction of gender inequality across generations.

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          The World Development Report 2013: Jobs (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2012, 422 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies

          The WDR 2013 report analyzes the connection between jobs and economic and social development, and stresses the importance of the private sector in creating jobs. It looks at why some jobs do more for development than others. The Report finds that the jobs with the greatest development payoffs are those that make cities function better, connect the economy to global markets, protect the environment, foster trust and civic engagement, or reduce poverty. The report proposes a three-layered approach to policy which consists of a framework that is conducive to growth, well-designed labor policies and prioritizing jobs that ensure development.

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          The World Development Report 2013: Jobs Overview (English)
          Summary by World Bank, 2012, 64 pages
          Categories: Globalization and Development Strategies

          The WDR 2013 report analyzes the connection between jobs and economic and social development, and stresses the importance of the private sector in creating jobs. It looks at why some jobs do more for development than others. The Report finds that the jobs with the greatest development payoffs are those that make cities function better, connect the economy to global markets, protect the environment, foster trust and civic engagement, or reduce poverty. The report proposes a three-layered approach to policy which consists of a framework that is conducive to growth, well-designed labor policies and prioritizing jobs that ensure development.

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          World Development Report 2014 - Risk and Opportunity: Managing Risk for Development (English)
          Report by World Bank, 2013, 363 pages
          Categories: Macroeconomic Policy

          The WDR 2014 focuses on questions such as the role of the state in helping people manage risks by direct interventions or providing an enabling environment, improving government's risk and introduces mechanisms for risk management.It finds that: Taking on risks is necessary to pursue opportunities for development; to confront risk successfully, it is essential to shift from unplanned and ad hoc responses when crises occur to proactive, systematic, and integrated risk management and that the trade-offs and obstacles to risk management must also be identified, prioritized, and addressed. The report emphasizes that risk management requires shared action and responsibility at different levels of society and governments have a critical role in managing these systemic risks.

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