A partnership with academia

Building knowledge for trade and development

Vi Digital Library - Text Preview

Trade and Development Report 2018 - Power, Platforms and the Free Trade Delusion

Report by UNCTAD, 2018

Download original document (English)

Managing structural transformation is a big challenge at all levels of development. In part, that is because the mixture of creative and destructive forces accompanying such a transformation do not automatically translate into a virtuous growth circle while the rents that are inevitably created in the process can be captured by a privileged group in ways that clog the economic arteries and increase the dangers of a political stroke. There are already signs of this happening with the digital revolution. However, this is not inevitable and if history is any guide, public policy, including industrial policy, can help to manage more inclusive and sustainable outcomes. This set out some elements of that agenda. It has argued that structural transformation will also need to be accompanied by infrastructure planning. It has suggested that the old debate between balanced and unbalanced growth provides a rich discussion for thinking about those techniques, skills and institutional requirements. The bottom line when it comes to infrastructure spending is that it is too important a development matter to be left to the sole responsibility of finance ministries.

TRADE AND
DEVELOPMENT
REPORT 2018


U N I T E D N AT I O N S C O N F E R E N C E O N T R A D E A N D D E V E L O P M E N T


POWER, PLATFORMS AND
THE FREE TRADE DELUSION






UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT


TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT
REPORT 2018
POWER, PLATFORMS AND
THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


Report by the secretariat of the
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development


UNITED NATIONS
New York and Geneva, 2018




Symbols of United Nations documents are
composed of capital letters combined with
figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a 
reference to a United Nations document.


The designations employed and the presentation 
of the material in this publication do not imply
the expression of any opinion whatsoever on
the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations
concerning  the  legal  status  of  any  country, 
territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or 
concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries.


Material  in  this  publication may  be  freely 
quoted  or  reprinted,  but  acknowledgement 
is requested, together with a reference to the 
document number. A copy of the publication 
containing  the  quotation  or  reprint  should 
be  sent  to  the UNCTAD secretariat; e-mail:
gdsinfo@unctad.org.


This publication has been edited externally.


Note


UNCTAD/TDR/2018


UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION


Sales No. E.18.II.D.7


  ISBN 978-92-1-112931-1
  eISBN 978-92-1-047322-4


ISSN 0255-4607


Copyright © United Nations, 2018
All rights reserved




iii


Foreword


The world economy is again under stress. The immediate pressures are building around escalating tariffs and 
volatile financial flows but behind these threats to global stability is a wider failure, since 2008, to address 
the inequities and imbalances of our hyperglobalized world. 


The growing mountain of debt, more than three times the size of global output, is symbolic of that failure. 
While the public sector in advanced economies has been obliged to borrow more since the crisis, it is the 
rapid growth of private  indebtedness, particularly  in  the corporate  sector, which needs  to be monitored 
closely; this has, in the past, been a harbinger of crisis. 


The growing  indebtedness  observed globally  is  closely  linked  to  rising  inequality. The  two have been 
connected by the growing weight and influence of financial markets, a defining feature of hyperglobalization. 
Banks becoming too big to fail came to epitomize the reckless neglect of regulators prior to the crisis. But 
the ability of financial institutions to rig markets has survived the early rush of reform in the aftermath of 
the crisis and efforts are underway to push back even on the limited regulations that have been put in place.


Asymmetric power is not unique to financial markets; the global trade landscape is also dominated by big 
players. The ability of lead firms in global production networks to capture more of the value added has led 
to unequal trading relations even as developing countries have deepened their participation in global trade. 


The digital world has bucked the gloomier post-crisis trend and is opening up new growth opportunities for 
developing countries. But the worrying spirit of monopoly risks distorting outcomes. Getting to grips with 
the policy and regulatory challenges this poses must be an integral part of rebalancing the global economy.


All these old and new pressures are weighing down on multilateralism. In our interdependent world, inward 
looking solutions do not offer a way forward; the challenge is to find ways to make multilateralism work for 
all and for the health of the planet. There is much to be done. 


Mukhisa Kituyi
Secretary-General of UNCTAD






v


Foreword ..................................................................................................................................................... iii
Explanatory notes ........................................................................................................................................x
Abbreviations ..............................................................................................................................................xi
OVERVIEW ......................................................................................................................................... I–XIV


Contents


TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


Chapter I
CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY .................................... 1


A. Making sense of global economic trends ............................................................................................. 1
  1.  The Panglossian disconnect ............................................................................................................... 1
  2.  Asset market surges ........................................................................................................................... 2
  3.  Asset markets and income inequality ................................................................................................ 3
  4.  Volatile capital flows ......................................................................................................................... 5
  5.  The global explosion of debt ............................................................................................................. 5


B. Emerging policy challenges .................................................................................................................. 7
  1.  The oil price hike ............................................................................................................................... 8
  2.  United States protectionism and potential trade wars ....................................................................... 8


C. Global trade patterns ........................................................................................................................... 9
  1.  Signals from global trade ................................................................................................................... 9
  2.  Commercial services trade ............................................................................................................... 10
  3.  Commodity price trends .................................................................................................................. 11


D. The drivers of growth ......................................................................................................................... 13


E. Regional growth trends ...................................................................................................................... 15
  1.  Developed countries ........................................................................................................................ 15
  2.  Transition economies ....................................................................................................................... 17
  3.  Latin America .................................................................................................................................. 18
  4.  West Asia ......................................................................................................................................... 19
  5.  Developing Africa ............................................................................................................................ 20
  6.  Developing Asia .............................................................................................................................. 21
  7.  Growth in an environment of instability .......................................................................................... 22
Notes ........................................................................................................................................................... 24
References .................................................................................................................................................. 25
Appendix I.A: A “trade war” scenario .................................................................................................... 27


Chapter II
THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION .......................... 35


A. Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 35


B. Trade dynamics after the Second World War .................................................................................. 36
  1.  The rise and fall of the Golden Age: 1950–1986 ............................................................................. 36
  2.  Hyperglobalization: 1986–present ................................................................................................... 40
C. Trade-charged structural change: Diverging paths among developing regions ........................... 45




vi


D. Trade and inequality under hyperglobalization .............................................................................. 50
  1.  GVCs, jobs offshoring, processing trade and income polarization in manufacturing ..................... 51
  2.  Concentration in export markets, intangible barriers to competition and corporate rents: 


A look at the top 2,000 TNCs .......................................................................................................... 53
E. Unequalizing trade: Macroeconomic risks and development policy challenges ........................... 59
Notes ........................................................................................................................................................... 61
References .................................................................................................................................................. 64


Chapter III
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD:
PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS ........................................................................... 69


A. Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 69
B. Digital technologies in value chains: Potential opportunities for income generation


and upgrading ..................................................................................................................................... 70
  1.  The distribution of value added and upgrading in traditional value chains ..................................... 70
  2.  Digitalization: Potential impacts on the manufacturing process ..................................................... 72
C. Adapting economic policies to a digital world ................................................................................. 80
  1.  Facilitating integration into a digital economy and ensuring an equitable sharing 


of its benefits .................................................................................................................................... 81
  2.  Trade and investment rules in the digital era ................................................................................... 90
  3.  South–South and triangular cooperation for a digital world ........................................................... 92
D. The way forward for developing countries ....................................................................................... 94
Notes ........................................................................................................................................................... 97
References .................................................................................................................................................. 99


Chapter IV
BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT
AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION ...................................................................................... 103


A. Introduction ....................................................................................................................................... 103
B. Infrastructure matters: Conceptual issues and historical lessons ................................................ 106
  1.  Types of infrastructure ................................................................................................................... 107
  2.  Infrastructure and the virtuous circle of growth ............................................................................ 109
  3.  Historical experiences .................................................................................................................... 112
C. Infrastructure in developing countries ........................................................................................... 115
  1.  Needs and gaps .............................................................................................................................. 115
  2.  The financing gap narrative ........................................................................................................... 118
D. A framework for considering the role of infrastructure in development .................................... 122
  1.  Some basic considerations ............................................................................................................. 122
  2.  The role of planning in infrastructure development ...................................................................... 123
  3.  Experiences with national development plans: Country evidence ................................................ 125
E. Conclusion ......................................................................................................................................... 126
Notes ......................................................................................................................................................... 127
References ................................................................................................................................................ 128




vii


List of figures


  1.1  G20 real GDP growth rates, first quarter 2009–first quarter 2018 ................................................. 1
  1.2  Stock market, selected developed economies, January 1990–March 2018 .................................... 3
  1.3  Stock market, selected developed and emerging Asian economies, January 1990–March 2018 ... 3
  1.4  Change in stock market indices, selected economies, 2009–2018 ................................................. 3
  1.5  United States residential property prices, first quarter 2005–fourth quarter 2017 ......................... 4
  1.6  Euro area residential property prices, first quarter 2005–fourth quarter 2017 ............................... 4
  1.7  Residential property prices, selected European economies, first quarter 


2005–fourth quarter 2017 ............................................................................................................... 4
  1.8  Stock market appreciation and nominal wages increase, selected economies, 2009–2015 ........... 4
  1.9  Net private capital flow by region, first quarter 2007–fourth quarter 2017 .................................... 5
  1.10  World trade volume trends, January 2008–April 2018 ................................................................. 10
  1.11  Monthly commodity price indices by commodity group, January 2002–May 2018 ................... 12
  1.12  United States private-sector nominal average hourly earnings, 2007–2018 ................................ 16
  1A.1  Labour income share and consumption in countries involved in the trade war, 2003–2023 ....... 29
  1A.2  External income and transfers, and the current account in countries involved 


in the trade war, 2015–2023 ......................................................................................................... 31
  1A.3  Growth of GDP and investment, 2015–2023 ............................................................................... 33
  1A.4  World gross product and trade volume growth rates, 1990–2023 ................................................ 34
  2.1  World trade, global output and related elasticities, selected country groups and periods, 


1870–2016 .................................................................................................................................... 37
  2.2  Share in global merchandise exports, 1948–2017 ........................................................................ 37
  2.3  Developing economies’ share of trade by weight, 1970–2016 ..................................................... 37
  2.B1.1  Income of the United States on direct investment abroad, selected countries, 


first quarter 2000 to first quarter 2018 .......................................................................................... 39
  2.4  Total gross exports, selected country groups and China, 1948–2016 .......................................... 41
  2.B2.1  Trade and investment bilateral connections based on international agreements, 1960–2015 ...... 42
  2.B2.2 WTO-plus and WTO-extra policy areas included in trade agreements ........................................ 43
  2.5  Global network of merchandise trade, selected years, 1986–2016 .............................................. 44
  2.6  Share of BRICS versus RIBS in world economy, 1990–2016 ..................................................... 45
  2.7  World trade in value added by sectors, selected country groups, 1995–2011 .............................. 46
  2.8  Export structure by technological levels, selected developing regions, 1990–2016 .................... 48
  2.9  Export structure by technological levels and selected partners, selected developing 


regions, 1990–2016 ...................................................................................................................... 49
  2.10  Average shares of top 1 per cent, 5 per cent and 25 per cent exporters in country 


total export, 1997–2014 ................................................................................................................ 53
  2.11  Export market entrant survival rate in 2010 ................................................................................. 54
  2.12  Payments and receipts related to the use of foreign IPR, selected country groups, 


1995–2015 .................................................................................................................................... 55
  2.13  Top 2,000 TNCs revenues and world trade, 1995–2015 .............................................................. 56


Figure




viii


2.14  Top 2,000 TNCs profit and the global labour income share, 1995–2015 ..................................... 57
  2.B3.1  Shares in top 2,000 TNCs profits, selected countries and country groups, 1995–2015 ............... 58
  3.1  Stylized manufacturing value chain smile curve .......................................................................... 72
  3.2  Selected ICT services as a share of total intermediate consumption in manufacturing, 


selected economies, 2000–2014 ................................................................................................... 74
  3.3  Domestic value added shares in manufactured products finalized in an economy, 


selected economies, 2000 and 2014 ............................................................................................. 77
  3.4  Types of digital platforms ............................................................................................................. 78
  3.5  Geographic location of big tech companies, selected companies ................................................ 79
  3.6  Share of “big tech companies” in top 100 non-financial corporations ......................................... 80
  3.7  Shares of top 1 per cent companies from technology, software and IT-services sector, 


1996–2015 .................................................................................................................................... 80
  3.8  Active mobile-broadband subscriptions, 2007–2017 ................................................................... 82
  3.9  Mobile-broadband prices, 2013 and 2016 .................................................................................... 82
  3.10  Individuals using the Internet, 2005–2017 ................................................................................... 82
  4.1  Multilateral development banks: Finance for infrastructure as proportion of total 


banks’ finance ............................................................................................................................. 105
  4.2  Number of electrical outages in a typical month .........................................................................111
  4.3  Current infrastructure investment, selected subregions and economies ..................................... 116
  4.4  Paved road density ...................................................................................................................... 117
  4.5  Logistics performance index, 2016 ............................................................................................ 117
  4.6  Energy access, 2016 ................................................................................................................... 117
  4.7  Telephone access and use, 2016 ................................................................................................. 118
  4.8  Safely managed water supply access, 2015 ................................................................................ 118
  4.9  Sanitation facilities access, 2015 ................................................................................................ 118
  4.10  Trends in public investment, 1980–2015 ................................................................................... 120
  4.11  Infrastructure planning: Country evidence ................................................................................. 125


Figure




ix


List of tables and boxes


Table


Box


1.1  Global scenarios: From toiling to troubling ................................................................................. 23
2.1  Measurement challenges in mapping international “trade” .......................................................... 38
2.2  Using laws not wisely but too well: The international legal framework in the era of GVCs ....... 42
2.3  “There’s no place like home”: The geographical location of headquarters of the top TNCs ....... 58
3.1  The Data Revolution Policy of Rwanda ....................................................................................... 90
4.1 What do empirical studies tell us? .............................................................................................. 104
4.2  Balanced versus unbalanced growth .......................................................................................... 110


1.1 Completed and pending mergers and acquisitions deals worldwide, 2016–2018  ......................... 6
1.2  World primary commodity prices, 2008–2018 ............................................................................. 11
1.3  Drivers of demand in different countries, 2017–2018 .................................................................. 14
1.4  World output growth, 1991–2018 ................................................................................................. 17
  1A.1  Outcomes for countries / other groups .......................................................................................... 32
  1A.2 World variables ............................................................................................................................. 34
  2.1  Value added shares in gross exports of developing economies, level and changes, 


1995–2014 .................................................................................................................................... 47
  2.2  Shares in exported value added in manufacturing GVCs, 2000–2014 ......................................... 51
  2.3  Top 2,000 TNCs – key indicators, 1996–2015 ............................................................................. 56
  3.1  Digital technologies ...................................................................................................................... 71
  4.1  The role of infrastructure in industrialization of the Republic of Korea .................................... 114
  4.2  Infrastructure investment needs at the global level, annual 2015/16–2030 ............................... 115




x


Explanatory notes


Classification by country or commodity group


The  classification  of  countries  in  this Report has been adopted solely for the purposes of statistical or
analytical convenience and does not necessarily imply any judgement concerning the stage of development 
of a particular country or area. 


There  is  no  established  convention  for  the  designation  of  “developing”,  “transition”  and  “developed” 
countries or areas in the United Nations system. This Report  follows the classification as defined in the 
UNCTAD Handbook of Statistics 2017 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.17.II.D.7) for these three 
major country groupings (see http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/tdstat42_en.pdf).


For statistical purposes, regional groupings and classifications by commodity group used in this Report follow
generally those employed in the UNCTAD Handbook of Statistics 2017 unless otherwise stated. The data 
for China do not include those for Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong SAR), Macao 
Special Administrative Region (Macao SAR) and Taiwan Province of China.


The terms “country” / “economy” refer, as appropriate, also to territories or areas.


References to “Latin America” in the text or tables include the Caribbean countries unless otherwise indicated.


References to “sub-Saharan Africa” in the text or tables include South Africa unless otherwise indicated.


Other notes


References in the text to TDR are to the Trade and Development Report (of a particular year). For example, 
TDR 2017 refers to Trade and Development Report 2017 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.17.II.D.5). 


References  in  the  text  to  the United States are  to  the United States of America and  those  to  the United 
Kingdom are to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 


The term “dollar” ($) refers to United States dollars, unless otherwise stated.


The term “billion” signifies 1,000 million.


The term “tons” refers to metric tons.


Annual rates of growth and change refer to compound rates.


Exports are valued FOB and imports CIF, unless otherwise specified.


Use of a dash (–) between dates representing years, e.g. 2015–2017, signifies the full period involved, 
including the initial and final years.


An oblique stroke (/) between two years, e.g. 2016/17, signifies a fiscal or crop year.


A dot (.) in a table indicates that the item is not applicable.


Two dots (..) in a table indicate that the data are not available, or are not separately reported.


A dash (–) or a zero (0) in a table indicates that the amount is nil or negligible.


Decimals and percentages do not necessarily add up to totals because of rounding.




xi


Abbreviations


AI  artificial intelligence


BIT bilateral investment treaty
CAD  computer-aided design


CIS Commonwealth of Independent States
EPZ  export processing zone 


EU-19  European Union (19 members of the eurozone)


EU-27  European Union 2007–2013 (27 countries)


FDI  foreign direct investment


FTA  free trade agreement


G20  Group of Twenty


GDP  gross domestic product


GFC  global financial crisis


GVC  global value chain


ICT  information and communication technology
IMF  International Monetary Fund


IoT  Internet of Things
IPR  intellectual property rights


LAC  Latin America and the Caribbean


LDCs least developed countries
M&A  mergers and acquisitions


NAFTA  North American Free Trade Agreement


NCE New Climate Economy
NIE  newly industrializing economy
OECD  Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development


OPEC  Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries


R&D research and development
SaaS software as a service
TDR  Trade and Development Report


TiVA  OECD-WTO Trade in Value-Added initiative


TNC transnational corporation
UNCTAD  United Nations Conference on Trade and Development


WIOD  World Input–Output Database


WTO  World Trade Organization






I


OVERVIEW


Technological changes are having a profound impact on the way we go about our daily lives.
Digital innovations have already changed the way we earn, learn, shop and play. Collectively, as
a fourth industrial revolution, they are changing the geography of production and the contours of
work. But in the end, social and political actions – in the form of rules, norms and policies – will
determine how the future unfolds.


In this respect, the digital revolution has the misfortune of unfolding in a neo-liberal era. Over the
last four decades, a mixture of financial chicanery, unrestrained corporate power and economic
austerity has shredded the social contract that emerged after the Second World War and replaced it
with a different set of rules, norms and policies, at the national, regional and international levels.
This has enabled capital – whether tangible or intangible, long-term or short-term, industrial
or financial – to escape from regulatory oversight, expand into new areas of profit-making and
restrict the influence of policymakers over how business is done.


This agenda has co-opted a vision of an interconnected digital world, free from artificial boundaries
to the flow of information, lending a sense of technological euphoria to a belief in its own
inevitability and immutability. Big business has responded by turning the mining and processing
of data into a rent-seeking cornucopia.


Recent events – beginning with the financial crisis, through the sluggish recovery that has followed,
to the fake news and data privacy scandals now grabbing headlines – have forced policymakers
to face the inequities and imbalances produced by this agenda. Governments have begun to
acknowledge the need to fill regulatory deficits that harm the public, to provide stronger safety
nets for those adversely affected by technological progress and to invest in the skills needed for
a twenty-first century workforce. But so far, actions have spoken more softly than words.


Despite the talk, this is neither a brave nor a new world. The globalization era before 1914
was also one of dramatic technological changes as telegraph cables, railroads and steamships
speeded up and shrank the world; it was also a world of unchecked monopoly power, financial
speculation, booms and busts, and rising inequality. Mark Twain castigated a “Gilded Age” of
obscene private wealth, endemic political corruption and widespread social squalor; and, not
unlike today’s digital overlords, the railroad entrepreneurs of yesteryear were master manipulators
of financial innovations, pricing techniques and political connections that boosted their profits
even as they harmed business rivals and the public alike.


And much like today, the new communication technologies of the nineteenth century helped capital
to reconfigure the global economy. Many commentators wistfully describe this as a “free trade”
era, evoking David Ricardo’s idea of comparative advantage to suggest that even technological
laggards were better off specializing in what they did best and opening up to international trade.
Here was a comforting win–win narrative for a winner-takes-most world, and an article of faith
for the globalist cause, which led John Maynard Keynes, in his General Theory, to draw parallels
with the Holy Inquisition.


In reality, international trade in the late nineteenth century was managed through an unholy
mixture of colonial controls in the periphery and rising tariffs in the emerging core, often, as in
the case of the United States, pushed to very high levels. But like today, talk of free trade provided




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


II


a useful cover for the unhindered movement of capital and an accompanying set of rules – the
gold standard, repressive labour laws, balanced budgets – that disciplined government spending
and kept the costs of doing business in check.


As the growing imbalances and tensions of contemporary globalization play out in an increasingly
financialized and digitalized world, the multilateral trading system is being stretched to its limit.
Uncomfortable parallels with the 1930s have been quickly drawn. But if there is one lesson to
take from the interwar years, it is that talking up free trade against a backdrop of austerity and
widespread political mistrust will not hold the centre as things fall apart. And simply pledging to
leave no one behind while appealing to the goodwill of corporations or the better angels of the
super-rich are, at best, hopeful pleas for a more civic world and, at worst, wilful attempts to deflect
from serious discussion of the real factors driving growing inequality, indebtedness and insecurity.


The response cannot be to retreat into some mythical vision of national exceptionalism, or to sit
back and hope that a wave of digital exuberance will wash these problems away. There is, rather,
an urgent need to rethink the multilateral system, if the digital age is to deliver on its promise.


In the absence of a progressive narrative and bold leadership, it is no surprise that the interregnum,
as Antonio Gramsci would have predicted, is exhibiting disturbing signs of political morbidity.
Finding the right narrative will be no easy task. For the moment, we might do best to recall the
words of Mary Shelley – whose monstrous creation, Frankenstein, celebrating 200 years this year,
has lost none of its power to evoke our fear of and fascination with technological progress – “the
beginning is always today”.


Pricking thumbs: Where is the global economy heading?


Ten years ago, in September 2008, Lehman Brothers declared bankruptcy. Suddenly, no one was quite sure 
who owed what to whom, who had risked too much and couldn’t pay back, or who would go down next; 
interbank credit markets froze; Wall Street panicked; businesses went under, not just in the United States 
but across the world; politicians struggled for responses; and economic pundits were left wondering whether 
the Great Moderation was turning in to another Great Depression.


What is surprising, with hindsight, is the complacency in the run-up to the crisis. What is more surprising still 
is just how little has changed in its aftermath. The financial system, we are told, is simpler, safer and fairer. 
But banks have grown even bigger on the back of public money; opaque financial instruments are again 
de rigueur; shadow banking has grown into a $160 trillion business, twice the size of the global economy; 
over-the-counter derivatives have surpassed the $500 trillion figure; and (little surprise) bonus pools for 
bankers are overflowing once again. 


On the back of trillions of dollars of publicly generated liquidity (“quantitative easing”), asset markets have 
rebounded, companies are merging on a mega scale and buying back shares has become the measure of 
managerial acumen. By contrast, the real economy has spluttered along through ephemeral bouts of optimism 
and intermittent talk of downside risk. While some countries have turned to asset markets to boost incomes, 
others have looked to export markets – but neither option has delivered growth on a sustained basis, and 
both have driven inequality even higher.


Arguably the greatest damage of all has been dwindling trust in the system. Here economists have no excuses, 
at least if they have bothered to read Adam Smith. In any system claiming to play by rules, perceptions of 
rigging are guaranteed eventually to undermine its legitimacy. The sense that those who caused the crisis 
not only got away with it but profited from it has been a lingering source of discontent since 2008; and that 
distrust has now infected the political institutions that tie citizens, communities and countries together, at 
the national, regional and international levels. 


The paradox of twenty-first century globalization is that – despite an endless stream of talk about its flexibility, 
efficiency and competitiveness – advanced and developing economies are becoming increasingly brittle, 




OVERVIEW


III


sluggish and fractured. As inequality continues to rise and indebtedness mounts, with financial chicanery 
back in the economic driving seat and political systems drained of trust, what could possibly go wrong?


At  some point  in  the  past  year,  the mood music  around  the  global  economy  changed. The  perception 
of  synchronized  upswings  across many  different  economies,  developed  and  developing,  suggested  a 
positive prognosis for future growth. Upbeat forecasts of economic recovery have led central bankers and 
macroeconomic policymakers in advanced economies to accept that the time has come to reverse the easy 
money policies in place for the past decade. 


The optimism hasn’t lasted very long. Recent growth estimates have been lower than forecast and show 
some deceleration. Eurozone growth in the first quarter of 2018 is estimated to have decelerated relative 
to the previous quarter, and is now the slowest rate since the third quarter of 2016; in the United States, 
the annualized gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate for the first quarter has been revised downward, 
from 2.3 per cent to 2.0 per cent, significantly lower than the previous three quarters; and growth in the first 
quarter in Japan turned negative. 


Developing economies are holding out better, with first quarter growth for 2018 beating expectations in China 
and India, but no improvement and even deceleration in Brazil and South Africa. The Russian Federation, 
like many other oil exporters, has seen the benefits of higher prices. Indeed, commodity exporting regions 
are generally enjoying the recovery in prices, albeit with some recent signs of a slowdown. 


Overall, regional growth forecasts for this year are still on track. However, the number of countries appearing 
to be in some kind of financial stress has increased and forecasts for the medium term are being revised 
downwards. Already, as the talk of monetary policy normalization grows louder, a number of developing 
countries are struggling to cope with capital flow reversals, currency depreciation and associated instability. 


The core concern is the continued strong dependence of tepid global growth on debt, in a context of shifting 
macroeconomic trends. By early 2018, global debt stocks had risen to nearly $250 trillion –three times global 
income – from $142 trillion a decade earlier. UNCTAD’s most recent estimate is that the ratio of global debt 
to GDP is now nearly one third higher than in 2008. 


Private debt has exploded, especially in emerging markets and developing countries, whose share of global 
debt stock increased from 7 per cent in 2007 to 26 per cent in 2017, while the ratio of credit to non-financial 
corporations to GDP in emerging market economies increased from 56 per cent in 2008 to 105 per cent in 2017. 


Vulnerability is reflected in cross-border capital flows, which have not just become more volatile but turned 
negative for emerging and developing countries as a group since late 2014, with outflows especially large 
in the second quarter of 2018


Clearly, markets turned unstable as soon as the central banks in advanced economies announced their intention 
to draw back on the monetary lever. This leaves the global economy on a policy tightrope: reversing the past 
loose monetary policy (in the absence of countervailing fiscal policy) could abort the halting global recovery; 
but not doing so simply kicks the policy risks down the road while fuelling further uncertainty and instability.


What is more, the implications of monetary policy tightening, whether now or later, could be severe because 
of the various asset bubbles that have emerged, even as the chances of global contagion from problems in 
any one region or segment now seem greater  than ever. The synchronized movement of equity markets 
across the globe is one indicator of this. While property price movements in different countries have been 
less synchronized, they have also turned buoyant once again after some years of decline or stagnation after 
the Great Recession. 


The cheap liquidity made available in developed country markets led to overheating in asset markets in both 
advanced and developing economies, as investors engaged in various forms of carry trade. The impact of 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


IV


the liquidity surge on equity markets has been marked, as valuations have touched levels not warranted by 
potential earnings. This has resulted in a fundamental disconnect between asset prices and real economic 
forces. With no support from fiscal policy, monetary measures failed to spur robust recovery of the real 
economy. While asset prices have exploded to unsustainable levels, nominal wages increased by much less, 
and stagnated in many countries. This has led to further increases in income inequality, which implied that 
sluggish household demand could only be boosted through renewed debt bubbles. 


Meanwhile, debt expansion has not financed increased new investment. In advanced economies, the investment 
ratio dropped from 23 per cent on average in 2008 to 21 per cent in 2017. Even in emerging markets and 
developing countries, the ratio of investment to GDP was 32.3 per cent in 2017, only marginally higher 
than the 30.4 per cent achieved in the crisis year 2008, with some larger economies registering a drop over 
this period.


The policy dilemma is made more difficult by other “known unknowns”: uncertainties about the movement 
of oil prices that also reflect geopolitical dynamics, and the possible trajectories and implications of trade 
wars that could result from the current muscle-flexing in the United States and its major trading partners. 
Trade picked up steam last year following several years of very sluggish growth and will likely continue to 
do so this year; but bets are off for what might happen beyond that.


In the absence of strong global demand, trade is unlikely to act as an independent engine of global growth. 
That said, a sharp escalation of tariffs and heightened talk of a trade war will only add to the underlying 
weakness in the global economy. Because tariffs operate in the first place by redistributing income among 
several actors, gauging their impact is not as straightforward as some of the more apocalyptic trade pundits 
are predicting. Still, they will almost certainly not have the desired effect of reducing the current account 
deficit in the United States; will raise uncertainty if tit-for-tat responses ensue; and will cause significant 
collateral damage for some developing countries, adding to the pressures already building from financial 
instability. 


This is not, however, the start of the unravelling of the “post-war liberal order”. That order has been eroded 
over the past 30 years by the rise of footloose capital, the abandonment of full employment policies, the 
steady decline of income going to labour, the erosion of social spending and the intertwining of corporate 
and political power. Trade wars are a symptom of an unbalanced hyperglobalized world. 


Nor is the rise of emerging economies the source of problems. China’s determination to assert its right to 
development has been greeted with a sense of anxiety, if not hostility, in many Western capitals, despite 
it adopting policies that have been part of the standard economic playbook used in these same countries 
as they climbed the development ladder. Indeed, China’s success is exactly what  those who gathered in 
Havana back in 1947 to design an International Trade Organization wanted and sought to encourage. The 
difference in discourse between then and now speaks to how far the current multilateral order has moved 
from its original intent. 


The wretched spirit of monopoly


As discussed in last year’s Trade and Development Report, increased market concentration and rising markups 
have become commonplace across many sectors and economies, with rent-seeking behaviour dominating at 
the top of the corporate food chain. These trends have inevitably extended across borders. 


International trade has always been dominated by big firms. However, in the decades following the end of the 
Second World War, markets remained contested, as new entrants emerged and as countervailing bargaining 
power in the workplace, along with effective State regulations, constrained the power and reach of large 
corporations. Many of those constraints have been eroded in the era of hyperglobalization, even as more 
markets were opened up for business. 




OVERVIEW


V


The resulting expansion of trade has been closely tied to the spread of global value chains (GVCs) governed by 
lead firms, principally headquartered in advanced economies. These have allowed more developing countries 
to participate in the international division of labour by providing specific links in these chains, drawing on 
their abundance of unskilled labour. The promise was that such fledgling manufacturing activities, through 
a mixture of upgrading and spillover effects, would quickly establish robust and inclusive growth paths 
aligned to their comparative advantage. Things have not turned out quite so simply. 


The World Input–Output Database makes it possible to assess changes in the cross-country distribution of 
value added in manufactured output. The domestic share in this can be disaggregated into the shares received 
by management, marketing, research and development, and fabrication (or actual production), taking the 
capital share as a residual. From 2000 to 2014, both the domestic share of total value added and the domestic 
share of labour income in total value added declined in most countries, with the significant exception of 
China. The evidence for the domestic part of the capital share is more mixed; it increased sizeably in the 
United States and to a lesser extent in Mexico, while it declined in Brazil and China. However, the capital 
share is affected by transfer pricing and related practices, which cause returns on capital to show up in low-
tax jurisdictions rather than the country where such returns originate.


The domestic share of fabrication declined in all countries other than Canada and China (in which country the
share increased to 30 per cent in 2014). The picture for management and marketing activities is mixed, but 
the domestic share of research and development activities in total value added increased in most developed
economies, particularly in Japan. There was also an increase in this share (from relatively low levels) in a 
range of developing economies, notably Brazil, China, Indonesia, Mexico, the Republic of Korea and Taiwan 
Province of China. Nevertheless, developed economies still recorded the highest levels of domestic shares 
of research and development activities in total value added.


One  important  factor  behind  these  distributional  trends  has  been  the  increased  bargaining  power  of 
corporations, in part due to extremely concentrated export markets. Recent evidence from firm-level data 
on non-oil merchandise exports shows that, within the restricted circle of exporting firms, the top 1 per cent 
accounted for 57 per cent of country exports on average in 2014. The distribution of exports is thus highly 
skewed in favour of the largest firms. The concentration is even more extreme at the top of the distribution 
and  increased  further under hyperglobalization. After  the global financial  crisis,  the 5  largest  exporting 
firms, on average, accounted for 30 per cent of a country’s total exports, and the 10 largest exporting firms 
for 42 per cent. This sheer size reinforced the gradual dilution of social and political accountability of large 
corporations to national constituencies and labour around the world.


In  developing  countries,  the  adverse  impact  of  international  trade  on  inequality  has  also  resulted  from 
the  proliferation  of  special  processing  trade  regimes  and  export-processing  zones, which  subsidize  the 
organization of low-cost and low-productivity assembly work by the lead firms in control of GVCs, with 
limited benefits  for  the broader economy. The mixed outcomes of policies  to promote processing  trade 
often reflect the strategies of transnational corporations to capture value in GVCs that are designed on their 
own terms, with high value-added inputs and protected intellectual property content sold at high prices to 
processing exporters, and the actual production in developing countries accounting for only a tiny fraction 
of the value of exported final goods.


This raises questions about the strong bets made in many developing economies on the spillovers expected 
from processing trade, because unless developing countries manage to capture part of the surplus created 
by these GVCs and reinvest it in productive capacities and infrastructure, immediate gains in output and 
employment are unlikely to translate into a dynamic move up the development ladder.


China’s particular success in using GVCs has crucially relied on its capacity to claim and use policy space to 
actively leverage trade through targeted industrial and other policies aiming at raising domestic value added 
in manufacturing exports. It has also relied on the ability of the Chinese authorities to develop independent 
financing mechanisms and acquire control over foreign assets, which are now being perceived by developed 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


VI


countries as a threat to their own business interests. Replicating these measures, however, is proving difficult 
elsewhere.


Along with the rise of export market concentration, large firms have increased their ability to extract rents 
from newer and more intangible barriers to competition, reflected in heightened protection for intellectual 
property rights and abilities to exploit national rules and regulations for profit shifting and tax avoidance 
purposes. The consequent increase in returns from monopolies generated by IPRs, as well as reduction in 
relative tax costs of larger companies, creates an uneven playing field. The empirical exercises carried out 
for this Report suggest that the surge in the profitability of top transnational corporations – a proxy for the 
very large firms dominating international trade and finance – together with their growing concentration, has 
acted as a major force pushing down the global labour income share, thus exacerbating personal income 
inequality.


The increase in profits of large “superstar” firms has been a major driver of global functional inequality, 
widening the gap between a small number of big winners and a large collection of smaller companies and 
workers that are being squeezed.


Given  this winner-takes-most world,  a  key question  is whether  the  spread of  digital  technologies  risks 
further concentrating the benefits among a small number of first movers, both across and within countries, 
or whether it will operate to disrupt the status quo and promote greater inclusion. 


All companies, if they are to enjoy efficiency gains and take innovative steps, should be able to collect and 
analyse the full range of data on the markets and cost conditions under which they operate. Lack of such 
information and the skills to manage it have long been seen as a constraint on the growth of most firms in 
developing countries, as well as on smaller firms in advanced economies.


The good news for developing countries is that data intelligence, created by the use of algorithms on big 
data, can help firms (both in the digital sector and beyond) to develop unique products and services, extend 
and coordinate complex supply chains, and underpin the world of algorithmic decision-making. Engaging 
in  digital  trade  could  be  a  promising first  step,  by  encouraging  the  provision  of  hard  and  soft  digital 
infrastructure, which is a basic requirement for people and enterprises to engage successfully in the digital 
economy. Anecdotal success stories point to firms from the South exploiting digital technologies to move 
in to pre- and post-production tasks in the value chain where value added is greatest. Significantly, China’s 
ambitious new industrial strategy aims to make this an economy-wide goal by 2025. 


The bad news comes from trends pointing in a different direction. The widening gaps across firms have 
been particularly marked in the digital world. Of the top 25 big tech firms (in terms of market capitalization) 
14 are based in the United States, 3 in the European Union, 3 in China, 4 in other Asian countries and 1 in 
Africa. The top three big tech firms in the United States have an average market capitalization of more than 
$400 billion, compared with an average of $200 billion in the top big tech firms in China, $123 billion in Asia, 
$69 billion in Europe and $66 billion in Africa. What has been significant is the pace at which the benefits of 
market dominance have accrued in this sector: Amazon’s profits-to-sales ratio increased from 10 per cent in 
2005 to 23 per cent in 2015, while that for Alibaba increased from 10 per cent in 2011 to 32 per cent in 2015. 


The size of these gaps and the speed with which they have opened up are, in large part, due to the extraction, 
processing and sale of data. Data, like ideas and knowledge more generally, and unlike most physical goods 
and services, if easily available, can be used simultaneously by multiple users. The challenge for business 
is twofold: to convert a seemingly abundant resource into a scarce asset and to realize the scale economies 
associated with network effects; if firms can achieve both, the returns appear to be limitless. 


One way in which digitization is profoundly impacting distribution is through the emergence of platform 
monopolies. Using a combination of strengthened property rights, first-mover advantages, market power 
and other uncompetitive practices, these platforms control and use digitized data to organize and mediate 




OVERVIEW


VII


transactions between the various actors, and have the capability of expanding the size of such ecosystems 
in a circular, feedback-driven process.


The trend towards greater concentration, in both the digital and analogue worlds of business, poses several 
macroeconomic  risks and development challenges, which are  starkly evident  today. One concern  is  the 
negative  impact  that  trade  under  hyperglobalization  can have on  aggregate  demand,  as  it  helps  capital 
to progressively acquire a larger share of world income at the expense of labour. Many economists have 
noted that rising inequality, together with the higher propensity to save of the rich, creates a bias towards 
underconsumption or, alternatively, has encouraged debt-led consumption enabled by financial deregulation. 
Both of these processes tend to end badly. 


Since the financial crisis, financial markets and major transnational financial institutions have, with some 
justification, become the principal villains in this story – but it is now evident that non-financial corporations 
cannot  remain  immune from criticism. Facing weaker prospective sales  in a context of weak aggregate 
demand that has been compounded by the post-crisis  turn  to austerity,  large corporations have cut back 
on investment, further depressing aggregate demand and contributing to slower trade in recent years. This 
breakdown of the profit investment nexus is one of the factors behind the reported slowdown in productivity 
growth, particularly in advanced economies.


In such an environment, incentives are strong for firms to seek to boost profitability through rent-seeking 
strategies, such as intensifying international competition between workers and between Governments to 
reduce labour and tax costs, crushing or buying up competitors to build up market dominance and increase 
markups, etc. The unfortunate truth is that the attempts of big firms to enhance their own market position 
through such strategies only make the broader economic system more fragile and vulnerable, since together 
they lead to more inequality, underconsumption, debt and, consequently, macroeconomic vulnerability.


One form of rent extraction attracting increasing attention is aggressive tax optimization by locating a firm’s 
tax base in low-tax jurisdictions. The fact that United States companies generate more investment income 
from Luxembourg and Bermuda than from China and Germany is a reflection of corporate fiscal strategy, 
not economic fundamentals. The digital economy may exacerbate tax-base erosion because a multinational 
enterprise whose main assets are intellectual property or data can easily offshore such assets. While the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting initiative has 
taken some useful steps towards safeguarding fiscal revenues, taxing where activities are undertaken rather 
than where firms declare themselves as being headquartered redistributes rents and may be better suited to 
enlarging the tax bases of developing countries.


Bits and bots: Policy challenges in the digital era


Regulating digital super platforms and developing national marketing platforms is essential for developing 
countries to gain from e-commerce. Without this, linking into existing super platforms will only provide 
the companies that run them with more data, strengthening them further and facilitating their greater access 
to domestic markets.


Since Alexander Hamilton first set out his economic strategy for the fledgling United States, it has been 
understood that catching up requires active industrial policies to mobilize domestic resources and channel 
them in a productive direction. This  is no less  true when those resources are data in the form of binary 
digits. Indeed, given the economic power imbalances inherent in the data revolution, it will be even more 
crucial for countries to devise policies to ensure equitable distribution of gains arising from data which are 
generated within national boundaries. 


To develop domestic digital capacities and digital infrastructure, some developing country Governments 
(such as those of Indonesia, the Philippines and Viet Nam) are using localization measures, just as many 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


VIII


developed countries have done in both the earlier and current phases of digitalization. But most developing 
countries do not have such policies, implying that data are owned by those who gather and store it, mainly 
digital super platforms, which then have full exclusive and unlimited rights on it. National data policies 
should be designed to address four core issues: who can own data, how it can be collected, who can use it, 
and under what terms. It should also address the issue of data sovereignty, which relates to which data can 
leave the country and are thereby not governed under domestic law.


For developing countries, moving  towards and benefiting from a digital  future  is obviously contingent 
upon the appropriate physical and digital infrastructure as well as digital capabilities. The challenges faced 
by these countries in ensuring such digital infrastructure are evident from the well-known and still-large 
gaps with developed countries: the active broadband subscription in the developed world (at 97 per cent) 
is more than double that in the developing world (48 per cent); in Africa, only 22 per cent of individuals 
use the Internet, as compared with 80 per cent in Europe. Even an economy such as India, with a more 
sophisticated digital sector, is lagging well behind in terms of Internet bandwidth, connection speed and 
network readiness.


To develop digital capabilities, efforts are needed at various levels: introducing digital education in schools 
and universities; upgrading the digital skills of the existing workforce; running special basic and advanced 
skill development programmes for the youth and older persons, including digital skills training programmes 
in  existing  professional  development  programmes;  and  providing financial  support  to  develop  digital 
entrepreneurship. 


While skills development and infrastructure provision will be necessary, they are not sufficient to ensure 
developmental benefits; a more comprehensive strategy and a much fuller range of policy measures are 
needed. Industrial policies for digitalization should seek to exploit the strong synergies between supply-side 
and demand-side pressures in establishing a “digital virtuous circle” of emerging digital sectors and firms, 
rising investment and innovation, accelerating productivity growth and rising incomes and expanding markets. 
This may require moving towards a more mission-oriented industrial policy in a digital world to counter 
existing market asymmetries. For example, Governments could invest directly in infant digital platforms or 
acquire large equity stakes in them through sovereign digital wealth funds, in order to spread the fruits of 
high productivity growth from technological change more widely.


Mission-oriented industrial policy is also required because of the changed structure of finance for investment 
in the digital economy. Unlike tangible assets, intangible assets – such as data, software, market analysis, 
organizational design, patents, copyrights and the like – tend to be unique or most valuable within narrowly 
defined specific contexts, making them difficult to value as collateral. As a result, supporting investment in 
intangibles may well require an increased role for development banks as sources of finance, or of specialized 
financing vehicles, as well as policy measures designed to strengthen the profit–investment nexus, such as 
changing financial reporting requirements or imposing restrictions on share buybacks and dividend payments 
when investment is low, or preferential fiscal treatment of reinvested profits.


At  the same  time,  the digital economy creates significant new regulatory policy challenges because  the 
network effects and economies of scale associated with digitalization can cause rising inequality and generate 
barriers to market entry. The overwhelming control over digital platforms by a few firms points to the need 
for active consideration of policies to prevent anticompetitive behaviour by such firms, as well as potential 
misuse of data that are collected in the process. 


One way of  addressing  rent-seeking  strategies  in  a  digital world would be  to  break up  the  large firms 
responsible  for market  concentration. An  alternative would  be  to  accept  the  tendency  towards market 
concentration but regulate that tendency with a view to limiting a firm’s ability to exploit its dominance. 
Given that a country’s data may have public utility features, one option could be to regulate large firms as 
public utilities with direct public provision of the digitized services. This means that the digital economy 
would be considered similarly to traditional essential network industries, such as water and energy. 




OVERVIEW


IX


To keep up in the ongoing technological revolution, developing countries are in urgent need of international 
technology  transfers  from  the  developed  countries  and other  developing  countries  that  have been  able 
to  develop  advanced digital  technologies.  International  technology  transfers  have  become much more 
complicated in  the digital economy because technology and data analytics are being equated with  trade 
secrets, and because some binding rules apply to source-code sharing. South–South digital cooperation can 
play an important role in helping developing countries grasp the rising opportunities in the digital world by 
providing mutual support for their digital infrastructure and capabilities.


Still, developing countries will need to preserve, and possibly expand, their available policy space to implement 
an industrialization strategy that should now include digital policies around data localization, management of 
data flows, technology transfers and custom duties on electronic transmissions. Some of the rules in existing 
trade agreements, as well as those under negotiation, restrict the flexibilities of the signatory Governments to 
adopt localization measures. Negotiations for the Trade in Services Agreement include a proposal that, for 
transferring data outside the national boundaries, the operator simply needs to establish a need to transfer data 
offshore “in connection with the conduct of its business”. The Trans-Pacific Partnership document includes 
binding rules on Governments’ ability to restrict the use or location of computing facilities inside national 
boundaries and prohibits Governments from designing policies requiring source-code sharing, except for 
national security reasons. Some of the proposals on e-commerce in the World Trade Organization include 
binding rules on cross-border data transfers and localization restrictions.


The international community is just beginning a dialogue on the required rules and regulations to manage 
all this, and agreement still needs to be reached on which issues relating to the digital economy are in the 
realm of the World Trade Organization and which fall under other international organizations. A premature 
commitment to rules with long-term impacts in this fast-moving area, where influential actors are driven by 
narrow business interests, should be avoided. 


BRICS and mortar


There  is no doubting  that, as  trade has accelerated under hyperglobalization, developing countries have 
captured a growing share of that trade, including by trading more with each other. However, turning these 
trends into a transformative development process has proved elusive across many parts of the South. 


The significant metamorphosis of trade started in the mid-1980s and was particularly strong in East and 
South-East Asia, based on mutually  reinforcing regional dynamics and State-targeted  industrial policies 
that helped build strong links between profit, investment and exports. A rapid pace of domestic investment 
helped to tap both learning and scale economies, sustaining rapid productivity growth, driving the shift from 
resource-based to labour-intensive and subsequently to technology-intensive production and exports, and 
opening up Northern markets to those exports. In the absence of such linkages in other developing regions, 
the export of manufactures has been a poorer predictor of productivity growth during this period.


Over time, a gradual shift within Asia has seen China overtake Japan as the largest exporter from the region in 
2004, and then become the world’s largest exporter in 2007. This story has, somewhat casually, been rolled, 
under the BRICS (Brazil, Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa) acronym, into a wide narrative 
about the rise of large emerging economies. However, while their combined political weight has important 
geostrategic consequences, they are too varied a set of economic experiences to make for a collective economic 
force. Even within this group, China’s experience is extraordinary. The share of BRICS in global output 
increased from 5.4 per cent in 1990 to 22.2 per cent in 2016. But excluding China, the share of “RIBS” in 
global output went up from 3.7 per cent to around 7.4 per cent – an increase, but not a spectacular one. This 
is mirrored in global export shares, where China significantly outpaces the others in the group. Indeed, in 
most of the rest of the developing world, outside East and South-East Asia, export shares remained roughly 
constant and in some cases even declined, other than during the rising phase of the commodity price supercycle, 
when major commodity exporters registered a temporary increase of their market shares.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


X


The growth  acceleration  and  structural  transformation  in East Asia  have  spilled over  to  the  rest  of  the 
developing world, mainly in the form of boosted demand for raw materials. Nevertheless, again with the 
exception of some successful cases in Asia, there has been very little evidence of broad-based trade-induced 
structural change.


This is, in part, a reflection of asymmetric power relations between lead firms and suppliers in manufacturing 
value  chains,  and weak bargaining  positions  for  developing  countries. The  experiences  of Mexico  and 
Central American countries as assembly manufacturers, for example, have been linked to the creation of 
enclave economies, with few domestic linkages and limited, if any, upgrading. The same can be said about 
the electronics and automotive industries in Eastern and Central Europe.


Trade in Value-Added (TiVA) data show that China has been more of an outlier, one of very few countries 
that managed  to  increase  their  shares  of manufacturing domestic  value  added  in  gross  exports  (with  a 
12 percentage point increase between 1995 and 2014). Of 27 other developing countries recorded in TiVA, 
only 6 experienced increases, albeit of much smaller magnitudes. Instead, for many developing countries, trade 
under hyperglobalization strengthened the economic weight of extractive industries; 18 of the 27 developing 
countries experienced increases in shares of extractive industries in export value added. This may partly 
reflect price effects during the commodity boom, but the persistence of such effects over many years has 
strengthened incentives for investment in extractive industries, private and public, resulting in higher volumes, 
which in the long run is likely to have further entrenched dependence on extractive industries, with adverse 
implications for structural change.


Disaggregating developing countries’ exports by the technological intensity of products points to significant 
differences in both structure and dynamics. On the one hand, the first-tier newly industrialized economies 
and China depict clear trends towards technological upgrading. By contrast, Africa and West Asia show 
limited progress as their exports remain extremely concentrated in commodities, with hardly any increase 
in shares of technology-intensive manufactures, regardless of their labour skill levels. Latin America and 
the rest of South, South-East and East Asia fell between these two extremes. In Latin America, the 1990s 
were a period of some structural change with technological upgrading, but this pattern was partly reversed 
during the commodity supercycle. As the commodity price boom receded, Latin America’s trade structure 
returned to its position of the late 1990s, suggesting that technological upgrading has been limited at best. In 
the rest of South, South-East and East Asia, tendencies towards relative technological upgrading appeared 
in export data only in the 2000s, with a shift  towards high-skill  labour and technology-intensive goods. 
However, there is still some way to go to reach even the current structure of China, let alone the first-tier 
newly industrialized economies.


Overall, bilateral trade data suggest that intraregional trade seems to have the greatest potential in terms of 
providing support to move up the ladder, confirming the validity of previous UNCTAD calls for strengthening 
regional trade. By contrast, the expansion of East and South-East Asia has not triggered significant positive 
structural changes in the export structures of other developing regions; rather, it has intensified their role as 
providers of commodities. And with the slowdown of world trade since the global financial crisis, underlying 
structural weaknesses have been revealed in many countries. One of those weaknesses is the lack of a solid 
infrastructure base. 


Whether measured as road density per square kilometre, access to energy, telephone connectivity (essential 
in the new digital era), piped water or basic sanitation facilities, infrastructure bottlenecks are obstacles to 
sustained growth in many developing regions, especially in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. This is, in 
part, a consequence of the neo-liberal turn in development policy that diluted the original goal of multilateral 
finance to fund infrastructure projects: for example, the ratio of infrastructure lending to total loans made by 
the World Bank in the 2000s was down 60 per cent from the figures for the 1960s. Combined with a wider 
policy assault on public investment, many developing countries have been left denuded of the infrastructure 
needed to compete effectively in more open markets. 




OVERVIEW


XI


However, infrastructure has made a comeback in recent years. The United Nations’ ambitious 2030 Agenda 
for Sustainable Development requires big infrastructure projects if it is to stand any chance of success, with 
estimates of annual global investment needs in the range of several trillion dollars. China’s Belt and Road 
Initiative, an estimated trillion-dollar infrastructure package, promises to extend its own investment–export 
model to a global stage. 


But while headline-grabbing figures on the size of the financing gap have no doubt helped to raise awareness 
of the infrastructure challenge, there is a danger of missing the critical role it plays in structural transformation, 
and the importance of complementary policies and institutions in fostering that role. Moreover, if history is 
any guide, the later countries begin their development push, the bigger the resource mobilization challenge 
and the more necessary that infrastructure investments are properly planned and sequenced.


Regardless  of  a  country’s  level  of  development,  infrastructure  represents  a  long-term  investment  in  an 
uncertain future, and – given the significant scale economies, large sunk costs, strong complementarities 
and long gestation periods that tend to be involved – infrastructure planning is, as the American banker Felix 
Rohatyn has dubbed it, a “bold endeavour”. At the same time, these same features make for both “natural 
monopolies” and significant coordination challenges that can generate big returns for private investors, but 
often require public sector involvement if they are to be delivered on the requisite scale and to full effect. 
An unfortunate consequence has been to turn the infrastructure challenge into a political football between 
the “market failure” and “government failure” camps. 


What is needed instead is a paradigm shift that places infrastructure investment squarely in the context of 
structural transformation and provides an alternate perspective on how to plan, execute and coordinate those 
investments, particularly  for developing countries  that  are building  their  industrial  capacities. Doing  so 
means revisiting, and refreshing, an older debate on development planning. In particular, Albert Hirschman’s 
seminal study The Strategy of Economic Development, published 60 years ago, can provide a framework to 
link what was then commonly called “social overhead capital” (public infrastructure) and directly productive 
activities (private investment). 


Hirschman associated planning with a model of “unbalanced growth”, in which productive resources are best 
selectively targeted at sectors with the potential to build backward and forward linkages, thereby revealing 
gaps  and generating price  disruptions which  stimulate  further  rounds  of  private  investment,  promoting 
organizational and other capabilities needed to keep the growth process going and sending the right signals 
to policymakers on where they should focus their infrastructure investments. 


This approach, by tying financial viability to a wider set of developmental criteria, provides an alternative to 
the current fashion for reducing infrastructure planning to a portfolio choice, with a focus on the bankability 
of individual projects and risk-adjusted returns in line with the calculations of private investors. 


Despite the current enthusiasm among policy makers for scaling up private sector involvement in infrastructure 
projects, financial markets in the era of hyperglobalization have avoided such projects in favour of more 
short-term lending and speculative positions in existing assets. Even when private sector participation in 
infrastructure has taken place, it has often pursued short-term financial gains over public service delivery, 
cherry picking projects accordingly and leading to substandard and fragmented infrastructure systems ill-
suited to the promotion of accelerated growth and structural transformation. 


The way forward requires instead a visionary but pragmatic experimen talism. Transformative development 
needs a more strategic approach, in which infrastructure development is planned to promote linkages that 
support  industrial development and diversification. Such planning should pay due consideration  to how 
infrastructure investments are structured, the key feedback loops between infrastructure and productivity 
growth, and the trade-offs involved in the choice of infrastructure. It matters which infrastructure investments 
are  prioritized  and  how  those  priorities  are  reached.  Some  types  of  infrastructure  (such  as  roads  and 
telecommunications) have a greater impact on productivity than others (for example, air transport or sewage). 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


XII


Planning forces policymakers to think about patient capital, since infrastructure investment typically begins 
to have an impact on private sector productivity only after some time and a threshold level of infrastructure
investment has been  reached. This  also means  that Governments need  to be willing  to  take  some  risk; 
successful infrastructure programmes of the past have been as much the product of political ambition as of 
careful public accounting and cold statistical calculations. Finally, network effects of modern infrastructure as 
well as the complementarities between different types of infrastructure are important – energy promotion in 
rural areas will not necessarily lead to higher rates of returns among firms when roads or telecommunications 
are not concomitantly provided. These effects need to be factored into overall planning and coordination 
efforts. 


As such, planning should be seen less as a top-down instruction manual and more as a coordinating umbrella 
embracing a wide range of differing interests and strategic choices, focusing on what sectors to prioritize 
and technologies to adopt, the macro coordination of investment decisions, the amount of resources required 
and how to mobilize them. From this perspective, the comeback of national development plans in many 
developing countries  since  the beginning of  the new millennium is encouraging, even  though an  initial 
assessment of these initiatives suggests a continuing disconnect between infrastructure plans and a country’s 
development strategy. More work is needed to connect a country’s different stakeholders and the policy 
areas with which infrastructure overlaps, with attention to consistency, the development of capacities for 
planning, project preparation and execution, and a clear system of penalties to ensure that plans are followed 
through, as well as accountability to minimize unnecessary costs and ensure legitimacy. Ultimately, this 
requires bold political leadership. 


Free trade troubadours


The growing backlash against hyperglobalization is not a surprise; that the international trading system is 
now on the frontline is more so, given that the roots of the heightened insecurity, indebtedness and inequality 
behind this backlash stem more from the financial system than the trade regime. 


There should be little doubt that using tariffs to mitigate the problems of hyperglobalization will not only 
fail, but also runs the danger of adding to them, through a damaging cycle of retaliatory actions, heightened 
economic uncertainty, added pressure on wage earners and consumers, and eventually slower growth. Still, it 
would be foolish to dismiss those voicing concerns about damaging trade shocks as ignorant of the subtleties 
of Ricardian trade theory or simply the misguided victims of populist politicians. Indeed, while the gravity 
of discontent in the North is only now pulling towards trade issues, there are long-standing concerns among 
developing countries about the workings of the international trading system. 


The dominant narrative of the current era has identified globalization with the growing reach of markets, an 
accelerating pace of technological change and the (welcome) erosion of political boundaries; the language of 
“free trade” has been used incessantly to promote the idea that even as global economic forces have broken 
free from local political oversight, a level playing field, governed through a mixture of formal rules, tacit 
norms and greater competition, will guarantee prosperity for all. 


In reality, hyperglobalization has as much to do with profits and mobile capital as with prices and mobile 
phones, and is governed by large firms that have established increasingly dominant market positions and 
operate under  “free  trade”  agreements  that have been  subject  to  intense  corporate  lobbying and all  too 
frequently enacted with minimal public scrutiny. As described in previous Reports, this is a world where 
money and power have become inseparable and where capital – whether tangible or intangible, long-term 
or short-term, industrial or financial – has extricated itself from regulatory oversight and interference. 


As a result, it is hardly surprising that the heightened anxiety among the growing number of casualties of 
hyperglobalization has led to much more questioning of the official story of the shared benefits of trade. 
Mainstream economists bear their part of the responsibility for the current state of affairs. Ignoring their 




OVERVIEW


XIII


own theoretical subtleties and the nuances of economic history, they remain biased in favour of unqualified
free trade when  it comes  to communicating with policymakers and broader audiences. The mainstream 
narrative pitches “comparative advantage” as a “win–win” boost to economic efficiency and social welfare, 
without specifying the conditions under which such beneficial outcomes can occur or how any negative 
effects could be reduced. 


There is no doubt that the new protectionist tide, together with the declining spirit of international cooperation, 
poses significant challenges for governments around the world. However, doubling down on business as 
usual  is not  the  right  response. Resisting  isolationism effectively  requires  recognizing  that many of  the 
rules adopted to promote “free trade” have failed to move the system in a more inclusive, participatory and 
development-friendly direction. 


This means that it is now essential to introduce a more evidence-based and pragmatic approach to managing 
trade  as well  as  to  designing  trade  agreements. The  narrative  around  trade  should  abandon unrealistic 
assumptions – such as full employment, perfect competition, savings-determined investment or constant 
income distribution – that have underpinned the dominant policy discourse on trade policy. Instead, recognition 
of the lessons from successful export economies and the insights of new trade models that acknowledge the 
impact of trade on inequality need to be combined with an assessment of the causal relationship between
rising inequality, corporate rent seeking, falling investment and mounting indebtedness. 


UNCTAD has argued consistently in the past few years that a new international compact is required – a 
Global New Deal – that would aim for international economic integration in more democratic, equitable 
and sustainable forms. Specifically, with reference to strategies for international trade and the architecture 
that sustains it, there is a strong case, on its seventieth anniversary, for revisiting the Havana Charter for an 
International Trade Organization, which emerged – albeit ephemerally – from the original New Deal and 
can still provide important pointers for our contemporary concerns. 


First  of  all,  the Havana Charter  looked  to  situate  trade  agreements  in  an  expansionary macroeconomic 
setting, noting that “the avoidance of unemployment or underemployment, through the achievement and 
maintenance in each country of useful employment opportunities for those able and willing to work and 
of a large and steadily growing volume of production and effective demand for goods and services, is not 
of domestic concern alone, but is also a necessary condition for the achievement of the general purpose… 
including the expansion of international trade, and thus for the well-being of all other countries”. This focus 
on full employment has been abandoned in the period of hyperglobalization, both at the national level and in 
the “trade” and “economic cooperation” agreements that have dominated the landscape. It should be revived 
if the widespread backlash against trade is not to gather more strength.


Secondly, the Havana Charter recognized the links between labour market conditions, inequality and trade, 
calling for improvements in wages and working conditions in line with productivity changes. It also aimed to 
prevent “business practices affecting international trade which restrain competition, limit access to markets 
or foster monopolistic control”, and dedicated an entire chapter to dealing with the problem of restrictive 
business practices. Revisiting these goals in light of twenty-first century challenges, including those of the 
digital economy, should be a priority.


Thirdly, the Havana Charter insisted that there were multiple development paths to marry local goals with 
integration into the global economy, and that countries should have sufficient policy space to pursue pragmatic 
experimentation to ensure a harmonious marriage. This need for policy space also brings to the forefront the 
matter of negotiating “trade” agreements that have in recent decades privileged the requirements of capital 
and limited the possibilities for development in line with social priorities. 


A decade after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the global economy has been unable to establish a robust 
and stable growth path.  Instead, weak demand,  rising  levels of debt and volatile capital flows have  left 
many economies oscillating between incipient growth recoveries and financial instability. At the same time, 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


XIV


austerity measures and unchecked corporate rentierism have pushed inequality higher and torn at the social 
and political fabric. As the drafters of the Havana Charter knew from experience, tariffs are treacherous 
instruments  for  dealing with  these  problems  and  if  a  vicious  cycle  of  retaliation  takes  hold only make 
matters worse. But trade wars are a symptom not a cause of economic morbidity. The tragedy of our times 
is that just as bolder international cooperation is needed to address those causes, more than three decades of 
relentless banging of the free trade drum has drowned out the sense of trust, fairness and justice on which 
such cooperation depends.




1


CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES
IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY I


1. The Panglossian disconnect


At some point in the past year, signs of a synchro-
nized pick-up in growth, which began in early 2017, 
changed the global economic mood music to a gen-
erally more upbeat tempo.1 Positive assessments of 
future  growth  prospects  from  leading  forecasting 
institutions have led central bankers and macroeco-
nomic policymakers in advanced economies to accept 
that the time has come to end the easy money policies
in place for the past decade. The debate is now about 
when a “monetary reversal” should begin, and how 
fast and how far the process should proceed.


But there are already signs that the band members are 
not fully in step with the new score. Recent growth 
estimates have been more mixed than forecast and
show growing unpredictability. For example, euro-
zone growth (EU-19) in the first quarter of 2018 is 
estimated to have decelerated to 0.4 per cent relative 
to the previous quarter, the slowest rate since the third 
quarter of 2016 (Eurostat, May 2018).2 In the United
States, annualized GDP growth for the first quarter 
has been revised down 2.2 per cent, lower than the 
previous three quarters, while second quarter growth 
rebounded spectacularly  to 4.1 per cent,  thanks  to 
increased  household  spending  and  a  sharp  rise  in 
export earnings. In G20 countries as a group, year-
on-year growth in the first quarter of 2018 at 3.9 per 
cent was still much lower than the 5.4 per cent rates 
recorded in the middle of 2010, during the short-term 
recovery just after the crisis (figure 1.1). All this sug-
gests that the recovery observed since 2017 remains 
uneven and its trajectory uncertain.


More significantly, despite the optimism surrounding 
the official discussion on economic prospects, there 
is  a  growing  sense  of  uncertainty,  driven  both  by 
recent evidence and by a more sober assessment of


medium-term trends, of not knowing exactly what 
is going on in the global economy, or the direction 
that it is taking. The uncertainty is compounded by 
the multiple disconnects between what is officially 
projected and announced, and what people around the 
world are experiencing: wage stagnation and rising 
inequality despite falling unemployment; excessive 
asset-price inflation and  volatile currency movements 
despite  a financial system deemed safer, simpler and 
fairer; depressed real investment despite high corpo-
rate profits; and ratios of debt to income that are close 
to or even higher than those that prevailed just before 
the global crisis a decade ago.


In this context, talk of an accelerating pace of eco-
nomic recovery, tighter labour markets and emerging 
inflationary  pressures  serves  to make  the  shift  to 
tighter monetary policy more palatable to an anxious 


A. Making sense of global economic trends


FIGURE 1.1 G20 real GDP growth rates,
first quarter 2009–first quarter 2018
(Year-on-year percentage change)


Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development,
OECD.Stat database.


-3


-2


-1


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


2


public. It also dampens calls for fiscal expansion. As 
discussed in TDR 2017, fiscal austerity has been the 
norm in the advanced economies since 20103 but cur-
rent projections warn against a more proactive fiscal 
stance. Rather, the prevailing view is that fiscal defi-
cits should continue to be suppressed and public debt
reduced. The recent measures adopted by the United 
States Administration (which are otherwise favoured 
by private capital), such as the tax cuts announced 
in 2017 and plans to enhance infrastructure spending 
(albeit with the vaguest of financial commitments), 
are being viewed with suspicion, since they would 
widen the fiscal deficit of the United States.


The  conventional  position,  therefore,  is  that fiscal 
consolidation must  remain  the  order  of  the  day, 
notwithstanding  the  potential  benefits  of  public 
spending  for  reducing  inequalities  and  imparting 
greater cyclical stability to economies. This leaves 
monetary policy as the only active macroeconomic
instrument  available  to  policymakers  –  and  in  a 
context of economic  revival,  the consensus  is  that 
such policy should now gradually wind down and 
begin to tighten. The difficulty with this position is 
that it involves walking a knife-edge between over-
heating and potential recession, even as it sidesteps 
the continuing problems of insufficient good quality 
employment generation and rising inequality. In addi-
tion, this policy stance creates financial bubbles in 
the form of asset-price appreciations, volatile cross-
border capital flows and – perhaps most important of 
all – unsustainable build-up of debt in both advanced 
and emerging market economies.


In many senses, different parts of the global economy 
are  as,  if  not more,  vulnerable  than  they were  in 
2007 and 2008 prior to the global panic created by 
the collapse of Lehman Brothers. In such a context, 
attempting  to  resolve  the  disconnect  between  real 
and financial movements  in  the  economy  through 
monetary policies alone may well precipitate another
painful episode of restructuring through crisis.


2. Asset market surges


The monetary policy reversal in advanced countries
begs a question. If the recovery is not robust, why are 
central banks and governments fixated on withdraw-
ing the one measure that has kept their economies 
afloat since  the crisis? Standard explanations such 
as  the  threat of  inflation cannot  really provide  the 
answer,  since  inflation  in  advanced  economies  is 


tepid and still below (the very low) target rates, and 
cost push pressures are generally weak as wages are 
not rising significantly, if at all.


The more plausible explanation is a concern with
overheating in asset markets in both advanced and 
developing economies. The cheap and readily avail-
able  liquidity  in  developed  country markets  has 
enabled investors to engage in various forms of the 
carry trade, which have fuelled asset-price spirals in 
two ways. First, the low cost of capital has encour-
aged speculators to invest in a range of asset markets 
in anticipation of high returns. The resulting surge of 
capital flows to bond, equity and property markets 
in many different countries has driven prices up
and  ensured  the  realization of  investors’  expecta-
tions,  generating more  such  investment.  Second, 
the infusion of liquidity triggered credit expansions, 
once banks had partially corrected their post-crisis 
balance  sheets with  government  and  central  bank 
support. The  result  is  improved  access  to  credit 
for households  and corporates,  even  though many 
of them still have large volumes of legacy debt on 
their balance sheets. Some of that credit was in turn 
used for investments in assets, which strengthened 
the price spiral. The resulting price inflation in asset 
markets is increasingly seen as both unwarranted and 
unsustainable, a symptom of “financial euphoria” in 
a Minsky-type cycle.


This  boom  in  asset markets  as  growth  remained 
sluggish,  is  indicative  of  the persistent  disconnect 
between  trends  in  the  real  economy and financial 
sectors.


The impact of the liquidity surge on equity markets 
has been marked, as valuations  touched levels not 
warranted by “fundamentals” or by potential earn-
ings. This  is widely  accepted;  but,  as  long  as  the 
music plays, those in the markets have to keep danc-
ing – and with few players willing to exit, the boom 
has continued. Figures 1.2 and 1.3 present long-term 
trends in markets in some developed economies and 
some emerging markets in Asia. A noteworthy ten-
dency is the growing synchronization of movements 
across both sets of markets both during the boom and 
when markets collapsed during the 2008/09 crisis.


Such synchronization did not exist during the early 
hyperglobalization  years. At  the  time of  the  2001 
dot-com bust,  for  example, while  equity markets 
experienced downturns in the Western developed
countries like France, Germany, the United Kingdom 




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


3


and the United States, and in Japan and the Republic 
of Korea in Asia, those in emerging markets like India 
and Thailand performed reasonably well. But after 
2003, stock markets have moved in tandem to a far 
greater degree. In particular, after adoption of policies 
that infused cheap liquidity into the advanced coun-
tries in response to the global crisis, markets across 
the world have been buoyant. However, although the 
rise in the equity market index between March 2009 
and March 2018 was high across the board, the extent 
of increase varied significantly across countries. For 


example, the increase was 230 per cent in Germany, 
163 per cent in the United States, 300 per cent in India 
and 329 per cent in Thailand (figure 1.4).


Property prices took longer to adjust after the 2008 
crash,  but  even  in  real  estate markets,  buoyancy 
returned with the surge in liquidity, even if to a lesser 
extent than was true of equity markets. In both the 
United States and the euro area (figures 1.5 and 1.6) 
property  prices  have  risen  significantly  in  recent 
years – since 2012 in the case of the United States and 
2014 in the case of the European Union. However, 
synchronization has been far less pronounced even 
across the advanced country property markets. Within 
Europe, for example, real residential property prices 
have been stagnant in France, falling in Italy and ris-
ing in Germany (figure 1.7).


3. Asset markets and income inequality


Sharp price increases in asset markets have aggravat-
ed the inequalities associated with growth during the 
hyperglobalization years. Figure 1.8, which compares 
the increases in average nominal wages between 2009 
and 2015 (the last year for which data are currently 
available) and stock market appreciation, shows the 
substantial differences in the increases of the two in
a set of advanced and developing economies. The 
gap is likely to have grown further since then in all 
of  these  countries. This  underlines  the  regressive 
redistribution  of wealth  in  favour  of  the financial 


FIGURE 1.2 Stock market, selected developed
economies, January 1990–March 2018
(Index)


Source: CEIC Data’s Global Database.


FIGURE 1.3 Stock market, selected developed
and emerging Asian economies,
January 1990–March 2018
(Index)


Source: See figure 1.2.


FIGURE 1.4 Change in stock market indices,
selected economies, 2009–2018
(Percentage)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on CEIC Data’s Global
Database.


0


2,000


4,000


6,000


8,000


10,000


12,000


14,000


16,000


1990 1992 1994 1997 1999 2002 2005 2007 2010 2013 2016


France: CAC 40
Germany: DAX
United Kingdom: FT30
United States: Dow Jones


2018


0


500


1,000


1,500


2,000


2,500


3,000


0


5,000


10,000


15,000


20,000


25,000


30,000


35,000


40,000
45,000


1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 2018


India: Bombay Stock Exchange SENSEX
Japan: Tokyo Nikkei 225
Republic of Korea: Korea Composite RHS (right scale)
Thailand: SET RHS (right scale)


104.0


230.4


162.5


267.9
300.2


198.6


128.6


328.8


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


350


France United
Kingdom


ThailandIndia Republic
of Korea


Germany United
States


Japan




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


4


elite that has resulted from the disconnect between
the real and financial economies.


The increase in inequality is a continuation of a long-
term trend, as noted in TDR 2017. The sharp increase 
in  inequality  associated with  hyperglobalization 
has been  reflected  inter alia  in declining shares of 
wages in national income. Even during the “boom” 
years between the early 2000s and 2007, the share 
of wages fell from 57.5 per cent to less than 55 per 
cent in developed countries, and from 53 to 49.5 per 
cent in developing countries, which until then were 


the lowest points on record.4 Thereafter, the decline 
has continued in advanced economies, and while the 
wage share has recovered somewhat in developing 
and  transition  economies,  it  remains  significantly 
below the levels of the 1990s or even the early 2000s.


One consequence of that trend has been potentially 
sluggish growth in household demand, which could 


FIGURE 1.5 United States residential
property prices, first quarter 
2005–fourth quarter 2017
(Real price index, 2010=100)


Source: Bank for International Settlements (BIS), property price statistics.


FIGURE 1.6 Euro area residential property prices,
first quarter 2005–fourth quarter 2017
(Real price index, 2010=100)


Source: See figure 1.5.


FIGURE 1.7 Residential property prices, selected
European economies, first quarter 
2005–fourth quarter 2017
(Real price index, 2010=100)


Source: See figure 1.5.


FIGURE 1.8 Stock market appreciation and
nominal wages increase, selected
economies, 2009–2015
(Percentage change)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on CEIC Data’s Global
Database; and International Labour Organisation (ILO), Global
Wage Report.


Note: The latest available data on nominal wages allow for comparisons
only through 2015.


0


20


40


60


80


100


120


140


160


180


1234123412341234123412341234123412341234123412341234
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017


80


85


90


95


100


105


110


1234123412341234123412341234123412341234123412341234
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017


60


70


80


90


100


110


120


130


1234123412341234123412341234123412341234123412341234
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017


France Germany Italy


35.1


106.9


66.2


86.8


148.9


103.2


64.5


161.8


10.9 17.6 5.7
15.3


78.1


4.8


25.2


55.1


0


20


40


60


80


100


120


140


160


180


France Germany United
Kingdom


United
States


India Japan Republic
of Korea


Thailand


Stock index value Average nominal wages




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


5


be sustained, if at all, only on the basis of debt. This 
was the trajectory in the developed world before the 
global crisis; what is alarming is that a similar tra-
jectory is now evident in many developing countries 
as well. The next subsection describes how this  is 
playing out and creating extreme vulnerabilities in 
many parts of the world.


4. Volatile capital flows


A clear sign of vulnerabilities accumulated during the 
easy money years is that as the United States Federal 
Reserve and other central banks began the process of 
tentatively unwinding their easy money and low inter-
est rate policies,  the environment for capital flows 
to  developing  countries,  especially  the  emerging 
market economies, became extremely uncertain and 
volatile. From 2010, with quantitative easing under 
way, net private capital flows to developing regions 
surged.  Investors  faced with  dramatically  lowered 
yields on financial assets in the main financial centres 
restructured  their portfolios  favouring carry  trades 
and, more generally, higher yield emerging market 
assets (TDR 2016, TDR 2017). But when developed 
country governments signalled an anticipated return 
to more conventional monetary policies, net private 
capital flows to all developing regions turned steeply 
negative,  beginning  late  in  2014  and  remained  in 
negative territory through 2016 (figure 1.9).


However,  2017  saw a  return  to modestly  positive 
overall net capital inflows mainly to developing Asia 
(excluding China),  high-income Latin American 
economies  and  some  transition  economies. This 
upward  trend  is  unlikely  to  last  in  the wake  of 
adverse current account trends and currency volatil-
ity in several large developing countries, including 
Argentina,  Brazil,  India,  Indonesia  and Turkey. 
Recent estimates from the Institute of International 
Finance (IIF) suggest that, starting in February 2018
there has been a reversal of portfolio capital flows 
to emerging economies. According  to  IIF data  for 
25 emerging economies, sales of bonds and equities 
by  foreign  investors  exceeded  purchases  in April 
2018 by $200 million, which was the largest outflow 
since November 2016 (Otsuka and Toyama, 2018). 
The figure  for  sales  of  bonds  and  equities  rose  to 
$12.3 billion in May led by outflows of $8 billion in 
Asia and $4.7 billion in Africa and the Middle East 
(Jones, 2018). However, since foreign direct invest-
ment held up, the IIF estimated net capital flows to 
emerging markets at a positive $32 billion in April, as 


compared to a monthly average of $7 billion in 2017. 
This has been corroborated by  the  IMF Emerging 
Markets Capital Flows Monitor (Koepke and Goel, 
2018), according to which, while net capital flows to 
emerging markets had been positive in the first quar-
ter of 2018, there was a reversal of portfolio capital 
flows to these markets starting mid-April through to 
late May. However, strong foreign direct investment 
flows have made up for the decline in portfolio flows.


5. The global explosion of debt


In this context, the continued dependence of even lim-
ited global growth on debt remains a core concern. By 
the third quarter of 2017, global debt stocks had risen 
to close to $250 trillion – or to more than three times 
global output –  from  less  than $150  trillion at  the 
onset of the global financial crisis. The most recent 
estimate by UNCTAD for the ratio of global debt to 
GDP puts this at nearly one third higher now than in 
2008. One implication is that even the current mod-
est global recovery rides on a credit bubble. But the 
“wealth effect” that appreciation in asset values has 
in the form of enhanced consumption has been much
weaker during the asset-price boom experienced after 
2012 as compared to the run-up to the global financial 
crisis. This is partly because the burden of legacy debt 
accumulated during the previous boom had not been 


FIGURE 1.9  Net private capital flow by region, 
first quarter 2007–fourth quarter 2017
(Billions of current dollars)


Source: UNCTAD, Financial Statistics Database, based on IMF, Balance
of Payments database; and national central banks.


-300


-200


-100


0


100


200


300


1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017


Developing Africa Developing America
Developing Asia, excl. China Transition economies
China Net private capital flow




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


6


substantially undone, dampening household spend-
ing. When a bubble rides on the unresolved remnants 
of a previous bubble, its effectiveness as a stimulus 
for private spending is much reduced.


Moreover, in keeping with the disconnect between 
the financial and real realms spoken of earlier, debt 
expansion  has  not  financed  increased  investment. 
The ratio of investment to GDP for emerging markets 
and developing economies, which stood at 30.4 per 
cent in crisis year 2008, was only marginally higher 
at 32.3 per cent in 2017, according to the IMF World 
Economic Outlook database. In the advanced econo-
mies, the figure fell from 22.8 to 21.2 per cent.


On the other hand, encouraged by appreciated equity 
values  and  access  to  cheap  and  easy money,  cor-
porations have opted  for mergers  and acquisitions 
(M&A). According  to Thomson Reuters  data,  the 
value of completed and pending M&A deals world-
wide crossed $3 trillion in the first half of 2018, rising 
by close to 65 per cent compared with the first half 
of 2017 (table 1.1). These M&A, which often require 
buying up  rivals  in  an  oligopolistic  context,  have 
taken company valuations even higher, completely 
delinking them from either current fundamentals or 
possible  future  earning  streams. High profits  also 
allowed  large  corporates  to  use  the  cash  reserves 
they held to buy back their own stocks at high value, 
boosting the value of the stockholding of promoters 
and incumbent managers. This too has added to the 
fragility and uncertainty characterizing  the current 
environment.


At  the  same  time,  the  economic  dynamics  driv-
ing  ballooning  debt  burdens  and  potential  debt 
crises  have  changed. A decade  ago,  unsustainable 
household debt in the United States and excessive


borrowing  by financial  institutions  triggered  dis-
aster. With core banking sectors in lead economies 
having deleveraged – to an extent and not least due 
to  tighter regulatory measures –  the biggest worry 
at  present  is  corporate  debt, with  corporate  bond 
markets  and  non-bank  intermediaries  playing  an 
increasingly important role relative to core banking 
sectors. By some estimates, globally, over a third of 
non-financial corporations are now highly leveraged, 
with debt-to-earnings ratios of 5 and above, while 
noninvestment-grade corporate bonds have quadru-
pled since 2008 (Standard & Poor Global, 2018; Lund 
et al., 2018). In the United States, the ratio of credit to 
non-financial corporations to GDP, which had fallen 
from 69.7 per cent in 2007 to 66.1 per cent in 2011, 
has since risen to 73.5 per cent in 2017.5


In  this  context,  the  debt  vulnerabilities  of  devel-
oping  countries  have  built  up  on  several  fronts 
(United Nations,  forthcoming  2018a). While  the 
bulk of global debt stocks is still held in advanced 
economies,  the  share  of  developing  countries  in 
these  stocks  increased  from  around  7  per  cent  in 
2007  to  around  26  per  cent  a  decade  later. Total 
external  debt  stocks  of  developing  countries  and 
economies in transition are estimated to have reached
$7.64 trillion in 2017, having grown at an average 
yearly rate of 8.5 per cent between 2008 and 2017. 
This substantially reverses the achievements of the
2000s,  during which many developing  economies 
managed  to  stabilize  and  improve  their debt posi-
tions because of the combination of a favourable
external economic environment,  international debt 
relief and strong domestic growth performance. The 
principal difficulty faced by developing countries in 
regard  to maintaining debt  sustainability has been 
their hastened and often premature integration into 
rapidly  expanding  international  financial markets, 
and the concomitant much larger presence of private 
lenders in developing country liabilities. For devel-
oping countries as a whole, the share of public and 
publicly  guaranteed  (PPG)  external  debt  owed  to 
private creditors increased from 41 per cent in 2000 
to over 60 per cent in 2017. In sub-Saharan Africa 
alone, the share of private non-guaranteed external 
debt (PNG) in overall external debt rose from a low 
of around 6 per cent in 2000 to about a quarter by 
2015. This  has  entailed  important  structural  shifts 
in external balance sheets, from debt to equity and 
towards bond- rather than bank-related finance.


Least developed economies have mostly been affected 
in terms of their external public debt positions and


TABLE 1.1 Completed and pending
mergers and acquisitions deals 
worldwide, 2016–2018 


Value
(Millions of


current dollars) Number


H1 2016 1,793,769.6 24,510
H2 2016 2,287,519.7 25,058
H1 2017 1,858,420.4 26,134
H2 2017 2,069,205.3 26,415
H1 2018 3,031,137.9 23,777


Source: Thomson Reuters.




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


7


associated  rising debt  service  costs  in  the wake of 
sudden reversals of procyclical inflows of cheap credit 
from the international financial markets. Median lev-
els of external public debt for this group of countries 
increased from 33 per cent of GDP in 2013 to 47 per 
cent in 2017. As a result, the number of low-income 
developing economies facing significant debt chal-
lenges has  increased from 22 to 35, with countries 
in  sub-Saharan Africa  accounting  for most  of  this 
increase  (United Nations,  2018b). Between  2014 
and 2017,  the number of  developing  countries  for 
which debt service represents more than 15 per cent 
of government revenues has increased from 21 to 29.


The explosion of non-financial corporate debt over 
recent  years  has more  directly  affected  emerging 
market  economies,  where  the  ratio  of  credit  to 
non-financial  corporations  to GDP went  up  from 


56.3  per  cent  in  2008  to  104.6  per  cent  in  2017. 
Where  emerging market  corporates  face  difficul-
ties  in  appropriately  hedging  their  exposures,  this 
represents a worrying vulnerability to private sector 
debt crises that, if systemic enough, can easily spill 
over into public sector debt crises. More generally, in 
many emerging market economies, changes in their 
external balance sheets from debt to equity (on the
asset as well as the liability side) between 2000 and 
2016, promoted by governments as a way of lower-
ing external debt vulnerabilities, have only served 
to  heighten other financial  vulnerabilities,  such  as 
a large and volatile foreign presence in local equity 
markets (Akyüz, forthcoming 2018). In addition, a 
more recent feature of portfolio capital flows to these 
economies is a renewed high share of flows through 
debt instruments rather than equity (van Dijkhuizen 
and Neuteboom, 2018).


At the global level, excess liquidity has rendered the 
system vulnerable to crises. This is causing central 
bankers  in developed countries  to  look  for oppor-
tunities to unwind their unconventional monetary
measures, to prevent further build-up of fragility. But 
the moment central banks made clear their intention 
to  allow  rates  to  rise  and drawback  the monetary 
lever, markets  turned  unstable,  as  such measures 
would undermine the basis on which carry trade-type
investments were undertaken. As central banks, using 
the  justification of a  (still uncertain)  synchronized 
global recovery, decide to unwind balance sheets and 
raise rates, investors will turn bearish.


As we  have  seen,  vulnerabilities  are  particularly 
serious in the emerging markets. The large foreign 
capital inflows that drove asset-price inflation also 
led to the accumulation of stocks of foreign finan-
cial capital, brought in by investors with short-term 
interests, who are likely to exit when access to cheap 
money in developed countries comes to an end. If 
and when  they do,  the  resulting  capital flight will 
have destabilizing effects in not just stock, but also 
currency markets, with attendant external effects (on 
firms that have foreign currency borrowings on their 
books, for example). Countries that have been most 
favoured by foreign investors and experienced the 


largest spike in asset prices, like India and Thailand, 
would likely be most vulnerable.


This creates a dilemma for central bankers. If they 
do not reverse the easy money regime, the collapse 
in asset markets, when it occurs, will be steeper and 
more  damaging. On  the  other  hand,  reversing  the 
policy regime would abort the halting recovery that 
is under way. There are no clear  responses  to  this 
dilemma,  especially  as  (other  than  in  the United 
States) there are no plans for any compensating fiscal 
stimuli to cover for the possible instability. So, even 
with the more optimistic assessments of future eco-
nomic prospects, considerable uncertainty prevails. 
The real issue now is how hard the landing in asset 
markets is likely to be and the implications that would 
have for the real economy. The landing is likely to be 
harder, and the external effects more damaging, the 
more prolonged the speculative spiral.


Current conditions clearly seem to be pointing to a 
crisis of some kind. However, a situation of height-
ened volatility and uncertainty around a weak and 
erratic growth path can persist for quite some time, 
especially if accommodating monetary policy is fur-
ther extended, and the proposed sequence of interest 
rate  increases  in  the major economies  is  softened. 


B. Emerging policy challenges




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


8


In  the  interim, flows of  easy money will  continue 
to support asset appreciation worldwide, including 
through outflows to developing countries, at least for 
some more time.


There are other measures that could add further
froth to financial markets. For example, the recent 
tax reform in the United States (which represents a
net private windfall gain of nearly 1 per cent of GDP 
per annum going predominantly to the wealthy, and 
a corresponding loss for the government), together 
with similar transfers of wealth into the hands of the
corporate sector and wealthy individuals in other
developed  economies  (through  privatization  and 
similar measures) could continue to support finan-
cial innovation and speculation, as well as activities 
such as M&A, stock buy-backs and other portfolio 
operations. These contribute  to  increased financial 
concentration  and political  leverage,  even  as  they 
provide a temporary boost to growth; they also add 
to the forces potentially creating future instability in 
financial markets.


But policymakers face other factors that are potent 
sources of instability. Navigating these requires both 
astute planning and a much greater degree of interna-
tional cooperation and coordination than is currently
evident. Two in particular deserve closer attention: 
the revival of global oil prices, which were depressed 
over recent years, and their likely effects on inflation 
and balance of payments in oil-importing countries; 
and the possible impacts of the protectionist pressures
that now appear  to be building between  the major 
trading partners.


1. The oil price hike


Since mid-May 2018, the price of Brent crude has 
been hovering close to the $80 per barrel mark. That 
was a $47 per barrel (or 64 per cent) rise compared to 
the previous low recorded in June 2017. This increase 
in price occurred despite the absence of any major 
revival in global demand for oil. It has been driven 
largely by two factors operating on the supply side. 
One is the success of what has been termed “OPEC-
plus” in curtailing global oil supplies, which began 
with a change in stance by Saudi Arabia. In 2014, 
Saudi Arabia, which accounted for nearly a third of 
OPEC production, resisted production cuts  to stall 
the oil price decline, on the grounds that this would 
render shale producers competitive and increase their
market share at the expense of its own. However, this 


position changed over time, as the low oil prices hit 
the Saudi Government’s finances, requiring unpopu-
lar subsidy cuts and heavy borrowing by the state. 
Therefore, it agreed to control supply to raise prices, 
and OPEC went even further in December 2016 by 
striking a deal with the Russian Federation and other 
non-OPEC oil producers to cut their supplies to the 
global market  by  558,000  barrels  of  crude  a  day. 
These cuts were on top of the 1.2 million barrels a 
day in cuts already agreed to by OPEC members. In 
total, this amounted to a reduction equal to almost 
2 per cent of the then global oil supply. As a result 
of these cuts oil inventories have fallen sharply and
oil prices have risen.


Other measures that are more geopolitical in nature 
(such as the decision of the United States to withdraw
from the nuclear deal with the Islamic Republic of 
Iran and reimpose sanctions) are likely to worsen the 
oil supply shortfall, and have affected expectations 
accordingly. The net result was a sharp rise in world 
oil prices. To the extent that this increase contributes 
to overall inflation, the justification being provided 
by central banks to unwind their easy money poli-
cies would be validated and rate rises are likely to 
follow. But, as noted earlier, that move could have 
unintended effects that abort the incipient recovery.


2. United States protectionism and
potential trade wars


Another factor intensifying uncertainty is the protec-
tionist turn in the United States. From January 2018 
the United  States Administration  has  announced 
various measures  that have come close  to  trigger-
ing what many are calling a “trade war”, beginning 
with quotas and tariffs on solar panels and washing 
machine imports from China, and then moving onto 
steel and aluminium for a wider set of countries, as 
well as investigating United States car imports.


The tariffs were imposed under a World Trade
Organization (WTO) clause relating to imports that 
threaten national security, though the idea is to curb 
competition from “cheap metal that is subsidized by 
foreign countries”, which amounts to a “dumping” 
charge. Subsequently,  further  trade sanctions were 
imposed on China, on the grounds that it was using 
unfair  tactics  such  as  hacking  commercial  secrets 
and  demanding  disclosure  of  “trade  secrets”  by 
United States companies in return for access to the
Chinese market. Those measures included investment 




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


9


restrictions and tariffs on other Chinese exports to be
imposed in stages.


These measures – and other tariffs imposed on other 
trading partners such as the European Union, Canada 
and Japan – are being contested at the WTO, but the 
consequences of such a move are not clear and will
anyway be drawn out. The other response has been 
in the form of announcing retaliatory tariffs, targeted 
at specific activities and exports of the United States. 
The European Union announced duties on a series of
United States imports totalling over $3 billion and 
Canada has countered with tariffs on over $16 bil-
lion worth  of  imports. The  initial  response  from 
China was measured. In an early April 2018 state-
ment, the Chinese Government announced tariffs on 
United States imports worth around $3 billion, which 
included a 15 per cent duty on 120 American products 
such as fruits, nuts, wine and steel pipes and a 25 per 
cent tax on eight others, like recycled aluminium and 
pork. This was seen as a symbolic gesture indicat-
ing  that China would  respond when necessary.  In 
June 2018 the United States announced the launch 
of substantially enhanced tariffs on imports from
China, the first tranche of which was a 25 per cent 
tariff  on  818  products,  imports  of which  into  the 
United States were valued at $34 billion. And in early 
July 2018 President Trump threatened to impose an 
additional $200 billion of tariffs on Chinese goods. 
This triggered a more concerted response from China 
on imports from the United States. There are further 
lists of products to be taxed that are pending as at 
the  time of writing. A tit-for-tat process  is already 
under way.


The impact of such a wave of protectionism is uncer-
tain. It is true that the United States aggregate trade 
deficit increased by close to 13 per cent to $568 billion 


in 2017. Of that, around $375 billion was on account 
of the deficit between China and the United States. 
The point, however, is that imposing these unilateral 
tariffs, is not going to help in reducing these deficits, 
which reflect macroeconomic imbalances, and things 
could get even worse with retaliatory action. Moving 
in this direction would likely disrupt prevailing global 
value chains around which much of trade is now built. 
Such disruption would,  in  the first  instance, affect 
the  profits  of multinational  operations  rather  than 
national output, but with a likely adverse knock-on 
impact on investment given the heightened level of 
uncertainty. However, over time it could encourage 
relocation or  ‘reverse’  relocation  in  some areas  in 
order to jump tariff barriers, thereby partially arrest-
ing the process of globalization. On the other hand, 
to the extent that it increases government revenues 
and therefore expenditures in individual nations, it 
could drive growth based on domestic demand with 
reduced leakages in the form of imports. So the effect 
on global  growth  and  its  distribution  is  not  easily 
predicted. But so long as trade continues, which it 
would since factors other than tariffs drive trade, trade 
deficits and surpluses would persist.


In sum, while unilateral protectionist actions by the 
United States may or may not  help  strengthen  its 
domestic producers, they are unlikely to make a sig-
nificant difference to the size of its external deficit. 
Moreover, they are likely to introduce disruptions to 
trade patterns and add to uncertainty, which in the 
absence of expansionary macroeconomic measures
will  probably damage world  trade. They will  also 
have distributional consequences which are likely to 
weaken growth (see appendix I.A below). The Trump 
Administration sees its protectionist actions as a way 
of  escaping  the  long  years  of  relative  stagnation. 
What it may actually get is more of the same.


1. Signals from global trade


World merchandise trade has picked up recently but 
still remains below recent highs. World merchandise 
exports amounted to $17 trillion in 2017, higher than 
the  $16  trillion  recorded  in  the  previous year,  but 
below  the  $19  trillion  level  recorded  in  2013  and 
2014, though this partly reflects the decline of com-
modity prices from the pre-2014 highs.6


Trade measured  in  volume  terms  is  also  showing 
signs of losing momentum. In 2017, the volume of 
world merchandise trade grew at 4.6 per cent, up from 
1.5 per cent in 2016. However, trade is estimated to 
grow at 4.2 per cent in 2018. So, while merchandise 
trade growth is off its post-crisis lows, the recovery, 
even before the recent rise in trade tensions, shows 
signs of  tapering off. This means that unless  there 
are substantial cross-country variations in trade


C. Global trade patterns




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


10


performance underlying the aggregate trends, indi-
vidual countries cannot expect trade to serve as the
lead stimulus to growth. A critical issue is the extent to 
which subdued trade growth affects the performance 
of China as a  significant driver of global demand, 
because if this is adversely affected, other countries 
would face sluggish demand for their exports.


According  to  disaggregated figures  from  the CPB 
database,7 there were two noteworthy features of
the recovery in world trade in 2017. First, the larg-
est increases in import demand came from emerging 
economies, which saw imports grow at 6.9 per cent 
in 2017 compared with 0.6 per cent in 2016. The cor-
responding figures for the developed countries were 


3.5 and 2.1 per cent. Second, Asia, Latin America 
and the United States led the table in terms of import
volume growth, with Asia (8.8 per cent growth) well 
ahead of Latin America (6.2 per cent) and the United 
States (4 per cent). Euro area imports grew at a much 
slower  rate of 3.1 per cent. Asia, according  to  the 
WTO,  contributed 2.9  percentage  points  to world 
import growth, or 60 per cent of the overall increase.


However, the evidence for the first four months of 
2018 suggests that after what appeared to be a revival, 
import demand from some of the post-crisis growth 
poles in the world economy is slowing (figure 1.10). 
For the world as a whole, year-on-year growth rates of 
import volumes during the first four months of 2018 
stood at 4.7 per cent as compared with 4.8 per cent 
in the corresponding period of the previous year. But 
import growth had come down from 6.9 per cent to 
5.9 per cent in the case of the emerging economies.


Asia’s retreat as a source of demand was partly led 
by China, which besides experiencing a slowdown 
in  output  growth  is  simultaneously  engaged  in  an 
effort at rebalancing growth away from investment to 
consumption. Investment, which accounted for 55 per 
cent of GDP growth in 2013, contributed only 32 per 
cent  in  2017,  resulting  in  a  decline  in  imports  of 
capital goods that may not have been compensated by 
additional imports of consumption goods. Given that 
development, the continued presence of the United 
States as a contributor to growth in global demand 
is even more crucial for global trade buoyancy. This 
makes the United States Administration’s threat of 
raising  broad  protectionist walls  potentially  even 
more detrimental to growth in the rest of the world, 
coming as it does at a time when global demand is 
already subdued. While Asia’s role as a growth pole 
has been dampened, the contribution of the United 
States is increasingly uncertain.


2. Commercial services trade


Services  trade,  by  contrast,  does  not  show  such 
loss of momentum. World services exports, which 
fell  in 2015 and were sluggish  in 2016,  registered 
a significant revival in 2017, from a little less than 
$5  trillion  to  $5.3  trillion. However,  the  value  of 
services exports was not very much higher than the 
$5.1 trillion registered in 2014.8 The shift to higher 
growth in 2017 characterized all groups: developed 
countries, developing countries and transition econo-
mies, which after consecutive years of negative or 


FIGURE 1.10 World trade volume trends,
January 2008–April 2018
(Index numbers, 2010 = 100)


Source: Centraal Planbureau (CPB) Netherlands Bureau of Economic
Policy Analysis, World Trade database.


Note: Country groupings are those used by the source.


70


80


90


100


110


120


130


140


150


2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


Emerging economies


70


80


90


100


110


120


130


140


150


2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


WorldAdvanced economies


70


80


90


100


110


120


130


140


150


2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


United StatesJapanEuro area


70


80


90


100


110


120


130


140


150


2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


70


80


90


100


110


120


130


140


150


2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


Latin AmericaAfrica and Middle East


70


80


90


100


110


120


130


140


150


2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


Imports Exports


Emerging Asia




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


11


low growth  recorded growth  rates  of  7.1,  7.9  and 
12.2 per cent respectively.


Quantity data available for the two largest compo-
nents of trade in services – maritime transportation 
and tourism – offer additional  insight on trends  in 
the trade in services. World seaborne trade gathered 
momentum  in  2017, with  volumes  expanding  by 
4 per cent, the fastest growth in five years. Within 
this, containerized trade and dry bulk commodities 
recorded  the  fastest  rates of  expansion. Following 
the relatively weak performances of the two previous 
years, containerized trade increased by a firm 6 per 
cent and dry bulk commodities  trade  increased by 
4.4 per cent in 2017 (UNCTAD, forthcoming 2018).


International tourism performed poorly in 2016, when 
international tourist arrivals grew at only 3.9 per cent, 
the  lowest rate since 2009. However,  international 
tourist arrivals rose by 7 per cent in 2017, the strong-
est  growth  registered  in  seven  years. The United 
Nations World Tourism Organization estimates that 
this buoyancy would be sustained with arrivals rising 
by 4 to 5 per cent in 2018. Growth rates rose across 
all regions, with Europe and Africa registering 8 per 
cent growth in arrivals, Asia-Pacific 6 per cent, the 


Middle East 5 per cent and the Americas 3 per cent 
(in which South America recorded 7 per cent).


3. Commodity price trends


A  return  of  buoyancy  to  commodity markets  is 
likely to benefit some developing country commodity 
exporters. The prices of a broad range of commodi-
ties are set to rise over 2018, continuing (with some 
exceptions) the trend observed since January 2016, 
which is when the decline in commodity prices
from  2011 was  reversed. That  rising  price  trend 
gathered momentum and spread to a larger range of 
commodities during the first half of 2018. Overall, 
according to the World Bank,9 commodity prices in
the first quarter of 2018 rose in three fourths of the 
commodities covered by it. However, in the case of 
more than 80 per cent of these commodities, prices 
are still below their 2011 peaks.


There are two other noteworthy features in these
trends. First,  for  one  large group of  commodities, 
consisting  of  agricultural  food products,  the  price 
decline of 2017 intensified in the first half of 2018 
(table 1.2). The All Food Index fell by 4 per cent in 


TABLE 1.2  World primary commodity prices, 2008–2018
(Percentage change over previous year, unless otherwise indicated)


Commodity groups 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017  2018a


All commoditiesb 33.5 -31.6 24.7 28.6 -3.0 -3.8 -7.9 -36.1 -9.7 17.8 17.1


Non-fuel commoditiesc 22.9 -18.2 27.3 18.7 -12.8 -6.6 -7.8 -19.0 2.8 10.2 0.4


Non-fuel commodities (in SDRs)c 19.0 -16.2 28.7 14.7 -10.1 -5.8 -7.8 -12.1 3.5 10.5 -5.5
All food 32.6 -9.9 12.3 24.0 -6.5 -10.0 -0.1 -16.1 4.1 -0.6 -4.0


Food and tropical beverages 31.8 -2.3 12.3 24.1 -9.8 -9.4 3.8 -14.1 2.7 -1.1 -5.4
Tropical beverages 19.4 1.2 19.6 31.0 -22.2 -19.7 23.7 -11.0 -3.0 -3.1 -6.3
Food 35.9 -3.3 10.1 21.8 -5.4 -6.4 -1.2 -15.1 4.6 -0.4 -5.2


Vegetable oilseeds and oils 33.9 -22.5 12.3 23.9 0.3 -11.0 -7.3 -20.4 7.5 0.4 -1.0
Agricultural raw materials 8.1 -16.1 38.9 23.1 -19.4 -8.8 -11.8 -13.3 -0.2 5.3 -4.8
Minerals, ores and metals 20.8 -13.8 34.8 20.5 -7.0 -9.3 -13.0 -17.1 4.9 12.2 6.7


Minerals, ores and non-precious
metals 19.2 -26.9 41.4 12.1 -16.9 -1.7 -15.0 -24.6 2.2 27.8 7.2
Precious metals 23.4 7.5 27.5 30.8 3.4 -15.8 -11.0 -9.9 7.1 0.4 6.1


Fuel commodities 37.9 -38.5 23.3 32.2 -0.4 -1.2 -7.5 -44.2 -18.2 26.1 27.3


Memo item:
Manufacturesd 4.9 -5.6 1.9 10.3 -2.2 4.0 -1.8 -9.5 -1.1 4.9 ..


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on UNCTAD, Commodity Price Statistics Online; and United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), Monthly
Bulletin of Statistics, various issues.


Note: In current dollars unless otherwise specified.
a Percentage change between the average for the period January to May 2018 and January to May 2017.
b Including fuel commodities and precious metals. Average 2014–2016 weights are used for aggregation.
c Excluding fuel commodities and precious metals. SDRs = special drawing rights.
d Unit value of exports of manufactured goods of developed countries.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


12


the first half of 2018 relative to the same period of the 
previous year. All categories (food, tropical bever-
ages, and vegetable oilseeds and oils) reflected this 
tendency. Second, it appears that commodity price 
movements are being determined less by strengthen-
ing demand conditions and more by developments 
on the supply side. The case of oil (discussed in sec-
tion B) is striking in this regard, with production cuts 
not just by OPEC countries but others like the Russian 
Federation and many non-OPEC producers, and sup-
ply disruptions resulting from sanctions and political 
unrest, underlying the recent sharp price increases. 
But even in the case of metals, supply-side factors 
– such as measures to address pollution – held back 
production in China, which is a leading commodity 
importer. The consequent  substitution of domestic 
production with imports rather than additions to
demand increased imports, affecting steel, aluminium 
and iron ore. In the case of commodities for which 
supply was easy, prices were stable or even fell.


Overall, prices of metals seem to be losing momen-
tum. As compared  to an  increase of 27.8 per  cent 
in 2017,  the  index of prices of minerals, ores and 
non-precious metals rose by just 7.2 per cent in the 
first half of 2018 relative to the same period of the 
previous year. The continued buoyancy of prices was 
true mainly of oil and the precious metals.


From  a  medium-term  perspective,  while  the 
commodity  price  cycles  for  the major  groups  of 
commodities were more or less similar (figure 1.11), 
within the non-fuel group there were significant dif-
ferences between agricultural raw materials, on the 
one hand, and fuel commodities and minerals, ores 
and metals  on  the  other.  For  a  considerably  long 
period  since  early  2011,  the  prices  of  agricultural 
commodities have been declining or stagnant. Food 
price  indices  for major  crops  and  food  crops  as  a 
whole have fallen by more than a third relative to
their recent peaks (Bellmann and Hepburn, 2017). 
While supplies have been plentiful, the major reason 
is depressed demand, aggravated by the slowdown 
in China.


FIGURE 1.11 Monthly commodity price indices by
commodity group, January 2002–
May 2018
(Index numbers, 2002=100)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on UNCTADstat. For
more details on the data sources see http://unctadstat.unctad.
org/wds/TableViewer/summary.aspx?ReportId=140863.


0.5


0.7


0.9


1.1


1.3


1.5


1.7


1.9


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


350


400


450


2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


All commodities
All commodities (in SDRs)
Non-fuel commodities
Non-fuel commodities (in SDRs)
Dollar per SDRs (right scale)


0


100


200


300


400


500


600


2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


Agricultural raw materials
All minerals, ores and metals
Fuel commodities


0


100


200


300


400


2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018


Food
Tropical beverages
Vegetable oilseeds and oils




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


13


As noted earlier, the decade-long strategy of reviv-
ing  growth  through  unorthodox monetary means 
(“quantitative easing”)  in  the advanced economies 
has  had  only  limited  success  in  spurring  income 
and  employment  growth. The persistent weakness 
of  effective  demand,  compounded  by  post-crisis 
deleveraging by  households  and firms,  dampened 
productive investment, while higher income inequal-
ity and lower employment rates prevented a strong 
rebound of consumption. It does not help that govern-
ments remain reluctant to spend to support growth. 
The result is a new normal of low growth.


In  the  two decades  prior  to  the  global  crisis,  in  a 
context  of  financial  liberalization  and  tight  fiscal 
policies,  two means  of  stimulating  growth  oper-
ated  to differing degrees  in  the various  regions of 
the world: debt-fuelled consumption expansion and
export expansion. A mapping of global growth shows 
that these have continued to be the major strategies 
in the post-crisis period. However, both options tend 
to increase vulnerabilities and fail to generate robust 
global growth.


Table  1.3  shows  the  configuration  of  demand  in 
selected  countries  and  regional  groups  across  the 
world economy. The categorization is derived from a 
model-based analysis of different forms of expansion
and contraction of demand  in  the global  system.10
In  this  framework,  domestic  output  increases  in 
response to increased demand through private invest-
ment, government spending and exports, and shrinks 
because of subtractions from aggregate demand in the 
form of private savings, taxes and imports. Private 
saving is part of income, but when it is not equally 
compensated by  investment,  it drops out  from  the 
flow of  effective demand. Taxes  represent  income 
diverted to the government, which if not spent by the 
public sector becomes “government saving”. Imports 
represent income spent on output generated abroad. 
Accordingly, the growth rate of aggregate supply can 
be decomposed into its three main demand compo-
nents or “growth drivers”:


  1.  private  demand, whose  growth  rate  depends 
on investment, savings and the tax, saving and 
import rates;


  2.  government demand, whose growth rate depends 
on government spending on goods and services, 
taxes and the tax, saving and import rates;


  3.  external demand, whose growth rate depends on 
exports, imports and the tax, saving and import 
rates.


Based  on  this  framework,  table  1.3  presents  the 
results of an analysis of the drivers of global growth 
in the current year.11 The average rate of growth of 
aggregate supply over the two-year period 2017–2018 
is estimated, along with the relative contributions of 
each of its components.12 The countries or country
groups in the table are classified according to which 
growth  driver  is  dominant. Within  each  category, 
countries are  ranked by  the  relative  importance of 
that particular driver.13 A  ranking of  economies  in 
this way sheds light on the character of the growth 
strategy per se (how the observed growth of output 
is achieved), rather than on how fast that economy 
is growing.


A  striking  result  in  table  1.3  is  that  in  19  out  of 
30 cases, growth relies more strongly on net exports 
than  on  domestic  demand,  whether  private  or 
public. This raises a number of concerns. First, an 
economy that shows a relatively strong dependence 
on net export demand, as defined above, must record 
stronger growth of exports than of imports. This can 
result from either a successful strategy of increasing 
exports over time, or a successful strategy of contain-
ing domestic demand for imports relative to demand 
for exports, or a combination of the two.


Countries  showing  a  tendency  towards  a  relative 
reduction of imports are likely to be those dealing 
with current account deficits, such as France, India, 
Turkey, the United Kingdom and some countries in 
Central America  and  the Caribbean.  In  these  and 
similar cases, increases in net export demand result 
from containing imports, through reductions of gov-
ernment demand (possibly because of fiscal austerity 
measures that constrain public spending) or private 
demand (possibly because of reductions in workers’ 
real incomes that erode consumption and by exten-
sion  private  investment). Either way,  the  result  is 
a shrinking current account deficit. This creates an 
underlying bias that depresses global demand in the 
aggregate, particularly if a considerable number of 
relatively large countries choose such a macroeco-
nomic strategy.


An obvious  alternative way  for  these  countries  to 
reduce  their  external  deficits would  be  for  other 


D. The drivers of growth




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


14


trading  countries  that  consistently  run  surpluses 
to increase their domestic demand and thus their
imports, which would  in  the process contribute  to 
an addition  to global demand for exports. Besides 
helping  other  countries,  this would  also  facilitate 
a recovery of global growth. Indeed, in the econo-
mies  in  the  upper  section  of  table  1.3,  for whom 
the main driver of aggregate  supply growth  is net 
export demand, and which are known as “surplus” 
economies, the contribution of domestic demand to 
growth of either the public or the private sector (or 
both), is considerably weak, if not negative, and so 
there is considerable scope for expansion.


A  second  cause  for  concern  is  with  respect  to 
economies  whose  aggregate  supply  growth  is 
mostly driven by net external demand. Nearly half 
of them rely heavily on commodity or oil exports. 
(This includes Saudi Arabia, for which government 
demand is a  strong driver, but where there is also a 
role for external demand.) These economies tend to 
be large importers of manufactures from their main 
export markets.  Since  global  commodity  demand 
tends to be procyclical, rising during the booms and 
falling during slowdowns, the “strong exporters” in 
this group as a whole are likely to be vulnerable to, 
and  contribute  to,  boom–bust  growth  cycles. The 
growth  dynamics  of  this  group  therefore  have  a 
considerable bearing on the potential instability of 
global growth.


The middle section of table 1.3 includes six econo-
mies (and one country group) for whom the strongest 
demand driver is the private sector. Among these, a 
noteworthy case  is China. First,  despite  running a 
current account surplus, net external demand is not 
its main growth driver. As a matter of fact, relative to 
its own GDP, its current account surplus is shrinking, 
to just above 1 per cent, as compared with about 9 per 
cent of GDP in 2007. Second, the contributions to 
growth of the three components (public, private and 
external) are remarkably similar. This reflects some 
success  in  rebalancing  the economy,  as well  as  in 
contributing to global demand to the extent that the 
domestic growth drivers are strong, with respect to 
its own economy as well as relative to world output. 
While debt levels in China have been increasing, this 
was partly the result of a planned credit expansion
seeking  to  rebalance  growth  away  from  external 
sources; and there have been recent moves to reduce
domestic debt, especially that held by corporations.
However, the other five economies in the group where 
private sector demand is stronger than the other two 


TABLE 1.3 Drivers of demand in different
countries, 2017–2018


Aggregate
supply Fiscal Private External


Relative
strength


External demand is
main driver
United Kingdom 1.7 -0.5 0.1 2.1 ***
Other transition economies 6.6 0.8 0.8 5.1 ***
North Africa 6.9 0.6 1.0 5.4 ***
Other East Asia 3.9 0.6 0.4 2.9 ***
Republic of Korea 3.6 0.1 0.8 2.7 ***
Other West Asia 5.9 1.3 0.4 4.3 ***
Non-European Union Europe 2.4 0.2 0.5 1.7 ***
Russian Federation 3.4 -0.3 0.9 2.8 ***
Mexico 3.1 -0.1 1.1 2.1 ***
Japan 1.5 -0.9 0.8 1.6 ***
Germany 2.3 -0.1 0.9 1.5 **
Italy 2.0 -0.2 0.8 1.4 **
Caribbean 3.1 0.8 0.9 1.5 **
Other European Union 2.9 0.4 0.9 1.6 **
France 2.2 0.4 0.7 1.1 **
Turkey 6.4 1.4 2.3 2.9 *
Indonesia 5.4 1.0 2.0 2.5 *
Other developed countries 3.6 1.3 0.8 1.5 *
India 7.4 1.5 2.9 3.2 *


Private demand is
main driver
Other South America 0.2 -0.5 1.2 -0.5 ***
Argentina 4.5 0.3 3.0 1.2 ***
Canada 2.5 0.7 1.6 0.2 ***
United States 2.7 0.7 1.2 0.8 **
Australia 2.7 1.0 1.3 0.5 **
Brazil 1.8 -1.0 1.5 1.3 *
China 6.6 1.9 2.5 2.4 *


Government demand is
main driver
Other sub-Saharan Africa 3.0 2.3 0.1 0.6 ***
Saudi Arabia 0.2 2.6 -3.5 1.0 ***
Other South Asia 5.0 3.1 1.4 0.5 ***
South Africa 1.4 0.7 0.5 0.2 **


Source: United Nations Global Policy Model.
Note: Stars indicate the relative strength of the main driver of aggregate


demand with respect to the second strongest driver (* if difference
is smaller or equal to 30 per cent of main driver, ** if difference
is greater than 30 per cent and smaller or equal to 50 per cent
of main driver, *** if difference is greater than 50 per cent of
main driver). Country groups are as follows: Other East Asia
includes the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Hong Kong
(China), Malaysia, Mongolia and Singapore; Non-European Union
Europe includes Norway, Serbia and Switzerland; Caribbean
includes Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica;
Other European Union includes Croatia, Estonia, Greece, the
Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain and Sweden; Other West
Asia includes Iraq, Lebanon and the United Arab Emirates; North
Africa includes Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia; Other
transition economies includes Georgia, Kazakhstan and Ukraine;
Other developed countries includes Israel and New Zealand;
Other South America includes Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and
Peru; Other South Asia includes Afghanistan, Bangladesh, the
Islamic Republic of Iran and Pakistan; Other sub-Saharan Africa
includes Angola, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya,
Nigeria and most sub-Saharan African countries excluding South
Africa.




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


15


drivers  (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada  and 
the United States) are experiencing rising financial 
vulnerability,  since  the  growth of  private  demand 
has been accompanied by increasing levels of debt. 
As discussed earlier in section A, in some cases the 
debt burden is carried by the corporate sector, and 
in other cases it is with households. Corporate debt 
increases have been mostly fed by two factors. Some 
corporate borrowing has been directed towards activi-
ties like M&A and “share buy-backs”, which have 
led  to  unsustainable  increases  in  stock valuations. 
There  is  also  a  link  between  corporate  indebted-
ness  and  capital flows,  because of  the  carry  trade 
possibilities enabled by loose monetary policies in
advanced economies and liberalized capital accounts 
in  recipient  economies. The debt  accumulation of 
private households is also strongly associated with 
price appreciation in real estate and stock markets, 
as occurred before the 2008 crisis.


It should be noted that private sector debt burdens
are  also  high  in  other  economies  that  do  not  cur-
rently exhibit a strong role for private demand, such 
as India, Turkey and the United Kingdom. As noted 
above,  these  economies  seem  to  be  experiencing 
domestic demand deflation, which weakens growth 


prospects even as it does not resolve issues of finan-
cial vulnerability.


Finally,  there  are  four  countries / country  groups 
where  the government  is  the main growth driver. 
Of these, as noted above, in Saudi Arabia the con-
tribution of external demand feeds the strong role 
of public sector demand, and fiscal expansion has 
been strongly dependent on oil revenues. Patterns 
like  this, which  can  also  be  found  among  other 
commodity and oil exporters (such as those in sub-
Saharan Africa included in this section of the table, 
as well as other developing countries in Asia and 
Latin America) reflect “windfall gain cycles” where 
the inflows from abroad are partly channelled to pay 
for increases in government spending. In “normal” 
times, the actual contribution of the public sector 
to growth is moderate or low in the economies in 
this  section of  the  table, as  it  is  in  those  in other 
sections,  except  for  a  couple  of  cases where  the 
contribution  to  growth  is  above  2  per  cent. This 
confirms the observation made in TDR 2017 about
the unjustifiable shift to continuing fiscal austerity 
in many countries, precisely in a period when other 
growth  drivers  have  been weak  or  contribute  to 
greater financial vulnerability.


1. Developed countries


Amid  signs  of  a  loss  of momentum  in  the  global 
economy,  the United States  is  a partial  exception. 
Europe  and  Japan,  after  showing promise of  con-
sistently  positive  and  significant  rates  of  growth, 
have seen growth rates  fall. But  the United States 
appears to be staying on course. Although the latest 
annualized growth estimates for the first quarter of 
2018 have been revised down to 2.2 per cent, second 
quarter estimates show growth rebounding to 4.1 per 
cent. By May 2018, the United States economy had 
experienced the second-longest phase of expansion 
since the 1850s, according to figures released by the 
National Bureau of Economic Research. However, 
even in the United States, the 16 quarters of unin-
terrupted positive GDP growth had not yet restored 
the quarterly growth rate to its previous post-crisis 
high. Moreover,  the  pace  of  the  expansion was 
slower than in many expansionary episodes in the


past,  and  the  slowest  in  the  post-war  period. The 
current Administration’s ambition is to use tax cuts 
to the tune of $1.5 trillion, higher import tariffs and 
a  promised  increase  in  infrastructural  spending  to 
raise the rate of growth from around 2 to 3 per cent 
per annum.


The sharp fall in the unemployment rate in the United
States, from close to 10 per cent in the middle of the 
crisis to 4.0 per cent in June 2018, is seen as evidence 
of  the  strength  of  recovery. This  is  significantly 
below the 5 per cent level recorded in January 2008, 
before the onset of the crisis, and the lowest since 
2000. However, doubts have been expressed about 
the meaning of these figures, since the definition of 
employment is such that even the underemployed, or 
workers employed for less than the 40 hours a week 
they are willing to work, are treated as employed.14
Furthermore, paradoxically, the low unemployment 
rate also decreased as a result of the deterioration


E. Regional growth trends




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


16


of the labour market during the crisis: facing long-
term unemployment, many workers abandoned the 
search for a job, leaving the labour force. This drove 
down the unemployment rate. Confirming this trend, 
the employment rate – which measures the ratio of 
employed workers to total population – is still lower 
than before the crisis (at 59 per cent in 2017, com-
pared to 61 per cent in 2005). Recent data indicate 
that this trend is reversing as formerly “discouraged” 
workers  re-enter  the  labour market  attracted  by 
its  improved conditions. How  this will  impact  the 
unemployment rate remains to be seen.


Nominal wage growth in the United States has been 
well  below  its  pre-crisis  high  and  the  pick-up  in 
wage growth from early 2015 lost momentum from 
the second half of 2016 (figure 1.12). Together with 
cheap imports and subdued oil prices, this has kept 
the inflation rate in the United States low. As noted by 
the Economic Policy Institute, “Until nominal wages 
are rising by 3.5 percent to 4 percent, there is no threat 
that price inflation will begin to significantly exceed 
the Fed’s 2 percent  inflation  target.”15 Overall,  the 
assessment that the United States is on a new robust
growth path which would  raise wages  and  trigger 
inflation is not grounded in the data.


Beyond the United States, optimism about the global 
economy was related to expectations that Europe
would begin to experience a robust recovery as well 
– but such expectations have been muted because of 


the slowdown in growth in the first quarter of 2018
Growth  in  the  euro  area, which  rose  from 1.8  to 
2.5  per  cent  per  cent  between  2016  and  2017,  is 
projected to drop to 1.9 per cent in 2018 (table 1.4). 
Explanations for faster growth in 2017 flagged the 
unconventional monetary easing measures adopted 
by the European Central Bank since early 2015 and 
the beneficial effects on  trade of higher growth  in 
China, India and the United States. Conversely, the 
slowdown is attributed to the blunting of the stimu-
lus offered by quantitative easing, depressed wage 
growth (Jezard, 2018), and the inadequacy of external 
demand to make up the shortfall.


Within the eurozone, there is generalized evidence 
of a slowdown, including in the largest two econo-
mies, Germany  and France. Germany  (accounting 
for 30 per  cent of  the  zone’s output)  saw quarter-
on-quarter growth rates falling from 0.6 per cent in 
the  last quarter of 2017 to 0.3 per cent  in  the first 
quarter of 2018, according to figures from the Federal 
Statistical Office in early May. Slower trade growth 
played a role there. France also suffered a setback. 
GDP grew by only 0.2 per cent in the first and the 
second  quarters  of  2018,  after  expanding  0.6  per 
cent  in  the  last  quarter  of  2017. Elsewhere,  Italy 
and Spain saw economic performance affected by
extremely high bond yields, resulting from investor 
fears  triggered  by  adverse  economic  and political 
developments. These psychological effects contrib-
uted to the persistence of austerity policies in the two
countries. Overall, therefore, the news from Europe 
is looking less rosy after the optimism generated by 
the performance in 2017.


Growth  in  the United Kingdom  is  expected  to  be 
lower in 2018 compared to 2017, with uncertainty 
over Brexit negotiations adding to structural weak-
nesses  reflected  in weak  productivity  growth  and 
sluggish business investment. Even more pessimis-
tic news came from Japan, which had appeared to 
be finally coming out of a  long  recession because 
of  a  combination  of  fiscal  stimuli  and  aggressive 
monetary easing. When the Japanese economy grew 
by 0.6 per cent in the last quarter of 2017, that was 
the eighth straight quarter of positive growth, mark-
ing  the  longest  expansionary  stretch  in  28  years. 
However, the optimism that was generated thereby 
was dashed when estimates for  the first quarter of 
2018 showed that  the Japanese economy had con-
tracted by 0.2 per cent over the three months ending 
March 2018. Expectations now are that lower than 
expected  consumption  spending  and  exports will 


FIGURE 1.12 United States private-sector nominal
average hourly earnings, 2007–2018
(Year-on-year percentage change)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on U.S. Bureau of Labour
Statistics, nominal wage data.


1.0


1.5


2.0


2.5


3.0


3.5


4.0


2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


17


reduce Japanese growth closer to 1 per cent in 2018 
as compared to 1.7 per cent in 2017.


As  noted  earlier,  despite  the  signs  of  a  loss  of 
momentum  that  challenge  the  claims  of  a  robust 
growth path in the advanced nations, central banks 
in most of these countries are choosing to withdraw 
the easy money and low interest policies that they
have pursued for such an extended period. This has 
affected the extent to which the hesitant recovery in
some advanced nations and the accompanying com-
modity price increase can deliver a return to stable
growth in the rest of the world.


2. Transition economies


The transition economies that are members of the
Commonwealth of  Independent States  (CIS)  have 
been  recovering  from  two years of no or negative 
growth. They  recorded  a  strong  rebound  in  2017, 
with growth of 2 per cent, as compared with 0.2 per 
cent in 2016. That figure is expected to marginally 
improve in 2018. An important factor underlying the 
recovery was an increase in commodity prices, espe-
cially of oil, which accounts for close to 60 per cent 
of merchandise exports from the Russian Federation. 
The  spike  in  oil  prices  improved both  the  current 


TABLE 1.4  World output growth, 1991–2018
(Annual percentage change)


Country or area
1991–
2000a


2001–
2008a 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018b


World 2.8 3.5 1.9 -1.8 4.3 3.1 2.5 2.6 2.8 2.8 2.5 3.1 3.1
Developed countries 2.6 2.2 0.1 -3.6 2.6 1.5 1.1 1.2 1.9 2.3 1.7 2.3 2.1
of which:


Japan 1.3 1.2 -1.1 -5.4 4.2 -0.1 1.5 2.0 0.4 1.4 1.0 1.7 0.9
United States 3.6 2.5 -0.3 -2.8 2.5 1.6 2.2 1.7 2.6 2.9 1.5 2.2 2.7
European Union (EU-28) 2.2 2.2 0.5 -4.4 2.1 1.7 -0.4 0.3 1.7 2.3 2.0 2.5 2.0
of which:


Eurozone 2.1 1.9 0.5 -4.5 2.1 1.6 -0.9 -0.2 1.3 2.1 1.8 2.5 1.9
France 2.0 1.8 0.2 -2.9 2.0 2.1 0.2 0.6 0.9 1.1 1.2 2.2 1.5
Germany 1.7 1.3 1.1 -5.6 4.1 3.7 0.5 0.5 1.9 1.7 1.9 2.5 2.0
Italy 1.6 1.0 -1.0 -5.5 1.7 0.6 -2.8 -1.7 0.1 1.0 0.9 1.6 1.3


United Kingdom 2.7 2.5 -0.5 -4.2 1.7 1.5 1.5 2.1 3.1 2.3 1.9 1.8 1.2
European Union Member States
after 2004 1.9 5.0 3.7 -3.4 1.7 3.1 0.6 1.2 3.0 3.8 3.1 4.6 4.0


Transition economies -4.9 7.2 5.3 -6.6 4.8 4.7 3.3 2.0 1.0 -2.2 0.3 2.1 2.2
of which:


Russian Federation -4.7 6.8 5.2 -7.8 4.5 4.3 3.5 1.3 0.7 -2.8 -0.2 1.5 1.7
Developing countries 4.8 6.3 5.5 2.6 7.8 6.1 5.0 5.0 4.5 4.0 3.9 4.4 4.6


Africa 2.6 5.8 5.5 3.4 5.4 1.3 5.9 2.3 3.7 3.3 1.7 3.0 3.5
North Africa, excl. the Sudan and
South Sudan 2.9 5.0 6.4 3.6 4.3 -6.1 9.7 -3.5 1.3 4.2 3.1 5.2 4.6
Sub-Saharan Africa, excl. South Africa 2.7 7.0 6.0 5.3 7.0 5.0 5.3 5.4 5.6 3.6 1.3 2.6 3.8
South Africa 2.1 4.4 3.2 -1.5 3.0 3.3 2.2 2.5 1.7 1.3 0.6 1.2 1.1


Latin America and the Caribbean 3.1 3.8 4.0 -1.9 5.9 4.4 2.8 2.8 1.0 -0.3 -1.1 1.1 1.7
Caribbean 2.2 5.1 2.6 -0.9 3.0 2.2 2.2 2.7 2.8 3.9 1.5 2.1 2.7
Central America, excl. Mexico 4.4 4.5 4.3 -0.7 3.9 5.4 4.8 3.7 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.7 3.7
Mexico 3.2 2.2 1.1 -5.3 5.1 3.7 3.6 1.4 2.8 3.3 2.7 2.3 2.1
South America 3.0 4.3 5.0 -1.0 6.4 4.7 2.6 3.2 0.3 -1.7 -2.6 0.6 1.4
of which:


Brazil 2.8 3.7 5.1 -0.1 7.5 4.0 1.9 3.0 0.5 -3.5 -3.5 1.0 1.4
Asia 6.3 7.5 6.1 4.3 8.8 7.4 5.6 6.1 5.7 5.4 5.7 5.5 5.5


East Asia 8.7 9.0 7.7 7.0 9.9 8.3 6.7 6.8 6.5 5.9 5.9 6.2 6.0
of which:


China 10.6 10.9 9.7 9.4 10.6 9.5 7.9 7.8 7.3 6.9 6.7 6.9 6.7
South Asia 4.8 6.7 4.5 4.1 8.8 5.3 2.6 4.8 6.3 5.8 8.4 5.7 6.1
of which:


India 6.0 7.6 6.2 5.0 11.0 6.2 4.8 6.1 7.0 7.6 7.9 6.2 7.0
South-East Asia 4.9 5.6 4.4 2.0 7.8 4.9 5.9 5.1 4.5 4.6 4.6 5.2 4.8
West Asia 4.1 5.7 4.1 -1.9 6.0 8.6 4.9 6.2 3.4 4.2 3.1 3.0 3.3


Oceania 2.7 2.8 0.3 2.0 5.8 1.7 2.4 2.6 6.9 5.2 2.4 2.3 2.4


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA), National Accounts Main
Aggregates database and World Economic Situation and Prospects: Update as of mid-2018; ECLAC, 2018; OECD.Stat, available at : https://
stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=EO (accessed 18 June 2018); IMF, 2018; Economist Intelligence Unit, EIU CountryData database;
J.P.Morgan, Global Data Watch; and national sources.


Note: Calculations for country aggregates are based on GDP at constant 2010 dollars.
a Average.
b Forecasts.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


18


account on the balance of payments and the revenues
of the Government in the Russian Federation. The 
result was a transition from recession (contraction
of 2.8 per cent in 2015 and 0.2 per cent in 2016) to 
recovery  in  2017, when growth was  1.5  per  cent. 
This is likely to move closer to 1.7 per cent in 2018.


That recovery should benefit the whole of the CIS, 
as the Russian Federation accounts for 80 per cent of 
GDP of the region and is its principal growth driver 
as a major source of import demand and remittances 
for other countries in the CIS. The other CIS coun-
tries  are  also  likely  to  benefit  from  loan-financed 
infrastructure  spending  under  the Belt  and Road 
Initiative in China. However, dramatic improvements 
in performance on the back of higher oil prices are 
unlikely, because of the dampening effects of auster-
ity programmes of some of these economies.


The growth dynamics of  the  transition  economies 
in South-Eastern Europe is determined by the per-
formance of the European Union, which consumes 
anywhere between half and 80 per cent of exports 
from these economies. Uncertainties in Europe can 
affect the pace of GDP growth in this region. Still 
expectations are that growth would accelerate from 
2.3 per cent in 2017 to around 3 per cent in 2018.


While  oil-exporting  countries  have  obtained  a 
temporary reprieve from balance-of-payments dif-
ficulties and currency depreciations, current account 
deficits persist in many countries such as Georgia and 
Ukraine. Since these deficits are financed by capital 
inflows, increases in global interest rates can reduce 
flows, increase balance-of-payments stress and trig-
ger  currency  depreciation. Vulnerability  persists 
within the improved growth scenario.


3. Latin America


Having benefited from the recovery from recession 
in two large economies in the region (Argentina and 
Brazil), the rise in commodity prices, and a conse-
quent 3 per cent improvement in the terms of trade, 
Latin American economies recorded higher growth in 
2017, especially in relation to the slowdown starting 
2015. The recovery is expected to continue with GDP 
growth in Latin America and the Caribbean projected 
at around 1.7 per cent in 2018, compared to 1.1 per 
cent  in  2017  (table  1.4). All  countries  benefited 
from the higher prices, though price increases were 


particularly sharp in the case of hydrocarbons and
oil derivatives, iron ore and soya bean.


The biggest economy in the region, Brazil, recorded 
positive expansion of 1 per cent in 2017, after con-
traction amounting  to 7 per cent of GDP over  the 
previous  two years. This  growth  from a  low base 
persisted in early 2018, although signs of deceleration 
(partly precipitated by a  truckers’  strike) appeared 
in  the  second quarter,  creating uncertainties  about 
the pace of recovery for the remainder of the year. 
The year-on-year growth in 2018 is projected to be 
around 1.4 per cent.


Until recently, Brazil was attracting attention because 
of the weakness of its currency. The real depreciated 
significantly over the first six months of 2018. The 
pace of depreciation was moderated only by the issue
of currency swaps by the central bank (under which 
investors receive interest at the benchmark Selic rate, 
but are promised compensation for any fall in the
value of the real against the dollar). This combina-
tion of a hedge against currency depreciation and a 
reasonable Selic interest rate kept investments flow-
ing in, especially given the carry trade opportunities 
that exist when the spread between United States
rates and the Selic is high. However, low inflation 
rates encouraged the Government to bring down the 
Selic  rate  from 14.25 per cent  in October 2016  to 
6.5 per cent in March 2018, at a time when interest 
rates in the United States were being nudged upward. 
In addition, lower volatility encouraged the central 
bank  to  reduce  the volume of  swaps  issued,  from 
well over $100 billion to less than $25 billion. Once 
these measures that supported the carry trade were
diluted, the real could not hold and even became the 
target of a speculative attack. The fall of the currency 
stalled only when the central bank president declared 
that he could “intensify” the use of swaps. A sharp 
depreciation of the currency can trigger a currency 
crisis and destabilize financial markets with adverse 
external effects on the real economy. Particularly hard 
hit would be firms with debt denominated in foreign 
currencies, with bankruptcies and asset-price deflation 
which could hold back investment. And if the central 
bank decides to hike interest rates sharply to prevent 
foreign investor exit and capital flight, the investment 
climate would worsen further. But the low deficit on 
the current account, not-too-high external debt and 
significant  foreign  reserves of  around $380 billion 
give Brazil  some  ammunition  to weather  possible 
external turbulence in the second half of 2018.




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


19


External  vulnerability  appears  greater  in Mexico, 
which experienced a drop  in  the GDP growth rate 
to 2.3 per cent in 2017 from 2.7 per cent in 2016, 
partly because of the adoption of a conservative
fiscal stance and partly because of the uncertainties 
surrounding NAFTA. However, seasonally adjusted 
GDP growth in the first quarter of 2018 accelerated 
recording a 1.1 per cent increase relative to the previ-
ous quarter. This may be under challenge because of 
the imposition of higher tariffs by the United States 
on  a  range  of  imports  from Mexico. Growth  can 
also be adversely affected because of an increase in
interest rates from already high levels, necessitated 
by  rising  interest  rates  in  the United States  and  a 
substantially depreciated  currency.  If  rates  are not 
raised, capital flight could severely damage the cur-
rency. However, a more proactive fiscal stance on the 
part of the newly elected Government could increase 
domestic demand.


The Central American  countries  have  performed 
reasonably well in terms of growth. While the GDP 
growth rate of the subregion came down marginally 
from 4.1 to 3.9 per cent between 2015 and 2016, it 
dropped to 3.7 per cent in 2017 and is estimated to be 
at that level in 2018 as well. The Caribbean, on the 
other hand, has seen a rise in growth rates from 1.5 to 
2.1 per cent between 2016 and 2017, and is projected 
to grow at a significantly higher 2.7 per cent in 2018.


Interestingly, the danger of retreat by foreign inves-
tors  seems  to  affect  almost  all  emerging market 
economies,  irrespective  of  their  recent  economic 
performance. In some countries where the effects on 
the currency have already been significant, interest 
rates have been hiked up – to as much as 40 per cent 
for  foreign  investors  in Argentina. The  damaging 
effects this can have on domestic investment and
growth should be obvious.


4. West Asia


Growth in West Asia in 2017 was at its lowest in the 
post-crisis  period,  as  low oil  prices  and voluntary 
production  restraints  affected  income  growth  in 
the  oil-producing  countries,  and  political  condi-
tions adversely affected economic performance in
countries like the Syrian Arab Republic and Yemen. 
Strikingly, GDP  in Kuwait  and Saudi Arabia  con-
tracted by 3.2  and 0.7 per  cent  respectively. This, 
however, is likely to change in 2018, given the sharp 


increase in oil prices and the positive effect that
would have on budgetary revenues and expenditures. 
However, such gains may be partly neutralized by 
the need to keep production low to prevent oil prices 
from returning to their earlier lows. Overall, growth 
is  likely  to  accelerate  in  all member  states  of  the 
GCC (Cooperation Council  for  the Arab States of 
the Gulf),  namely Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, 
Saudi Arabia  and  the United Arab Emirates. This 
would have knock-on effects on other countries in 
the  region  as well,  through  increased  trade flows, 
remittances and capital flows.


In Turkey, however, growth is likely to decelerate. 
The Turkish lira depreciated by more than a third over 
the year ending mid-June 2018, as foreign investors 
began to pull out capital from the country. Turkey, 
like Argentina, illustrates the dangers associated with 
an open capital account. The Government and central 
bank have responded by repeatedly raising interest 
rates, which touched 17.8 per cent in June 2018, the 
highest since the financial crisis a decade back. Yet 
depreciation has continued, with potentially damag-
ing consequences. Turkish private sector companies 
that are reportedly saddled with close to $340 bil-
lion of foreign currency debt in mid-2018 are being 
severely  hit  by  the  sharp  deceleration  of  the  lira, 
threatening bankruptcies and slowing investment and 
growth. Investment is also likely to be held back by 
the high interest rates following hikes of as much as 
500 basis points over a short span of less than two 
months.


In the Islamic Republic of Iran, the decision of the 
United States to withdraw from the nuclear deal
and reimpose sanctions is likely to adversely affect 
economic performance, as the country had just man-
aged to move to steady growth after suffering many 
years of sanctions. Importers of oil from the Islamic 
Republic of Iran are likely to shift to other sources, 
affecting revenues and foreign exchange availability. 
Sanctions on  the  Iranian  energy  sector  halved  the 
country’s oil exports, to around 1.1 million barrels 
per day, in 2013. After the easing of sanctions, the 
Islamic Republic  of  Iran  currently  exports  around 
2.5 million  barrels  daily. That  trend may well  be 
reversed. Imports into the Islamic Republic of Iran 
are also likely to be hit. Meanwhile, uncertainty has 
seen the rial depreciating. While the official rate is 
around 42,000 rials to the dollar, the black market 
rate was reportedly ruling at more than double that 
at the end of June 2018.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


20


5. Developing Africa


After having experienced a rise in the average growth 
rate from 1.7 to 3.0 per cent between 2016 and 2017, 
developing  countries  on  the African  continent  are 
projected to grow at 3.5 per cent in 2018. A major fac-
tor in this recovery is the reversal of the commodity
price decline, which is crucial for this set of countries 
given their dependence on commodity exports. The 
rise in oil prices particularly benefits countries like 
Algeria, Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo, 
Ghana and Nigeria.


Growth rates and growth drivers varied across  the 
continent, with  the  less  resource-dependent  East 
African  subregion  continuing  to  record  higher 
annual  rates  of  growth  of more  than  5  per  cent, 
largely because of performance in countries such as 
Djibouti, Ethiopia, Uganda and the United Republic 
of Tanzania. The other two subregions with comfort-
able growth rates are Northern Africa, helped in large 
measure by growth in Egypt, and Western Africa with 
many economies, such as Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte 
d’Ivoire, Ghana and Guinea,  recording  reasonably 
high growth. The two worst performing subregions 
are Middle Africa and Southern Africa.


Factors driving growth included, besides increased 
commodity prices,  increased  infrastructure  invest-
ments. However, much of  the  expenditure driving 
growth was  funded with  borrowing  from  abroad 
in many  cases,  resulting  in  a  return  of  the  “high 
indebtedness”  problem. By  the  late  2000s,  debt 
relief  programmes  had  substantially  reduced  the 
debt  burden of African  countries. But  since  then, 
countries have accumulated new debt and a number
of African  countries  are  currently being  identified 
as being debt-distressed. With international interest 
rates set to rise, the health of these economies could 
deteriorate quickly.


Nigeria, the largest economy in Africa, saw a return to 
moderate growth in 2018, after two years of contrac-
tion and stagnation. Growth in 2018 is projected at 
2.5 per cent as compared with negative 1.6 per cent 
in 2016 and 0.8 per cent in 2017. When oil prices 
collapsed  after  2014, Nigeria was  badly  hit, with 
falling state revenues (as oil accounts for 90 per cent 
of federal revenues), rising fiscal and trade deficits, 
and a recession. The reversal of the oil price decline 
has restored growth and improved conditions, with 
the volatility pointing to the need for economic diver-
sification. However, while growth in the first quarter 


of 2018, at 1.95 per cent, was a major improvement 
over the 0.91 per cent contraction in the first quarter 
of 2017, it was a dip from the 2.11 per cent year-on-
year growth recorded in the fourth quarter of 2017, 
pointing to the tenuous nature of the recovery.


South Africa, the second largest economy in Africa, 
saw an improvement in its low rate of growth last 
year, with GDP increasing from 0.6 per cent in 2016 
to 1.2 per cent  in 2017, but growth is projected at 
1.1  per  cent  in  2018  (table  1.4). The  fact  that  the 
economy is not out of the woods was brought home 
when GDP contracted by 2.2 per cent in the first annu-
alized quarter of 2018. Agricultural GDP contracted 
by 24.2 per cent, which reportedly was the largest 
quarter-on-quarter  fall  in  12 years. Manufacturing 
GDP  also  contracted  by  6.4  per  cent. Underlying 
this  volatility  is  low growth  in  the medium  term, 
with GDP growth rates never exceeding 2.5 per cent 
in any quarter over the last four years, and touching 
zero or negative levels in two, and around 1 per cent 
in many quarters.


A fundamental and well-recognized failure of South 
Africa is its inability to diversify out of mining into 
manufacturing. In fact, gross value added in manu-
facturing fell from around 21 per cent in the early 
1990s to around 13 per cent in 2016. While the ratio 
of  gross  value  added  in mining  to GDP declined, 
the  sector  that  has  gained  is Finance, Real Estate 
and Business Services, in the case of which the ratio 
of gross value added to GDP rose from close to 16 
to 23 per cent. Underlying this  increase  is a sharp 
increase in capital flows into the country, facilitated 
by  an  increasingly  open  capital  account. Between 
2008 and 2016 foreign investment flows into South 
Africa rose (in rand terms) by 250 per cent, because 
of a 230 per cent increase in direct investment and a 
350 per cent increase in portfolio inflows. One con-
sequence was a relative strengthening of the South 
African rand, which appreciated (while fluctuating) 
from 15.1  rand  to  the dollar  in  June 2016  to 11.8 
in March 2018 (or by more than 20 per cent). This 
underscores the dilemma of developing countries in 
currency markets: both appreciation and deprecia-
tion bring with  them different  problems.  In South 
Africa, the recent appreciation is hardly conducive 
to the growth of production in either agriculture or 
manufacturing, and so the result has been slow and 
volatile output growth.


Egypt, the third largest economy in Africa, was res-
cued from a crisis because of the benefits of increased 




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


21


production and exports of natural gas, especially from 
new fields such as the Zohr gas field. Egypt claims to 
have completed four important gas extraction projects 
in 2017 to add 1.6 billion cubic feet of gas per day 
to its production. Partly as a result of that, despite 
being faced with a balance-of-payments crisis and a 
collapse of its currency which forced it to approach
the IMF for a $12 billion line of credit in November 
2016, Egypt has been registering reasonable rates of 
growth of 4.3 and 5.1 per cent in 2016 and 2017 and 
is expected to grow at 5.4 per cent in 2018.


In 2016, the Egyptian Government was faced with 
a  current  account  deficit  of  7  per  cent  of GDP 
and  foreign  reserves were  running  out. While  the 
Government sought to keep the exchange rate of the 
Egyptian pound stable, black markets rates relative 
to  the  dollar  rose,  and  remittances  fell  sharply  in 
the expectation of a devaluation. Between 2011 and 
2014 the growth rate hovered at around 2 per cent 
and  the unemployment  rate was more  than 12 per 
cent, with the figure at more than 40 per cent among 
the 15–24 age group who constituted one fifth of the 
population  in  2010. The  external  economic  crisis 
forced  the Government  to  turn  to  the  IMF, which 
focused  on  the  fiscal  deficit  of  12  per  cent,  the 
public debt to GDP ratio, and the pegged exchange 
rate. In return for an IMF loan, Egypt agreed to cut 
fuel, electricity and food subsidies sharply and float 
the Egyptian pound (which depreciated from 8.8 to 
the United States  dollar  in October  2016  to  16  in 
November and 18.5 by January 2017). Fiscal auster-
ity increased unemployment and the currency float 
triggered inflation of more than 25 per cent early in 
2018, but growth was buoyed by the discovery of gas 
reserves and increased exports of gas and petroleum 
products. Rising oil prices and a devaluation-support-
ed increase in non-petroleum exports helped as well, 
to some extent concealing a situation of continuing 
economic vulnerability.


6. Developing Asia


After recording GDP growth rates of 5.7 and 5.5 per 
cent in 2016 and 2017, the developing countries in 
Asia  are  expected  to  sustain  that  rate  in  2018  as 
well. This is partly because while growth in China 
is expected to decelerate from 6.9 in 2017 to 6.7 per 
cent in 2018, in India it is expected to rise from 6.2 
to 7 per cent. However, first quarter growth in China 
beat expectations, coming in at 6.8 per cent – the third 
straight quarter of growth at that rate. Growth in the 


second quarter was marginally lower at 6.7 per cent. 
The deceleration in China was in substantial measure
the result of the process of deleveraging pushed by 
the Government to address the credit bubble. Total 
social  financing,  or  the  sum  total  of  official  and 
shadow bank lending, reportedly fell by 14 per cent 
(or by $110 billion) in the first four months of 2018
This  is  reflective of  a medium-term  trend. This  is 
because of a fall in lending by the shadow banking 
sector,  the share of which  in  total social financing 
came down from close to 50 per cent to 15 per cent. 
It had been 8 per cent in 2002. Shadow bank lending 
fell by 64 per cent  in yuan renminbi  terms during 
January to April 2018 as compared to the same period 
the previous year (by $274 billion in United States 
dollar terms). Total social financing which averaged 
two times GDP in the period from 2002 to 2008, rose 
to 3.2 times in the context of the post-crisis stimulus. 
It fell to 2.4 times GDP over 2014 to 2017 (Hodges 
and van Scheltinga, 2018). An example of what this 
does to demand comes through from the evidence that 
automobile loans that grew by more than 50 per cent 
in 2009 and around 33 per cent in 2010, had risen by 
just 3 per cent in the first four months of 2018.


An important driver of the deleveraging process has 
been the adoption of a strategy of rebalancing that 
reduces the role of public and private investment
financed by debt in driving growth. The ratio of gross 
capital formation to GDP, which peaked at 48 per cent 
in 2011 had come down to 44.4 per cent by 2017. 
Rebalancing has also reduced the role of net exports 
in driving GDP growth. The ratio of net exports to 
GDP came down from 8.6 per cent in 2007 to 1 per 
cent  in 2014, rose to 3.4 per cent  in 2015 and fell 
again  to 0.7 per cent  in 2017. The result has been 
a slowing of growth in China, as a result of which 
growth in East Asia that rose from 5.9 to 6.2 per cent 
between 2016 and 2017 is expected to fall back to 
its 2016 level in 2018. Similarly, growth in South-
East Asia is expected to drop from 5.2 per cent level 
recorded in 2017 to 4.8 per cent this year.


Meanwhile, with a GDP growth of 7.7 per cent year-
on-year in the first quarter of 2018, India is currently 
among the world’s fastest growing economies. The 
year-on-year quarterly growth rates have risen from 
5.6  per  cent  in  the  first  quarter  of  financial  year 
(April–March) 2017/18 to 6.3, 7.0 and 7.7 per cent in 
the subsequent three quarters pointing to an accelera-
tion of growth. But this is at variance with the story 
emerging from the annual figures. If annual rates are 
considered,  the GDP growth rate fell from 7.1 per 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


22


cent in 2016/17 to 6.7 per cent in 2017/18. Growing 
demand for exports has led to a moderate recovery in
industrial production, although the effects of demon-
etization  are  still  evident  in  private  consumption 
trends within  the  economy. The  resulting  increase 
in capacity utilization in manufacturing along with 
a recapitalization of public banks has enabled a rise 
in investment for the first time in several years. But 
at the same time, a disconcerting feature is the decel-
eration of growth in the primary sectors. The service 
sector is expanding with trade, hotels, transport and 
communication leading the way. 


A lending spree by  the banking system during  the 
high growth years  has  led  to  the  accumulation  of 
large volumes of bad debt or non-performing assets 
in the balance sheets of leading banks. This, besides 
threatening financial stability, is curbing credit expan-
sion and is likely to adversely affect investment and 
growth. Further, the Indian rupee is under pressure on 
foreign exchange markets. Over the first five months 
of 2018 the currency had depreciated by more than 
7.5 per cent relative to the dollar. Depreciation rela-
tive to other major currencies like the British pound, 
the euro and the yen, has been much less. Yet, the 
fall vis-à-vis the dollar is of significance, especially 
since much of the trade and foreign debt of India is 
denominated in dollars. A leading determinant of the 
depreciation is the rise in the current account deficit 
on the balance of payments of India intensified by the 
sharp rise in the international price of oil. 


A similar picture  is emerging  in Pakistan. Despite 
robust growth, the currency has lost a quarter of its 
value against  the dollar since the beginning of  the 
year. Higher oil prices have led to a widening trade 
deficit and foreign exchange reserves have dropped 
sharply. A widening external debt position, currently 
standing at $92 billion or 31 per cent of GDP has 
raised concerns about its sustainability. Expectations 
are  that  the new government has no choice but  to 
turn to the IMF for a large loan, which would require 
adopting austerity measures that are likely to affect 
growth adversely. Over the medium term, much will 
depend on whether large infrastructure projects will 
support a stronger export push.


Growth in ASEAN countries remains stable in the 
light of strong domestic demand, rising private con-
sumption, and infrastructure investments (especially 
in countries such as Indonesia and the Philippines). 
But concerns are rising that these trends can be over-
shadowed by  sluggishness  in  the  global  economy 


and  the worsening  of  trade  relations  between  the 
United  States  and China,  both  of which  are  key 
export markets  for many  countries  in  the  region. 
In addition, as elsewhere in emerging markets, the 
build-up of household and corporate debt is a source
of vulnerability. Since 2010, Cambodia, Indonesia, 
Malaysia, Myanmar,  the Philippines and Thailand 
have increased their non-financial sector debt ratios 
by  an  average  of  almost  20  percentage  points. 
Growth in Indonesia which stood at a comfortable 
5.1 per cent in 2017, is officially estimated at 5.1 per 
cent in the first quarter of 2018 as well. The effects 
of monetary  tightening  in  the United  States  and 
elsewhere threaten the sustainability of this pace of
growth,  despite  the  benefits  from  improved  com-
modity prices.


Benefiting from a revival of exports of information 
technology products, especially memory chips, the 
Republic of Korea registered improved export growth 
in the first quarter of 2018, which helped take GDP 
growth to 1.1 per cent, as compared with a contrac-
tion of 0.2 per cent in the last quarter of 2017. The 
new Government elected in 2017 on a redistributive 
platform has  raised  the minimum hourly wage by 
16 per cent and promises to create more jobs, reduce 
working hours and push for permanency for contract 
workers. This could trigger some wage-led expan-
sion, which, combined with the pick-up in exports, 
can raise growth even more. Similar growth trends 
are visible elsewhere in South-East Asia. Thailand, 
too, has registered a better-than-expected 4.8 per cent 
GDP growth rate in the first quarter of 2018, after 
having grown at 3.9 per cent in 2017, which was the 
highest since 2013. Here, too, improved exports and 
increased tourism revenues played a role.


On  the whole,  across Asia  the  problem  is  not  so 
much a weakening of growth, as  fear  that  interest 
rate increases and monetary tightening could trigger 
capital outflows,  leading  to financial and currency 
instability. Combined with the effects of rising protec-
tionism in the United States and possible responses, 
this could adversely impact growth resulting in levels 
lower than initially predicted.


7. Growth in an environment of instability


Across  the  transition, emerging market and devel-
oping  countries,  two  tendencies  are  visible.  First, 
there are some positive trends in some countries, in 
the form of the probable continuation during 2018 




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


23


BOX 1.1 Global scenarios: From toiling to troubling


In the baseline projections for the global economy all countries are assumed to keep their current policy stances 
unchanged through to 2023. Based on information available in 2018, fiscal policy is assumed to remain as 
observed in section D, with notable trends towards tightening in France, Brazil and Indonesia and moderate 
expansion in the Republic of Korea and the United States. Expansionary monetary policy (both in the form of 
low interest rates and quantitative easing) is expected to continue, although at a more moderate pace, as renewed 
financial instability – possibly triggered by international disputes over trade and exchange rates – threatens 
global growth. In this baseline scenario, global GDP growth is projected to slow down to 2.9 per cent in 2018 
and hover around this rate through to 2023 (see appendix I.A for details).


The “trade war” scenario explores the consequences for the global economy of an escalation of recent tariff 
increases.  It  is  generally  recognized  that  the  immediate  impact  of  tariffs  on growth,  through  lower  trade 
volumes, is unlikely to be very large but that greater damage can come from increased uncertainty and the 
possible disruption to global supply chains (Eichengreen, 2018). In fact, ubiquitous calls to preserve or expand 
international market shares suggest that trade volumes might not significantly fall. However, even if trade 
volumes are unaffected, higher tariffs could still have serious consequences for global growth through their 
impact on income distribution and aggregate demand. To highlight this possibility, the scenario assumes that 
the government of each opposing party reimburses its exporters for any tariffs paid to foreign governments, 
thereby keeping exports and domestic prices at “pre-war” levels.


In this scenario, confrontation unfolds under four assumptions. First, three country blocs are assumed to face 
off; the United States is assumed to impose a 20 per cent tariff on all its imports from China and two thirds of 
its imports from Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Republic of Korea and the European Union. It is assumed that 
all countries retaliate with equivalent tariffs, dollar for dollar.


Second, all countries are assumed to fully indemnify their exporters for the tariffs paid to foreign governments, 
using the revenue obtained by taxing imports and, where this is not sufficient, general tax revenue. If this set 
of measures generates a positive net revenue, this is used towards principal payments on sovereign debt. For 
example, under the given assumptions it is estimated that in 2019 the United States Government will gain 
approximately $280 billion in tariff revenues and will transfer to United States exporting businesses an amount 
equal to $181 billion to compensate for the higher tariffs paid by them in Canada, China, Japan, Mexico, the 
Republic of Korea and the European Union – a version of the border adjustment tax. The net revenue for the 
United States will be $99 billion.


While trade flows remain unchanged, a large redistribution of resources is projected to take place: businesses 
will transfer resources to foreign governments (in the form of tariffs) and these will transfer them to their 
exporting businesses (in the form of reimbursements). Globally, the result of these flows is a transfer of resources 
between governments with some obtaining a net revenue and others a net loss.


Third, countries that suffer a net fiscal loss are assumed to resort to exchange rate depreciation in an attempt 
to gain competitiveness and increase their international market shares, expecting to compensate some of the 
tariff losses. In recent years, exchange rate targeting has been achieved through a variety of actions, including 
“managed floating”, quantitative easing and other forms of policy-driven liquidity expansions.


Fourth, labour shares are assumed to fall slightly as a form of “wartime” economic mobilization undercuts 
wage claims. Since the assumed policy mix of tariffs and export subsidies does not influence domestic prices, 
any changes in labour shares will be achieved through nominal wage cuts and increases of productivity passed 
through to profits.


The direct result of the redistribution of income towards profits will be a loss of domestic demand as workers’ 
reduced purchasing power forces them to cut consumption. But the fall of the labour share will also undermine 
domestic demand indirectly by sapping business confidence. Fearing more policy changes that may further 
compress private consumption (and corporate sales), businesses become less willing to invest.


A  “trade war”  is  projected  to  damage  growth  and  employment  and  to  increase  income  inequality  in  the 
countries involved, even in the case in which trade flows do not change. Moreover, in the current context 
of increasing financial fragility in several developing countries, a trade war may lead to even more serious 
consequences, through unruly capital movements. For example, increased exchange rate volatility could induce 
risk aversion and trigger capital flight as lenders and portfolio managers, following a well-rehearsed script, 
seek safer assets and higher margins of safety. This could lead to severe currency depreciations in a number of 
financially vulnerable developing countries and activate a spiralling sequence of declining investment, hikes 
in unemployment, falling consumption, inflating sovereign debts (when denominated in foreign currencies) 
and falling government spending. Full-blown financial panic would only be a few steps away. The global 
consequences would then depend on contagion forces which continue to be difficult to predict.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


24


of the higher growth recorded in 2017, and, in some 
cases, an improved current account situation at least 
until  the  recent  spike  in  oil  prices. Oil  exporters 
have benefited significantly from the sharp rise in oil 
prices. By contrast, oil importers, including those that 
gained from the rise in non-oil commodity prices, are 
increasingly under stress.


Second, there has already been depreciation of the 
value of national currencies, triggered by net capital 
outflows, especially in the so-called emerging mar-
kets. As discussed, these net capital outflows appear 
to have been precipitated by interest rate increases in
the developed countries, as a result of which the carry 
trade investments that had been undertaken in recent 
years are being unwound. A combination of interest 
rate increases and currency depreciations would sub-
ject the firms in countries that are exposed to foreign 
currency debts  to considerable stress. These could 
even lead to bankruptcies and asset-price deflation, 
with substantial adverse external effects on financial 
stability and growth.


The scenario then is one of instability in many forms. 
The likely emerging scenario, in the absence of quick 
proactive macropolicy measures by governments, is 
as follows:


  1. Net outflows of capital, especially of portfolio 
capital,  from  emerging markets,  are  triggered 
largely  by monetary  tightening  and  increases 
in interest rates in the United States and other
advanced countries.


  2.  The consequent depreciation of currencies is then 
worsened by speculative attacks, even as domes-
tic inflation is triggered by the depreciation.


  3. Debt service payments valued in domestic curren-
cy, on substantially increased corporate debt, rise 
sharply, precipitating default and bankruptcies.


  4.  This further depresses investment precisely at a 
time when it was expected to revive.


As long as the medium-term scenario is one shaped by 
fiscal conservatism which depresses economic activ-
ity, governments in both developed and developing 
countries are then left hoping for a robust recovery 
– but never experiencing one. Instead, they are more 
likely to face a repeat of the instability and crises of 
a  decade  ago. This  could be made  even worse by 
ongoing tensions in the trading system (box 1.1 and 
appendix I.A). In an interdependent global economy, 
inward-looking policies do not offer a way forward; 
substantial and coordinated shifts in macroeconomic
strategy appear to be the only way out of this trap.


1  The January 2018 edition of the IMF World Economic
Outlook noted: “Some 120 economies, accounting 
for three quarters of world GDP, have seen a pickup 
in growth in year-on-year terms in 2017, the broadest 
synchronized global growth upsurge since 2010.” By 
April 2018, when the IMF issued the next edition of 
the World Economic Outlook, the prognosis was even 
better.


2  htpp://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/2995521 
/8897618/2-15052018-BP-EN.pdf/defecccc-f9 
d9-4636-b7f8-d401357aca46.


3  The average growth of real government expenditure 
of developed countries during the post-crisis period 
(excluding the extraordinary stimuli of 2009/10) was 
a mere 0.6 per cent, far short of the pre-crisis figure.


4  Figures are derived from the United Nations Global 
Policy Model and based on national statistics and 
United Nations Statistics Division records.


5  Bank for International Settlements (BIS) statistics 
obtained  from:  https://stats.bis.org/statx/srs/table/
f4.1.


6  Figures from the WTO database at: https://www.wto.
org/english/res_e/statis_e/merch_trade_stat_e.htm.


7  Centraal Planbureau, The Netherlands, https://www.
cpb.nl/en/data.


8  Data on trade in services described in this paragraph 
come  from UNCTADstat  and  correspond  to  the 
concepts and definitions in IMF, 2009.


9  http://databank.worldbank.org/data/databases/
commodity-price-data.


10  The  notion  of  “aggregate  supply”  (X)  is  derived 
directly from the main national accounting identity 
that defines gross domestic product (GDP):


GDP = C + I + G + E - M => “Aggregate Supply” (X)
= GDP + M = C + I + G + E


    where C stands for consumption, I private invest-
ment,  G  government  spending,  E  exports  and 
M imports.


    This  expression  can  be  rearranged  by  replacing 
consumption with “disposable income minus sav-
ings”, where disposable income is GDP minus taxes. 
Further, using t to denote the average aggregate tax 


Notes




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


25


rate, s to denote the private saving propensity and m
the import propensity, the expression for aggregate 
supply growth reduces to: 


    Dots  denote  variations  over  time  and hats  denote 
growth rates. See Godley, 1999; and Berg and Taylor, 
2001.


11  The data in the table is generated using the United 
Nations Global  Policy Model, which  is  based  on 
historic  data  sets  from official  statistics  up  to  the 
year 2016, and on an “alignment” tool that uses most 
current information up to the first and second quarter 
of 2018 and projects results to the end of the current 
year as a “model solution”. Hence, the table should 
not be taken as a forecast, but as a conditional model 
projection subject to the most current information.


12  A two-year period  is chosen because such drivers 
are either directly or indirectly influenced by policy, 
the effects of which usually take a couple of years 
to materialize.


13  For example, the United Kingdom is at the top of the 
section where net external demand is the strongest. 
The average growth of aggregate supply during these 
two years is 2.1 per cent, of which the estimated aver-
age contribution of net exports is 2.6 per cent. This 
is followed by a meagre 0.1 per cent contribution of 
private demand and by a negative 0.6 contribution 
of government demand. The relative gap between 
the first and the second growth drivers is the larg-
est for the United Kingdom relative to countries in 
this section. By contrast, Indonesia shows a growth 
of aggregate supply of 5.5 per cent, with a 2.3 per 
cent contribution of external demand, which is only 
slightly above the contribution of the second strong-
est driver, private demand.


14  For further discussion see Valletta, 2018 and Poly-
chroniou, 2018.


15  Economic Policy Institute, “Nominal Wage Tracker”, 
https://www.epi.org/nominal-wage-tracker/, accessed 
23 June 2018.


16  https://www.un.org/development/desa/dpad/publica-
tion /united-nations-global-policy-model/.


17  This is captured in the underlying behaviour of the 
model and is not an explicit assumption.


Akyüz Y  (2018,  forthcoming). External  balance  sheets 
of emerging economies: Low-yielding assets, high-
yielding liabilities. South Centre. Geneva.


Bellmann C and Hepburn J (2017). The decline of com-
modity prices and global agricultural trade negotia-
tions: A game changer? International Development
Policy. Articles  8.1. Available  at:  https://journals.
openedition.org/poldev/2384.


Berg J and Taylor L (2001). External liberalization, eco-
nomic performance and social policy. In: Taylor L, 
ed. External Liberalization, Economic Performance
and Social Policy. Oxford University Press. Oxford: 
11–56.


Eichengreen  B  (2018).  The  economic  consequences 
of Trump’s  trade war. Project Syndicate.  12  July. 
Available  at:  https://www.project-syndicate.org/
commentary/economic-consequences-of-trump-
trade-war-by-barry-eichengreen-2018-07.


Godley W  (1999).  Seven  unsustainable  processes: 
Medium-term prospects and policies for the United 
States  and  the  world.  Special  Report.  Jerome 
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. Avail-
able  at:  http://www.levyinstitute.org/publications/
seven-unsustainable-processes.


Hodges P  and  van Scheltinga D de B  (2018). China’s 
lending bubble history. Financial Times.  22 May. 


Available  at:  https://www.ft.com/content/45bd 
8052-59dc-11e8-bdb7-f6677d2e1ce8.


IMF  (2009). Balance of Payments and International
Investment Position Manual. International Monetary 
Fund. Washington, D.C.


Jezard A  (2018). Where  in Europe  have wages  fallen 
most? World Economic Forum.  3 April. Avail-
able at: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/04/
where-in-europe-have-wages-fallen-most/.


Jones M  (2018).  Foreign  investors  dumped  $12.3  bln 
in  emerging market  assets  in May –  IIF. Reuters. 
5 June. Available at: https://www.reuters.com/article/
emerging-markets-flows/update-1-foreign-inves-
tors-dumped-123-bln-in-emerging-market-assets-
in-may-iif-idUSL5N1T729D.


Koepke R and Goel R (2018). EM capital flows monitor. 
Monetary and Capital Markets Department. Interna-
tional Monetary Fund. 4 June.


Lund S, Woetzel J, Windhagen E, Dobbs R and Goldshtein 
D (2018). Rising corporate debt: Peril or promise? 
McKinsey Global Institute Discussion Paper. Avail-
able  at:.  https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McK-
insey/Business%20Functions/Strategy%20and%20
Corporate%20Finance/Our%20Insights/Rising%20
corporate%20debt%20Peril%20or%20promise/Ris-
ing-corporate-debt-peril-or-promise-web-final.ashx.


References


ˆ ˆ ˆˆ ˆ ˆ( ) ( ) ( )ˆ t t s s m m
G I EG t I s E m
T S M


X γ γ γ γ γ γ     = + − + + − + + −     
. .. .


where: ; ;
t s m


t s m
t s m t s m t s mγ γ γ= = =+ + + + + +




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


26


Otsuka S and Toyama N (2018). Indonesia and Brazil fall 
off easing track as capital bleeds out. Nikkei Asian
Review.  18 May. Available  at:  https://asia.nikkei.
com/Economy/Indonesia-and-Brazil-fall-off-easing-
track-as-capital-bleeds-out.


Polychroniou CJ (2018). Misleading unemployment num-
bers and the Neoliberal Ruse of “labor flexibility”. 
Interview with Robert  Pollin. Truthout.  6  June. 
Available at: https://truthout.org/articles/misleading-
unemployment-numbers-and-the-neoliberal-ruse-of-
labor-flexibility/.


Standard & Poor Global (2018). Global Corporate Lever-
age Trends. February. Standard & Poor. New York, 
NY.


UNCTAD  (2018,  forthcoming). Review of Maritime
Transport 2018 (United Nations publication. New 
York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2016). Trade and Development Report,
2016: Structural Transformation for Inclusive and
Sustained Growth (United Nations publication. Sales 
No. E.16.II.D.5. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2017). Trade and Development Report,
2017: Beyond Austerity: Towards a Global New Deal
(United Nations publication. Sales No. E.17.II.D.5. 
New York and Geneva).


United Nations (2018a, forthcoming). Secretary General
Report on External Debt Sustainability and Develop-
ment to the 73nd Session of the UN General Assembly. 
United Nations, New York.


United Nations (2018b). Report of the Inter-agency Task
Force on Financing for Development 2018 (Sales
No. E.18.I.5. New York).


Valletta RG  (2018).  Involuntary  part-time work: Yes, 
it’s  here  to  stay.  SF Fed Blog.  11 April.  Federal 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Available at: https://
www.frbsf.org/our-district/about/sf-fed-blog/
involuntary-part-time-work-here-to-stay/.


van Dijkhuizen A and Neuteboom N (2018). Emerging Mar-
kets Watch – EM capital flows: Singling out the weakest 
links. ABN Amro Insights. Available at: https://insights.
abnamro.nl/en/2018/05/emerging-markets-watch-em-
capital-flows-singling-out-the-weakest-links/.




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


27


This appendix presents model projections of an esca-
lation of trade tensions between the United States, 
and Canada, China, Japan, Mexico, the Republic of 
Korea and the European Union.


The direct impact of actual tariff increases on the
economies involved appears negligible – for example, 
recent United States tariffs hit $34 billion of imports 
from China, or less 0.02 per cent of the GDP of the 
United States. However,  the  indirect consequences 
of a “trade war” have raised more serious concerns, 
with most assessments focusing on supply-side effects 
such as the possible disruption of global supply chains 
and the risk that technology flows across countries 
may become restricted. By contrast, there has been 
comparatively  little  recognition  of  the macro-
economic mechanisms that may play out in a trade
war, especially in terms of distributional and financial 
imbalances and their impact on aggregate demand. 
The projections presented here address this gap.


Seen through the lens of these projections the most 
serious effect of a trade war may be to trigger a fall in 
aggregate demand, regardless of the extent to which 
trade  volumes  initially  suffer.  Consequently,  the 
projections remain relevant even if the current trade 
tensions are eventually defused. In fact, the impact 
of trade policy cannot be seen in isolation from the
distributional conflicts, inadequate aggregate demand 
and rising financial vulnerabilities that have become 
centrepieces of today’s global economy.


The  projections  are  calculated with  the United 
Nations Global Policy Model (GPM),16 a dynamic
macroeconomic model based on a globally consistent 
database of macrofinancial variables. A distinguishing 
feature of the GPM is its demand-driven character, 
implying that it does not assume full employment or 
constant income distribution (as is often the case in
other global models). While the GPM is not a trade 
model (therefore it contains no details on tariffs and
limited details on trade of specific merchandises) it 
provides an aggregate picture in which trade is linked 
to macroeconomic  features,  including  growth  and 
income distribution.


Two scenarios are presented here: a baseline scenario, 
which charts out the path the global economy would 
take without a trade war or any exogenous shocks, 
and the trade war scenario.


Country grouping


For  the  purpose  of  these  projections  the  global 
economy is divided into 30 countries/groups, includ-
ing  19  individual  countries  (Argentina, Australia, 
Brazil,  Canada, China,  France, Germany,  India, 
Indonesia,  Italy,  Japan, Mexico,  the Republic  of 
Korea, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South 
Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United 
States) and 11 aggregated groups (Other European 
Union, Other Europe, Other Developed Countries, 
Other Transition Economies, Other East Asia, Other 
West Asia, Other  South Asia  and  Pacific, Other 
South America, Caribbean, North Africa and Other 
Africa).


For ease of presentation only, the 30 blocs are rear-
ranged into six blocs. Three of these are participants 
in the trade war: China, the United States and Other 
Warring Countries  (Canada,  Japan, Mexico,  the 
Republic  of Korea  and  the European Union). The 
other three blocs contain the “non-belligerent” coun-
tries: Other Developed Countries, Other Developing 
Countries  and  a  bloc  of Vulnerable  (developing) 
Countries (Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia, South Africa 
and Turkey) characterized by volatile growth rates, 
persistent  current-account  imbalances,  large  accu-
mulation  of  net  external  liabilities  and  significant 
exchange rate fluctuations.


The challenges of the Vulnerable Countries are, to a 
lesser extent, shared by many other economies, both 
developed and developing. Hence, as noted further 
below,  depending  on  the  gravity  of  such  vulner-
abilities several of these economies may be subject 
to major macrofinancial adjustments in the event the 
trade war escalates.


Baseline scenario


Projected outcomes of the trade war are assessed in 
comparison with  projected  outcomes  in  the  base-
line scenario, a  scenario with no  trade war or any 
exogenous  shocks. But while  a  no-shock  baseline 
scenario is the standard term of comparison in model
projections, it is not necessarily the most likely future 
scenario. In fact, as this chapter has argued, the global 
economy exhibits unsustainable trends (in policies, 
indebtedness,  asset prices etc.)  that  cannot deliver 


Appendix I.A: A “trade war” scenario




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


28


reasonable growth  for  the next five years. Several 
crisis scenarios may be more likely but are less useful 
as terms of comparison for another crisis scenario, 
such as a trade war. In this sense, a no-shock baseline 
scenario  is  inevitably  ambiguous  but  provides  an 
informative comparison.


In the baseline projections, all countries are assumed 
to  keep  their  current  policy  stances  unchanged 
through  2023. Based  on  information  available  in 
2018, fiscal policy is expected to reflect the discus-
sion in section D of this chapter, with a trend towards 
moderate relaxation of the fiscal deficit in the United 
States (following the tax reform that has taken effect 
in 2018) and towards moderate tightening in China, 
Other Warring Countries and Vulnerable Countries. 
The group of Other Developed Countries is projected 
to keep its fiscal stance unchanged at the current level. 
It has been clearly stated in the corpus of the chapter
that such a configuration of policies is neither condu-
cive to a sustained and inclusive pattern of growth, 
nor sustainable to the extent that imbalances would
tend to implode in the form of financial crises. The 
experience of the years before the Great Recession 
are painful testimony of such concern. However, it 
can also be observed by looking at the data from this 
period that it is difficult, if not impossible, to forecast 
the timing and concrete manifestations of such a kind 
of crisis, just as it is also impossible to predict the 
nature of the policy responses. 


The external imbalance of the United States is
expected  to worsen,  given  the  larger fiscal  deficit 
and moderate “releveraging” by  the private  sector 
(responding  to  asset  appreciations  and  financial 
deregulation). Under  such  conditional  projections 
the deficit of the current account of the United States 
will rise from about 3.4 per cent of GDP in mid-2018 
to about 4.5 per cent in 2023. China is assumed to 
continue its shift towards greater reliance on domestic 
demand, with the external balance stabilizing around 
a surplus of about 2 per cent of GDP, close to  the 
average  for  the  period  after  the Great Recession. 
The group of Other Warring Countries has recorded 
rising  external  surpluses  in  the  recent  past, which 
are likely to continue over this period. The group of 
Other Developed Countries  is projected  to experi-
ence a moderate rise of their export surplus, along 
with moderately  expansionary  domestic  demand. 
Other Developing Countries as a group will experi-
ence robust growth (though at a more moderate pace 
than in the past) and a balanced external sector. By 
contrast, the set of Vulnerable Developing Countries 


are projected to remain in deficit and further increase 
their external debt.


Real exchange rate changes during 2018 are estimat-
ed to continue along the trajectory of 2017, implying 
nominal appreciations of the euro, the United States 
dollar and the British pound and, conversely, some 
degree of nominal depreciation in many other coun-
tries,  including China,  Japan  and Mexico which 
are singled out as being  involved  in  the simulated 
trade war. Throughout  the years 2019  to 2023  the 
inherited trends are maintained at a more moderate
pace, both for nominal and real exchange rates. By 
contrast, many economies in the developing world 
have experienced sharper depreciations in the years
2016 and 2017 and, more recently, in 2018. Hence a 
relatively protracted period of weaker currencies is 
projected for these groups, even though the tendency 
to devaluation will reduce over time.


The  labour  income  share  of GDP  has  been  on  a 
declining path  for  nearly  two decades  or more  in 
almost all developed countries and in numerous
developing countries. This trend has meant a mas-
sive transfer of income from wage earners to profit 
earners since the early 1990s (4 per cent of GDP in 
the United States, 5 per cent in Germany, 10 per cent 
in France, 12 per cent in Italy). In China, the sharply 
falling trend that characterized the period of inser-
tion in global trade was reversed from 2007 to 2015. 
It has since stabilized after  recovering almost half 
of the previous years’ losses. The picture has been 
more varied for the other sets of countries assumed
here  to  be  directly  involved  in  the  trade  conflict. 
Despite such varying trends, for the purpose of this 
exercise labour shares are assumed to remain rela-
tively stable in China and in the United States while
they are assumed to decrease only slightly in Other 
Developed Countries, Other Developing Countries 
and Vulnerable Countries.


As also stressed graphically for the groups involved 
in the trade war (see figure 1A.1), the trends in labour 
income shares have been closely related to the growth 
of consumption in real terms (with the usual caveat, 
discussed in this and other TDRs,  that  economies 
with considerably deregulated financial markets can 
maintain rapid increases in debt-driven consumer
spending, usually supported by asset appreciations). 
Such a correlation, which denotes the known causal-
ity from income, spending/saving behaviour of wage 
earners and consumption, plays a meaningful role in 
the outcome of the trade war scenario described below.




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


29


Expansionary monetary policy (in the form of both
low interest rates and quantitative easing) is expected 
to continue in all developed countries, although at a 
more moderate pace, as renewed financial instabil-
ity  –  possibly  triggered  by  international  disputes 
over  trade  and  exchange  rates  –  threatens  global 
growth.


In the baseline scenario global GDP growth is pro-
jected to slow down to 2.9 per cent in 2018 and hover 
around this rate through to 2023.


Trade war scenario


The trade war scenario is based on the view that
the major consequences of a tariff escalation would 
come  from macroeconomic  adjustments  rather 
than  a  change  in  trade volumes. To  explore  these 
consequences,  governments  are  assumed  to  fully 
compensate their exporters for any tariffs paid to
foreign governments, so that tariffs will not have any 
immediate impact on trade volumes. Trade volumes 
are projected to change eventually because of changes 
in national incomes (which affect import demands) 
rather than tariffs.


While  short-term  exchange  rate  fluctuations  are 
generally  reflected  in  changes  in  profit markups, 
in  a  trade war  policymakers  are more  likely  to 
be  proactive. On  the  one  hand,  governments  are 
typically sensitive to the requests of exporters. On 
the other hand, multilateral discussions on policy 


coordination  have  emphasized  growth  strategies 
that  are  still  based  on  increasing most  countries’ 
export  shares,  notwithstanding  the  inconsistency 
of  that position. Assuming  that all participants  in 
the trade war will try to preserve their export shares
reflects this reality.


From  the  perspective  of  an  importing  economy  it 
should be clear that the network of production and 
specialization cannot be  rebuilt  domestically  from 
one day to the next. An existing domestic structure 
of production, as well as consumption patterns that 
depend heavily on acquired technologies and prefer-
ences, do not change drastically. From the perspective 
of producers in the exporting country, the implication 
of shutting down the entire market of the importing 
country  because  of  the  “cost  of  the  tariff” would 
certainly have more severe implications in terms of
employment  and  social  stability  in  the originating 
country than the “price cost” for the exporter itself. 
In other words, the domestic implication of the tariff 
faced abroad becomes a far greater social and eco-
nomic  concern  for  the  policymaker  than what  the 
tariff  actually  represents.  In  sum,  this  assumption 
simply reflects the known historical experience that 
when  the  corporate  sector  faces financial  difficul-
ties,  the government usually  steps  in with  support 
mechanisms.


At the same time, producers, and especially the large 
companies  that  have been  increasing  their market 
shares  over  the  past  two decades,  are  assumed  to 
continue to exercise their leverage in labour markets 


FIGURE 1A.1 Labour income share and consumption in countries involved in the trade war, 2003–2023
(Labour income as a percentage of GDP; consumption in annual growth rates)


Source: United Nations Global Policy Model and World Database.


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11


12


48


50


52


54


56


58


2003 2008 2013 2018 2023


China


-2


-1


0


1


2


3


53


54


55


56


57


2003 2008 2013 2018 2023


Other "warring" countries


-2


-1


0


1


2


3


4


52


53


54


55


56


2003 2008 2013 2018 2023


United States


Labour income (baseline)
Labour income (trade war)


Consumption growth (baseline, right scale)
Consumption growth (trade war, right scale)




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


30


to lower wage costs in response to a more challenging
trading environment.


In a nutshell, the scenario presents a situation where
increased tariffs will lead to the government of each
belligerent party reimbursing its exporters, so as to
retain global export shares and avert employment
collapses, while in the receiving economy domestic
prices will remain, in principle, at previous levels.
This effectively implies transfers (even if these
are small compared with the sizes of these econo­
mies) from surplus economies to the United States.
Additionally, some countries will allow their real
exchange rates to depreciate marginally to maintain
global market shares.


In the trade war scenario, the tariff escalation trig­
gers downward pressures on wages and generates
uncertainty around the path of economic policy. This
damages aggregate demand, economic growth and,
ultimately, trade activity and financial stability. More
specifically, the scenario is defined by the following
four assumptions:


1. Tariffs


The United States is assumed to impose a 20 per
cent tariff on all its imports from China and two
thirds of its imports from Canada, Japan, Mexico,
the Republic of Korea and the European Union.
It is assumed that China and these other countries
retaliate with equivalent tariffs, dollar for dollar.
No country is assumed to impose higher tariffs
than those it was targeted by or impose them on
a larger trade volume.


2. Tariff revenues


Warring governments fully compensate their
exporters for the tariffs paid to foreign govern­
ments, using the revenue obtained by taxing
imports and, where this is not sufficient, general
tax revenue. If this combination of tariffs and
transfers produces a net revenue, this is used to
reduce the government’s deficit and debt. For
example, in 2019 the United States Government
is projected to gain approximately $280 billion
in tariffs and to transfer to United States export­
ing businesses $181 billion for the tariffs paid
to Canada, China, Japan, Mexico, the Republic
of Korea and the European Union – a version
of the border adjustment tax. The United States
Government is projected to gain a net $99 billion
in revenue that it then uses to reduce its deficit
and debt.


Under this assumption, a redistribution of resour­
ces is projected to take place: businesses will
transfer resources to foreign governments (in
the form of tariffs) and these will transfer them
to their exporting businesses (in the form of
reimbursements). Globally, the result of these
flows is a transfer of resources between govern­
ments, with some obtaining a net revenue and
others a net loss. The largest transfer will be
from China to the United States, and it will be
in the order of 0.5 per cent of the GDP of China.
The other countries estimated to experience net
losses are Japan, Mexico and the Republic of
Korea, to degrees significantly lower than those
of China, both absolutely and relative to GDP (see
figure 1A.2, which shows the net international
transfer in nominal terms).


3. Currency devaluation
Countries that suffer a net fiscal loss resort


to exchange rate devaluation in an attempt to
increase their export shares and gain additional
export revenue. In recent years, exchange rate
targeting has been achieved through a variety
of actions, including “managed floating”, quan­
titative easing and other forms of policy­driven
liquidity expansion.


For the purpose of this simulation, China, Japan,
Mexico and the Republic of Korea, which are
the countries that eventually make a net tariff
payment to the United States, are assumed to let
their currencies depreciate approximately 2 per
cent below the baseline. As noted above, the
depreciation trend is partly embedded in the fact
that the main reserve currencies are projected to
strengthen in the coming years in the wake of the
normalization of monetary policy.


4. Labour shares
Labour shares of national income are assumed


to fall as the trade war is used in the public
discourse to justify calls for (more) wage mod­
eration. Projected decreases are approximately
half of those observed during the recessions and
economic slowdowns of the last two decades. The
decline will deepen real exchange depreciations,
which depend not only on the nominal rate but
also on domestic inflation, of which unit labour
costs are the main factor.


The direct result of the redistribution of income
towards profits will be a weakening of domestic
demand, as workers’ relatively reduced purchasing




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


31


power  causes  consumption  to  decelerate. This  is 
observed  in  all warring  countries, with  the  larg-
est  impacts projected  in China and Other Warring 
Countries,  especially  Germany,  Japan  and  the 
Republic of Korea (see figure 1A.1 and table 1A.1). 
The  dynamics  of  wage-share  compression  and 
weaker aggregate demand will have a spillover effect 
on other countries as well, observed in the form of 
slight falls in their wage shares (this being entirely 
an outcome, not an assumption).


The impacts of the distributional shifts will eventu-
ally be  felt by  investors, despite  the  implied rising 
profit  shares. The model  estimates  that dampening 
effects on investment may be significant in all warring 
countries. In China, the United States, the European 
Union and Other East Asia, the growth rate of private 
investment is projected to decrease by approximately 
1 percentage point per year through 2023, leading to 
cumulative drops of about 6 per cent or more (see table 
1A.1). Other countries will also experience declines of 
investment, because of the global impact on aggregate 
demand emanating from the countries in litigation, 
as well as on confidence. The impact of the decelera-
tion of investment trends on economic growth is in 
this case considerably more noticeable than in other
circumstances. In this case, investment in practically 
all  economies highlighted has been experiencing a 
relatively declining  trend  in  the  last  years  (among 
those, the case of China reflects an intended domestic 
restructuring effort). Moreover, as has also happened 
in earlier periods of economic deceleration triggered 


initially  by  consumer  demand,  the  deceleration or 
decline in consumption and investment demand affect
growth in obvious ways (see figure 1A.3).


The combined effects of monetary policy normali-
zation  in  reserve currency economies, with partial 
devaluations in affected economies paying net tariffs, 
and the overall effects of slowdown of unit labour
costs (in the wake of wage-share compressions) will 
lead to a slight decline of real exchange rates in China 
(see table 1A.1) as well as in Japan, Mexico and the 
Republic of Korea.


A trade war is projected to damage growth, income 
distribution and employment, in all countries, though 
this will be more marked in the countries assumed to 
be involved in the tariff skirmishes. Admittedly, the 
United States will experience a decline in the current-
account deficit, while China and, to a lesser degree, 
other warring countries will experience the opposite 
effect  of  reduced  surpluses. For  the United States 
and China, this will be almost entirely the result of 
the tariff transfer and not because of a change in the 
configuration of global production and demand (see 
figure 1A.2). Taking away such tariff changes,  the 
deficit in the United States could be comparable to 
the baseline, since there will be both a deceleration 
in imports due to the changes in domestic consump-
tion  and  investment,  as well  as  a  deceleration  of 
United States exports in response to the changes in 
global demand.  Indeed,  the shocks  to distribution, 
consumption and  investment at a global  level will 


FIGURE 1A.2 External income and transfers, and the current account in countries involved
in the trade war, 2015–2023
(External income and transfers in billions of dollars; current account as a percentage of GDP)


Source: See figure 1A.1.


-100


-50


0


50


100


150


1.0


1.5


2.0


2.5


3.0


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


China


0


20


40


60


80


100


120


140


160


1.5


1.6


1.7


1.8


1.9


2.0


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


Other "warring" countries


-40
-20


0
20
40
60
80


100
120
140
160
180


-5.0
-4.5
-4.0
-3.5
-3.0
-2.5
-2.0
-1.5
-1.0
-0.5
0.0


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


United States


Current account (baseline)
Current account (trade war)


External income and transfers (baseline, right scale )
External income and transfers (trade war, right scale)




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


32


TA
B


LE
1


A
.1


O
ut


co
m


es
fo


r c
ou


nt
rie


s /
o


th
er


g
ro


up
s


(C
on


st
an


t d
ol


la
r p


ric
es


, a
nn


ua
l p


er
ce


nt
ag


e
ch


an
ge


s)


U
ni


te
d


S
ta


te
s


C
hi


na
O


th
er


“w
ar


rin
g”


c
ou


nt
rie


s
Vu


ln
er


ab
le


d
ev


el
op


in
g


ec
on


om
ie


s
O


th
er


d
ev


el
op


ed


ec
on


om
ie


s
O


th
er


d
ev


el
op


in
g


ec
on


om
ie


s


20
18


20
23


C
um


.
ch


an
ge



ov


er


5
ye


ar
s


20
18


20
23


C
um


.
ch


an
ge



ov


er


5
ye


ar
s


20
18


20
23


C
um


.
ch


an
ge



ov


er


5
ye


ar
s


20
18


20
23


C
um


.
ch


an
ge



ov


er


5
ye


ar
s


20
18


20
23


C
um


.
ch


an
ge



ov


er


5
ye


ar
s


20
18


20
23


C
um


.
ch


an
ge



ov


er


5
ye


ar
s


G
D


P
g


ro
w


th


(
pe


rc
en


ta
ge


)
B


as
el


in
e


2.
7


2.
2


6.
7


5.
8


1.
8


1.
8


2.
8


3.
2


2.
5


2.
3


3.
7


4.
1


Tr
ad


e
w


ar
s


ce
na


rio
1.


8
-2


.5
5.


3
-3


.9
1.


3
-2


.9
2.


9
-1


.5
2.


0
-1


.6
3.


7
-2


.2
P


riv
at


e
in


ve
st


m
en


t
(


pe
rc


en
ta


ge
)


B
as


el
in


e
6.


1
2.


7
3.


8
3.


9
2.


7
1.


9
2.


9
2.


2
3.


4
2.


9
4.


8
4.


1
Tr


ad
e


w
ar


s
ce


na
rio


1.
9


-5
.8


2.
9


-6
.3


0.
9


-5
.9


1.
7


-2
.1


2.
4


-2
.2


3.
5


-2
.9


C
on


su
m


pt
io


n
gr


ow
th


(
pe


rc
en


ta
ge


)
B


as
el


in
e


2.
1


2.
2


7.
9


7.
1


1.
1


1.
8


4.
5


3.
5


2.
4


2.
4


5.
6


4.
4


Tr
ad


e
w


ar
s


ce
na


rio
1.


9
-1


.9
6.


5
-6


.2
1.


3
-2


.8
3.


3
-1


.0
2.


3
-0


.9
4.


3
-1


.3
La


bo
ur


in
co


m
e


sh
ar


e
(


pe
rc


en
ta


ge
o


f G
D


P
)


B
as


el
in


e
53


.1
53


.1
54


.2
54


.1
54


.6
54


.7
50


.6
50


.6
56


.3
55


.8
48


.2
48


.2
Tr


ad
e


w
ar


s
ce


na
rio


54
.1


-2
.5


54
.7


-4
.2


55
.8


-4
.1


48
.2


-0
.3


50
.6


-0
.1


0.
0


-1
.6


R
ea


l e
xc


ha
ng


e
ra


te
(


in
de


x:
w


or
ld


=
1


)
B


as
el


in
e


1.
34


1
1.


35
0


0.
83


1
0.


85
4


1.
19


7
1.


25
6


0.
84


2
0.


77
9


1.
50


7
1.


47
6


0.
66


1
0.


65
7


Tr
ad


e
w


ar
s


ce
na


rio
1.


37
2


-
0.


82
1


-
1.


25
7


-
0.


79
0


-
1.


49
6


-
0.


66
5


-
C


ur
re


nt
a


cc
ou


nt
b


al
an


ce


(
pe


rc
en


ta
ge


o
f G


D
P


)
B


as
el


in
e


-3
.3


-4
.5


1.
1


1.
9


1.
9


1.
8


-3
.1


-2
.0


1.
6


2.
9


0.
6


0.
5


Tr
ad


e
w


ar
s


ce
na


rio
-3


.9
4.


5
2.


1
-0


.9
1.


9
0.


2
-2


.4
-0


.5
2.


3
-0


.5
-0


.2
-2


.9
B


al
an


ce
o


f i
nc


om
e


a
nd


tr
an


sf
er


s
(


bi
lli


on
s


of
c


ur
re


nt
d


ol
la


rs
)


B
as


el
in


e
83


.6
-1


6.
3


51
.6


15
8.


2
65


.6
14


5.
2


-9
1.


7
-1


45
.9


-0
.2


-7
.3


-1
08


.9
-1


33
.8


Tr
ad


e
w


ar
s


ce
na


rio
13


7.
2


64
1.


3
34


.5
-5


18
.9


11
2.


2
-1


31
.8


-1
44


.6
2.


5
-8


.0
-1


.6
-1


31
.4


8.
6


E
xp


or
t v


ol
um


e
gr


ow
th


(
pe


rc
en


ta
ge


)
B


as
el


in
e


3.
7


2.
3


7.
1


7.
9


5.
0


2.
9


3.
9


4.
8


3.
2


3.
2


1.
3


4.
4


Tr
ad


e
w


ar
s


ce
na


rio
1.


5
-4


.8
7.


8
-2


.4
2.


2
-4


.9
4.


2
-4


.1
2.


6
-4


.3
3.


8
-4


.7


S
ou


rc
e:



S


ee
fi


gu
re


1
A


.1
.




CURRENT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY


33


result in sizeable slowdowns in global demand, and 
hence export and import growth (see figure 1A.4 and 
table  1A.2). On  account  of  the  export  slowdown, 
China and Other Developing Countries will suffer 
real losses in their current account. China, however, 
will manage to regain most of its external net posi-
tion after four years, resulting from the real exchange 
rate adjustment and presumably from the persistent 
structure of  trade  linkages with other  partners  not 
directly involved in the trade dispute. The historical 
data on bilateral manufacture exports and imports
suggest that when China experiences a slowdown of 
its exports to a particular set of countries outside its
region, it can resort to cutting regional imports in a 
commensurate way.17


In the current context of increasing financial fragil-
ity  in  several developing countries,  a hypothetical 
trade war of the kind simulated in this exercise may 
lead to even more serious consequences for such


countries. The main channels involve currency depre-
ciations, unruly capital movements and deflationary 
policy responses. For example, the higher projected 
exchange rate volatility could affect investors’ con-
fidence  and  trigger  capital  flights  as  lenders  and 
portfolio managers, following a well-rehearsed script, 
seek safer assets and higher margins of safety. This 
could exacerbate and activate a spiralling sequence 
of falling investment, spiking unemployment, falling 
consumption,  inflating  sovereign debts  (especially 
the liabilities denominated in foreign currencies) and 
falling government revenue and spending.


It should be clear, though it is not empirically project-
ed in this model simulation, that several developing 
countries  experiencing  increasing  financial  and 
distributional  imbalances can be shaken by events 
of even minor significance for the global economy. 
In particular, for approximately a decade, the set of 
“vulnerable” countries  singled out  in  this  exercise 


FIGURE 1A.3 Growth of GDP and investment, 2015–2023
(Annual percentages)


Source: See figure 1A.1.


2.0


2.5


3.0


3.5


4.0


4.5


5.0


5.5


6.0


4.0


4.5


5.0


5.5


6.0


6.5


7.0


7.5


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


China


0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.5
6.0


1.0


1.2


1.4


1.6


1.8


2.0


2.2


2.4


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


Other "warring" countries


-4
-3
-2
-1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7


1.0


1.5


2.0


2.5


3.0


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


United States


-4.5


-2.5


-0.5


1.5


3.5


5.5


2.5


2.7


2.9


3.1


3.3


3.5


3.7


3.9


4.1


4.3


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


Other developing economies


-2


-1


0


1


2


3


4


1.9


2.0


2.1


2.2


2.3


2.4


2.5


2.6


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


Other developed economies


-4.5
-3.5
-2.5
-1.5
-0.5
0.5
1.5
2.5
3.5
4.5
5.5
6.5


0.0


0.5


1.0


1.5


2.0


2.5


3.0


3.5


4.0


2015 2017 2019 2021 2023


Vulnerable developing economies


GDP (baseline)GDP (trade war) Investment (baseline, right scale)Investment (trade war, right scale)




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


34


have all experienced deceleration or high fluctuations 
of GDP growth  and persistently negative  current-
account balances. Over  time,  these countries have 


accumulated negative balances on external assets and 
liabilities. They have also all experienced depreciat-
ing  real  exchange  rates  that  have not  helped  their 
external balances recover (either because a “trade
recovery” did not materialize because of structural 
constraints, or because the external debt payments 
have been larger than the trade revenues).


As  noted  above,  however,  such  vulnerabilities 
should not be considered unique to countries in this
group. Many developing and developed countries 
may experience unwelcome shocks in the event of 
severe disruptions of direct investment and financial 
flows. For all countries, any further weakening of 
aggregate demand in developed countries, triggered 
by  a  tariff  struggle  or  any  other  spark  in  global 
markets,  combined with more wage compression, 
fiscal  austerity  and  related  factors  that  discour-
age  productive  investment  and  employment, may 
lead to another global crisis or, at the very least, to 
sharply deteriorating conditions in the international 
macrofinancial environment, with governments and 
central banks having far less room to intervene than 
in earlier crises.


Chapter II of this Report shows that the patterns
of  trade flows have been  changing  since  the mid-
1990s. Figure 1A.4 highlights this by showing the 
trends of growth of global GDP and export volume, 
stressing the dissociation that starts after the Great 
Recession. It is apparent that the changes estimated 
to  affect  global  trade  in  this  simulation,  resulting 
not from tariffs per se but from more fundamental
macroeconomic effects, are not significant compared 
with changes  in other  recent periods, when global 
aggregate demand has fluctuated more severely than 
is projected in this scenario.


As is discussed in this Report, there is no doubt that 
global trade, even before the slowdown after the cri-
sis, has fallen short of its promise to promote higher 
value added activities more evenly across the world
economy. Still,  after  decades  of  experiencing  the 
limits of “free trade”, it would be tragic to embrace 
the opposite excess – a trade-tariff war – rather than to 
consider what governments could do, through global 
policy coordination, to avert the continuing deteriora-
tion of income distribution and employment that are
at the root of most recent economic crises.


TABLE 1A.2 World variables
(Constant dollar prices; annual percentage
changes)


2018 2023


Cumulative
change over


5 years


World gross product (WGP) growth
Baseline 2.9 2.9
Trade war scenario 2.4 -2.7


Private investment growth
Baseline 4.0 3.2
Trade war scenario 2.3 -5.0


Consumption growth
Baseline 3.7 3.6
Trade war scenario 3.2 -2.5


Trade volume growth
Baseline 4.1 3.8
Trade war scenario 3.2 -4.6


Labour income share of WGP
Baseline 52.3 52.3
Trade war scenario 51.6 -2.2


Source: See figure 1A.1.
Note: WGP is calculated weighing country blocs based on 2005 GDP.


FIGURE 1A.4 World gross product and trade
volume growth rates, 1990–2023
(Annual percentages)


Source: See figure 1A.1.


-10


-5


0


5


10


15


-3


-2


-1


0


1


2


3


4


5


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020


World gross product (basel ine)
World gross product (trade war)


Trade volume (baseline, right scale)
Trade volume (trade war, right scale)


2023




35


THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE
UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION II


The backlash against hyperglobalization is gaining 
momentum with  the  international  trading  system 
on the front line. This is a surprising turn of events. 
As discussed  in previous Reports,  the  roots of  the 
heightened  insecurity,  indebtedness  and  inequality 
that are hallmarks of the current era stem more from 
the workings of the financial system than the trade 
regime; and that regime proved robust in the face of 
the economic fallout from the global financial crisis. 
Moreover, using tariffs to mitigate the problems of 
hyperglobalization will  not  only  fail  to  do  so  but 
runs the danger of adding to them, through a vicious 
circle  of  retaliatory  actions,  heightened  economic 
uncertainty and slower growth.


Still, it would be foolish to dismiss the constituency 
in advanced economies worried about trade shocks 
as  simply  ignorant  of  the  subtleties  of Ricardian 
theory or misguided victims of populist politicians. 
Indeed, in addition to discontent in the North, there 
are numerous and long-standing concerns that devel-
oping countries have been raising about the workings 
of the international trading system which have also 
intensified in this century.


In reality,  the  lived experiences of each and every 
constituency at the local level reflects the intertwining 
of trade, financial and technological forces operating 
through national,  regional  and global markets  and 
managed  by  policies,  regulations  and  institutions 
designed to govern those markets and interactions.


The dominant narrative of the current era equates
globalization with the growing reach (and porosity) 
of markets and an accelerating pace of technological 
change. It employs the language of “free trade” to 
promote the idea of a harmonious (win-win) world 


governed through clear rules and greater competition. 
But hyperglobalization has as much to do with profits 
and mobile capital as with prices and mobile phones
and it is governed by large firms that have established 
increasingly  dominant market  positions.  Indeed, 
while trade and technology, through both destructive 
as well as creative impulses, have, no doubt, had an 
impact on the way we go about organizing our lives, 
in the end it is social and political initiatives in the
form of rules, norms and policies that matter most 
for the outcomes of an interdependent world. And, as 
described in previous Reports, the hyperglobalized 
world is one where money and power have become
inseparable  and where  capital  – whether  tangible 
or intangible, long term or short term, industrial or 
financial – has extricated itself from regulatory over-
sight and restraint and muted the voice and influence 
of other social stakeholders with an interest  in  the 
direction of public policy.


As a  result,  it  is hardly  surprising  that heightened 
anxiety among a growing number of  casualties of 
hyperglobalization has led to much more question-
ing  of  the  official  story  of  the  shared  benefits  of 
trade. Trade sceptics now have substantial political 
constituencies across the world, in both developed 
and developing countries.


Mainstream economists bear part of the responsibil-
ity for the current state of affairs. Ignoring their own 
analytical nuances and the subtleties of economic
history, they remain biased in favour of unqualified 
free trade when it comes to communicating with poli-
cymakers and broader audiences (see e.g. Driskill, 
2012; Rodrik, 2017, 2018).1 The mainstream narra-
tive pitches “comparative advantage” as a “win-win” 
boost  to  economic  efficiency  and  social welfare, 


A. Introduction




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


36


without specifying the conditions under which such 
beneficial outcomes can occur or how any negative 
effects could be abrogated.


There  is  no  doubt  that  the  new protectionist  tide, 
together with  the  declining  spirit  of  international 
cooperation, poses significant challenges for govern-
ments around the world. However, the call to double 
down on “free trade” provides a cover for a regime 
of footloose capital, concentrated market power and 
the capture of public policy by powerful economic
interests. Fighting isolationism effectively requires 
recognizing that many of the rules adopted to promote 
“free trade” have not promoted a rules-based system 
that is inclusive, transparent and development friend-
ly. Reviving optimism about trade and multilateralism 
must go beyond simply promoting trade for trade’s 
sake and pitching multilateralism as the last line of 
defence against an autarchic Hobbesian dystopia. A 
more positive narrative and agenda is required.


The  2030 Agenda  for  Sustainable Development 
offers such an agenda but it lacks a clear accompa-
nying narrative, simply stating that “[i]nternational 
trade is an engine for  inclusive economic growth” 
(United Nations, 2015). This is unfortunate, because 
the case for international trade and its implications
for growth, employment and distributive justice and 
social norms is a subtle one that depends heavily on
context (Rodrik, 2011).


In  the  context  of  hyperglobalization,  this  chapter 
addresses  the  following questions: To what  extent 
has trade promoted structural change? Which coun-
tries and/or social groups have benefited from deeper 


trade  integration? Under what  conditions can  trade 
have positive developmental and distributive effects?
It  provides  new  evidence  that  the  governance  of 
international  trade  in  the  era of hyperglobalization 
has  contributed  to  increasing domestic  inequalities 
in many countries. This has in part reflected the way 
in which  trade  is  governed  in  global  value  chains 
(GVCs), which has heightened the bargaining power of 
footloose capital, including through job offshoring to 
poorer countries (or simply the threat of that), as well 
as market concentrating and rent-seeking practices of 
large firms that effectively weaken competition. This 
is partly because  international  trade  is  increasingly 
governed by “free  trade” agreements  that empower 
global  firms.  For  example,  services  derived  from 
intangible assets whose geographical location can be 
determined by firms almost at will – such as financial 
assets or intellectual property rights (IPR) – can now 
be “traded” more freely between higher-tax and lower-
tax jurisdictions and within transnational corporations 
(TNCs)  themselves. Overall,  these  processes  have 
tilted the distribution of value added in favour of
capital, especially transnational capital, whose owners 
remain mostly headquartered in developed countries.


The  chapter  is  structured  as  follows.2  Section B 
reviews some stylized facts on the shifting dynamics 
of world trade since the Second World War, highlight-
ing some key patterns that have shaped this changing 
landscape. Section C assesses to what extent trade has 
promoted structural change in developing countries. 
Section D examines the effects of trade on inequality. 
Section E discusses the macroeconomic relevance of
the trade and development challenges and lays out 
some policy recommendations.


B. Trade dynamics after the Second World War


Between the end of the Second World War and the 
global financial crisis  (GFC),  the growth of world 
trade  consistently  outpaced  that  of  global  output 
albeit with significant differences in the gap across 
subperiods (figure 2.1). The gap has persisted since 
2008, just as both trade and output growth have been 
low by historical standards. However, there are other 
significant changes in trade dynamics over the last 70 
years, particularly with respect to developing country 
participation, that it is important to flag.


1. The rise and fall of the Golden Age:
1950–1986


Between  1950  and  1973, world  trade  grew  at  an 
average annual rate of nearly 8 per cent, amid strong 
declines  of  trade  costs  of  all  kinds  resulting  from 
peace dividends, improvements in transport, a fast 
pace of investment and rapid productivity growth, a 
measured drop in tariffs, and a stable international 
monetary system. Rapid recovery in Western Europe, 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


37


solid growth in the United States and stellar growth 
in  Japan,  along with  continuing  industrialization 
in the Soviet Union and the emergence of first-tier 
newly industrializing economies (NIEs) towards the 
end of this period also contributed to this process. 
Developed countries accounted for two thirds of the 
growth of world trade during this period with the big 
change being the steady decline of the United States 
as  a  trading  hegemon  and  its  replacement  by  the 
Federal Republic of Germany and Japan (figure 2.2).


Most of the increase in trade flows reflected rising 
intra-  and  inter-industry  trade  among  developed 
countries and with a strong regional dimension. Trade 
rules, consequently, were designed by a small club 
of relatively wealthy converging economies, to con-
solidate broad economic gains coming from outside 
the trading system (Rose, 2004), and with a degree of 


tolerance of the trade practices of (mainly develop-
ing) countries who were not part of the club but with 
little concern to address their particular challenges.


In the South, growth rates of output and trade during 
the “Golden Age” were consistently higher  than  in 
previous periods but persistently lower than those in
advanced economies. Moreover, developing countries’ 
structure of trade remained highly unbalanced, domi-
nated by primary exports to Northern markets, which 
on average still accounted for two thirds of developing 
country exports at the end of the Golden Age.


Figure 2.3 shows the sharp asymmetry, in terms of 
world  tonnage,  in  the  participation  of  developing 


FIGURE 2.1 World trade, global output and related
elasticities, selected country groups
and periods, 1870–2016


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on Maddison (2006)
tables 1–3 and F-3 for data until 1973 and UNCTADstat
afterwards.


Note: The darker areas in panel A represent the contribution of devel-
oped countries to the corresponding world aggregates. Data in
panel A represent real annual compound growth rates, computed
using constant 1990 dollars between 1870 and 1973 and constant
2010 dollars between 1973 and 2016.


FIGURE 2.2 Share in global merchandise
exports, 1948–2017
(Percentage)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on UNCTADstat.
Note: Germany comprises Federal and Democratic Republics prior to


1990.


0


5


10


15


20


25


1948 1958 1968 1978 1988 1998 2008


Germany and Japan


United States


2017


FIGURE 2.3 Developing economies’ share of
trade by weight, 1970–2016
(Percentage)


Source: UNCTAD, 2017a: figure 1.4 (b).
Note: Data reflect share of total tonnage in world seaborne trade.


0


10


20


30


40


50


60


70


1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2016


Loaded


Unloaded


1870–
1913


1913–
1950


1950–
1973


1973–
1986


1986–
1998


1998–
2008


2008–
2016


0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9


10


1870–
1913


1913–
1950


1950–
1973


1973–
1986


1986–
1998


1998–
2008


2008–
2016


A. Average annual growth and group contribution
(Percentage)


Production Trade


0.0


0.5


1.0


1.5


2.0


2.5


3.0
B. Export elasticity of economic output


World Developed countries Developing countries




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


38


BOX 2.1 Measurement challenges in mapping international “trade”


The statistical recording of “trade” has become increasingly complex, as more production across the world 
is organized by GVCs and so parts and components of products, as well as the services that are embedded 
in traded products, cross borders several times.a Moreover, a growing share of traded services (particularly 
services deriving from intangible assets with no determined geographical location, such as financial loans or 
IPR licensing) represent intra-firm trade, much of which used for tax optimization strategies of firms. Unlike 
regular trade between distinct firms, such trades often do not generate any production, employment and labour 
income in the low-tax jurisdictions where they are recorded, even as they siphon capital income and profit out 
of higher-tax jurisdictions. These distortions are most visible in offshore financial centres, but they also occur 
in a less perceptible manner in much larger countries.


Such processes create obstacles to a mapping of world trade that accurately reflects production, employment, 
and capital and labour incomes. At present, the basic principle for the compilation of trade statistics is the 
crossing  of  a  border,  following  recommendations made  by  the United Nations  Statistical Commission. 
Because trade in goods necessarily involves crossing a border at a customs checkpoint, merchandise trade 
has long been reasonably accurately registered, at least to the extent that states properly performed their core 
functions. However, as production has fragmented along GVCs, the growing trade in intermediate goods and 
services embedded in final goods as well as reimports tend to exaggerate the trade performance of countries 
with large processing trade sectors, such as China. This can distort the mapping of global trade, which is why 
statistical offices and researchers have created and are using trade in value added databases, such as TiVA or 
WIOD (which are also used in this Report). Even though such value added data rely on input–output tables 
and reductionist assumptions, such as the reliance on a representative firm for each industry-country (e.g. see 
discussion in Koopman et al., 2014; Johnson, forthcoming 2018), these efforts represent an improvement over 
gross trade data.


But trade in services creates additional complications and difficulties for the measurement of cross-border 
trade. This is essentially because of the non-tangible nature of most services: unlike merchandise trade, these 
services do not cross borders in physical forms that enable classification according to commodity codes, quantity, 
origin and destination. They do not have to go through the customs procedures that are crucial for collecting 
merchandise trade data. So trade in services is not recorded in customs-based data. Effectively it only exists in 
the balance-of-payments accounts, which consider only whether there was a change in the country of residence 
of the owner of the goods and services that are exchanged, rather than whether and how they crossed borders.b


However, services now account for the bulk of global GDP, and their share in international trade is growing. 
In the past, some economists may have labelled all services as “non-tradable”, but the growing importance of 
services in recent trade negotiations and in the new generation of trade agreements (box 2.2) show that this 
approach is obsolete. According to some estimates, the share of services in total trade in value added exceeds 
50 per cent in many developed countries and could now have reached 40 per cent at the global level, compared 
to 30 per cent in 1980 (World Bank et al., 2017). The rising share of traded services in value added terms stands 
in contrast with the share of traded services in gross terms, which remained unchanged at about 20 per cent of 
total (goods and services) gross trade since 1980. This difference arises from the embedding of intermediate 
services into final goods, which tends to inflate the relative magnitude of gross trade in goods.


Data on trade in value added may correct to some extent the biases created by production fragmentation along 
GVCs, but they do not address the fundamental difficulty of assessing the real or fictive nature of reported 
flows of trade in services. As noted above, unlike physical goods, services are intangible and their official 
geographical location is determined not by which borders they may have crossed, but by the residence of the 
owner of exchanged services. The measurement of some services, such as tourism, may not be affected by this 
problem, but only because it involves the travel of a natural person, who needs to physically pass through a 
customs checkpoint to cross a border. Many internationally traded services, however, do not involve international 
travel, and in an increasing share of cases, they do not even involve natural persons but only intangible exchange 
between companies. Such international transactions often represent fictitious intra-firm accounting techniques 
aiming at avoiding taxation, which biases the measurement of the “actual” amount of international trade in 
services. Contrary to a widely shared belief, almost no trade in goods is taking place within multinational firms, 
whose boundaries are increasingly determined by the use of a common set of intangible inputs, knowledge 
and the transfer of capabilities rather than by the transfer of goods (Ramondo et al., 2016; Atalay et al., 2014).


The growing significance of intangible assets, such as financial assets, patents, trademarks, rights to design, 
corporate logos, etc., has important implications for how companies behave as well as how economists and 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


39


trade analysts consider international trade. Mainstream trade economists still tend to believe that “[t]he decision 
about whether and where to build a foreign plant is quite separate from how and where to raise the financing 
for that plant” (Markusen, 2004: xii), and that the latter can simply be analysed as part of the traditional theory 
of capital flows. But multinational companies tend to treat issues of “residency” quite differently. For them, 
the location of intangible assets is one of the most significant instruments for minimizing tax liabilities, and 
therefore they can and do choose to locate their intangible assets in jurisdictions that minimize their aggregate 
tax payments. This can create “phantom trade flows” that do not represent genuine movements of services 
at all. As Lipsey (2009) has noted, economists therefore need to accept that there has been a change in the 
reality they are attempting to measure, rather than get fooled into believing that the recorded data represent 
the reality in such circumstances.


The extent to which this is a problem is easily seen from the example of TNCs of the United States, evident 
in figure 2.B1.1. The large and exploding incomes from investments abroad (much of which is in the form of 
intangible investment in IPR of various kinds, valued by the firms themselves) in low-tax or no-tax jurisdictions 
that do not constitute large markets in themselves, shows how important this strategy has become for the overall 
profitability of these large TNCs. Obviously this affects tax collection by government; but it also distorts our 
understanding of global trade in services.


One solution for disentangling growing flows of fictitious intra-firm trade in services from genuine trade in 
services would be for national statistical offices to produce accounts based on ownership rather than residency. 
Such accounts would net out the effects of phantom intra-firm transactions and provide a more accurate picture 
of trade in services. So far, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) of the United States is the only statistical 
office that regularly publishes an ownership-based current account for that country.c There have been several
attempts by civil society to push for country-by-country reporting of TNCs accounts, and the United Nations 
has also called for this in the discussions on financing for development (UNCTAD, 2017b). These proposals 
are very important not only for more transparency about intra-firm trade flows, and better knowledge about 
the true nature of trade in services, but also for raising the fiscal resources required by governments to meet 
the Sustainable Development Goals.


a  See e.g. Lipsey, 2009 and Feenstra et al., 2010 for a detailed discussion of the main issues at stake.


b  The concern of public authorities with the residency of the holders of goods and services has its origin in the gold 
standard monetary regime, which incentivized countries to track how much gold was in the hands of their nationals as 
a proxy for the demand for their national currency at a time when monetary authorities were constrained by the need
to preserve fixed exchange rates.


c  Research by Ramondo et al., 2016 and Atalay et al., 2014 cited above are based on these BEA data.


FIGURE 2.B1.1 Income of the United States on direct investment abroad, selected countries,
first quarter 2000 to first quarter 2018
(Billions of dollars)


Source: Setser and Frank, 2018, based on United States Bureau of Economic Analysis.
Note: Data correspond to the four-quarter trailing sum.


0


10


20


30


40


50


60


70


80
A. Selected offshore financial centres


Netherlands
Ireland LuxembourgBermuda


Switzerland


0


10


20


30


40


50


60


70


80
B. Other countries


GermanyChina Japan


2000Q1 2002Q2 2004Q3 2006Q4 2009Q1 2011Q2 2013Q3 2015Q4 2018Q1 2000Q1 2002Q2 2004Q3 2006Q4 2009Q1 2011Q2 2013Q3 2015Q4 2018Q1




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


40


economies in world seaborne trade, the main vector 
for  shipping goods.  In  1970,  almost  two  thirds  of 
world  tonnage were  loaded in (i.e. exported from) 
developing  countries, whereas  less  than  one fifth 
was  unloaded  (i.e.  imported  into)  there. This  gap 
contrasts with  developing  countries’  exports  and 
imports measured  in  nominal  terms, which were 
roughly equivalent. This difference is a reminder of 
the unfavourable terms of trade and the balance of
payment constraints that prevailed during that era due 
to developing countries’ relatively constrained role 
as providers of primary commodities.


The asymmetric structure of international trade and
lagging  growth  performance  of most  developing 
countries fuelled growing concerns among many of 
their policymakers over biases in the rules of the trad-
ing system. It also underpinned the idea of “unequal 
exchange”, which argued that the structure of world 
trade was responsible for the persistent inequality
between developed and developing economies. The 
worries  that  developing  economies would  remain 
marginalized and unable to take advantage of inter-
national trade provided the basis for the creation of
UNCTAD in 1964, to renegotiate trade rules so as 
to  loosen  the  constraints  on  catch-up  growth  and 
to redirect international cooperation in support of
diversification away from commodity dependence. 
However, signs of the success of the export-oriented 
growth model in the East Asian NIEs started to show 
in  the  late  1960s, with  a more  dramatic  accelera-
tion, demonstrated by  their  sharply  rising share  in 
global merchandise  exports,  from  the mid-1970s 
(TDR 2016).


Under pressure from a series of internal and exter-
nal shocks, the 1973–1986 period was difficult for 
advanced  and  developing  countries  alike,  except 
for  oil  exporters, who  enjoyed  significant  terms-
of-trade gains, as well as for first-tier NIEs, whose 
market shares  in manufacturing exports expanded. 
In part as a result of the slowdown in advanced
country  growth,  and  the  (short-lived)  recycling of 
petro-dollars to emerging economies, a discussion of 
southern markets replacing northern markets for each 
other exports (so-called South–South trade) briefly 
emerged (Lewis, 1979) but was abruptly cut short 
by the debt crisis in the early 1980s and subsequent 
structural  adjustment  programmes which  further 
repressed  growth,  particularly  in Africa  and Latin 
America. As  a  result,  the  annual  growth  of  trade 
almost halved in the 1973–1986 period compared to 
1950–1973. Meanwhile, the annual growth of global 


output decreased from about 5 per cent to 3 per cent. 
During this period, the South contributed a little over 
one tenth of global trade expansion, but to one third 
of the growth of world income.


2. Hyperglobalization: 1986–present


Starting from the mid-1980s, a new phase of trade 
expansion took place. In contrast with the two pre-
vious post-war periods included in figure 2.1 – the 
Golden Age and the subsequent turbulent decade – 
this new round of globalization was marked by very 
fast acceleration of  trade, especially  in some parts 
of the developing world. Until the GFC, the growth 
of world trade in real terms rebounded to an annual
average of more than 6 per cent, with the contribution 
of the South peaking at about half of this figure in 
the 2000s. This new era was also marked by a further 
increase  in  the  elasticity  of world  trade  to  global 
output, which peaked at 2.4 during the 1986–1998 
period  and  then  remained  close  to  2  during  the 
following decade  (figure  2.1.B).  Interestingly,  the 
growth of global output remained much lower (about 
2  percentage  points)  than  in  the Golden Age  era, 
which reflects the shift in the broad macroeconomic 
policy framework that led to higher unemployment 
and lower investment in developed economies, and 
thus lower growth (see e.g. TDR 1995: part three).


The metamorphosis  of  trade  started  around 1986, 
though significant measurement challenges remain 
in properly mapping international “trade” (box 2.1). 
This  period  coincides with  the  beginning  of  the 
Uruguay Round  and  came  in  the wake of  several 
important  political  shifts.  It  occurred when many 
developing countries were still adjusting to the debt 
crisis  by  abandoning  import-substitution  industri-
alization (ISI) and turning to more export-oriented 
strategies based on liberalized imports. It also coin-
cided with the end of the East–West divide and the 
rise  of  a  “new world  order”  dominated by  liberal 
ideology. On the supply side, the erosion of organized 
labour and the flexibilization of labour markets, along 
with the continued spread of technological progress 
(containerization,  information  and  communication 
technology (ICT), etc.), facilitated the fragmentation 
of production along GVCs and the coordination of 
complex processes across  long distances, with  the 
resulting  cross-border movement  of  inputs  instru-
mental  in  boosting  trade. This was  supported  by 
the  proliferation  of  free  trade  agreements  (FTAs) 
and  bilateral  investment  treaties  (BITs)  (box  2.2) 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


41


and subsequently by the accession of China to the
World Trade Organization  (WTO)  in  2001, which 
lowered the cost of labour by enlarging the globally 
available reserve army of workers. On the demand 
side,  the end of  full employment and  the growing 
deregulation of financial markets encouraged a shift 
from wage-driven to debt-driven aggregate demand 
in  large  advanced  economies;  that,  in  turn,  eased 
the balance-of-payments constraint, allowing some 
economies,  including  in  the  developing world,  to 
prolong asset booms for longer and, in turn, for other 
economies to tap into external demand to maintain
growth (TDR 2016: chap. I.C).


The trade acceleration was particularly strong in East 
and South-East Asia, based on mutually reinforcing 
dynamic interactions between profit, investment and 
exports  in  state-targeted  industrial  sectors; within 
this subgroup, the share of first-tier NIEs in world 
exports reached about one tenth of world trade in
the mid-1990s and stabilized at this level thereafter 
(figure 2.4). This successful profit–investment–export 
nexus was  accompanied  by  specific  policy meas-
ures aiming at promoting structural changes,  from 
resource-based to labour-intensive and subsequently
to technology-intensive production and exports, and 
by increased penetration of northern markets (TDR
1996: chap. II; TDR 2003: chap. IV). With some lag, 
China followed broadly the same strategy, although 
on a scale and speed never achieved before and with a
stronger presence of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). 
Chinese exports increased from less than 2 per cent 
of world trade in the mid-1980s to more than 13 per 
cent in 2016. This increase in China (on top of the 
first-tier NIEs) was associated with a  reduction  in 
developed countries’  share  in world  exports,  from 
nearly three quarters of gross merchandise exports in 
1986 to just over one half in 2016.3 This decline was
almost entirely due to the relative decline of North–
North trade, which decreased from more than 60 per 
cent of global trade to less than 40 per cent over the 
same period. Nevertheless, in most of the rest of the 
developing world, export shares remained roughly 
constant or sometimes even declined, except during 
the rising phase of the commodity price supercycle 
when major commodity exporters registered a tem-
porary increase of their market shares.


This mirrored changes in the destination of exports, 
which progressively shifted to developing countries. 
Between the mid-1980s and 2016, the share of world 
exports to developing and transition economies rose 
from roughly one quarter to one half. South–South 


trade  accounted  for more  than 50 per  cent  of  this 
increase, from a base of only one quarter of exports 
to the South in 1986. Since these data include trade 
in  intermediate goods,  these changes partly  reflect 
the expansion of GVCs, which have had significant 
impacts on  the geography of production of manu-
factured products. While gross trade data show that 
developing  countries’  gross  revenues  from manu-
facturing as a share of their total exports increased 
from about one half in 1995 to two thirds in 2016, 
this may overestimate the rise of the manufacturing 
in developing countries’ exports, partly because of 
double-counting problems arising in the context of 
GVCs (see box 2.1).4


Figure  2.5  provides  four  snapshots  of  the  global 
network of merchandise  trade  at  10-year  intervals 
from 1986 onwards. The 1986 figure illustrates the 
limited trade flows outside the developed economies, 
at a time when developing countries mostly provided 
raw material and energy sources to developed econo-
mies. In 1996, the increased role played by the most 


FIGURE 2.4 Total gross exports, selected country
groups and China, 1948–2016


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on UNCTADstat.


0


5


10


15


20


1948 1958 1968 1978 1988 1998 2008


A. Trillions of current dollars


0


20


40


60


80


100


1948 1958 1968 1978 1988 1998 2008


B. Percentage of world gross exports


2016


2016


Developed countries First-tier NIEs
China Rest of the world




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


42


BOX 2.2 Using laws not wisely but too well: The international legal framework in the era of GVCs


The expansion of GVCs has been closely connected with changes in the legal architecture of the international 
trading system. The number of trade agreements and other kinds of international economic treaties (such as 
bilateral agreements on investment protection, avoidance of double taxation, etc.) rose exponentially after 1990. 
In this process, TNCs headquartered mostly in developed countries found themselves in a privileged position 
to influence rule-making and to reorganize large swathes of world production, thereby creating possibilities 
of expanding their cost-minimizing strategies on a global scale.


FIGURE 2.B2.1 Trade and investment bilateral connections based on international agreements,
1960–2015
(Number of country pairs)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on de Sousa, 2012, and UNCTAD International Investment Agreements Navigator.
Note: Investment category does not include trade treaties with investment provisions (TIPs).


Between 1990  and 2015,  the  number of  trade  agreements  increased  from 50  to  279, with many of  them 
plurilateral and therefore involving a larger number of country pairs (figure 2.B2.1.A). Bilateral investment 
treaties (BITs) grew almost tenfold from 238 to 2,239 over the same period (figure 2.B2.1.B). These legal changes 
were designed to enhance international economic integration, boosting trade and cross-border  investment. 
However, they also greatly eased the possibilities for tangible asset acquisition, intangible asset shifting and 
financial speculation. As a result,  the main actors and beneficiaries of this metamorphosis of “trade” were 
not necessarily the populations in the concerned countries, but rather the largest corporate players that were 
involved in lobbying for and shaping the rules of international trade and finance.


Trade agreements prior to 1990 were mostly between neighbouring countries sharing comparable levels of 
economic development and labour protection, with the objective of promoting regional integration through 
trade (figure 2.B2.1.A). However, post-1990 agreements were more about increasing economic integration 
across regions and between developed and developing countries, promoting both more open trade (including 
processing trade) and liberalized capital flows. At the same time, the “depth” of such agreements kept increasing, 
bringing under their discipline many policy areas that had thus far been excluded from trade negotiations. 
Historically, trade agreements focused on issues pertaining mostly to tariffs and quotas. After 1995, so-called 
“WTO-plus” provisions included in most trade agreements (figure 2.B2.2.A) also covered customs regulations, 
export taxes, anti-dumping measures, countervailing duty measures, technical barriers to trade, and sanitary 
and phytosanitary standards. Other agreements further committed signatories to enforce provisions liberalizing 
financial services or public procurement, with far-reaching implications for public policy, employment and 
income distribution. As  to  “WTO-extra”  provisions  (figure  2.B2.2.B), which  are  not  discussed under  the 
WTO umbrella, they include a wide-ranging and expanding set of policy areas, which often further reduced 
developing countries’ policy space.


So-called “core” provisions are defined as the set of WTO-plus provisions and four WTO-extra provisions 
(competition policy, movement of capital,  investment and  investor rights protection, and IPR protection), 


0


200


400


600


800


1,000


1,200


1,400


1,600


1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


A. Trade


0


200


400


600


800


1,000


1,200


1,400


1,600


1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


B. Investment


North–North North–South South–South




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


43


because they are economically more meaningful, at least from the perspective of non-financial and financial 
TNCs alike. Interestingly, trade agreements between developed and developing countries cover on average 
almost as many policy areas (20) as those among developed countries (22) and thus have equivalent “depth”. 
This reflects the ability of developed country TNCs to insert provisions dear to their interests in agreements 
negotiated  by  their  governments. By  contrast,  South–South  trade  agreements  (13)  are  considered more 
“shallow”.


Almost 90 per cent of trade agreements include at least one of the core WTO-extra provisions and one third 
include all of them (Hofmann et al., 2017). By contrast, policy areas of great importance for social actors 
with much  lesser voice  in opaque closed-door  trade negotiations,  such as  the protection of  labour  rights, 
consumers and the environment or provisions preventing corporate tax avoidance, are barely included or remain 
legally unenforceable. If negotiators genuinely want “trade” and related agreements to become vehicles for 
more inclusive and sustainable development, they must begin by correcting this glaring asymmetry (Namur 
Declaration, 2016; Kohler and Storm, 2016; Piketty, 2016).


It has been noted that the expansion of trade agreements and their increasing depth after 1990 are a testimony 
to greater leverage of large exporters in trade negotiations, which exceeds the leverage of importers (Rodrik, 


2018). Hence, it is likely that such agreements are increasingly becoming a mechanism for promoting rent-
seeking by large exporting firms, especially through provisions pertaining to IPR, cross-border capital flows, 
investor–state dispute settlement procedures and the harmonization of regulatory standards, etc., which have 
little to do with “trade” in the strict sense.


As the meaning of “trade” is  increasingly adrift, what economists commonly label as “trade agreements” 
should rather be properly designated as “comprehensive economic and trade agreements”. Accordingly, their 
impact on distribution,  jobs and welfare should be assessed using more comprehensive models  including 
macrofinancial  linkages,  rather  than  narrow  trade models, which  incorporate many flawed  assumptions, 
such as full employment of production factors of constant distribution, thus ruling out a priori any risks and 
costs associated with deeper “trade” liberalization (Kohler and Storm, 2016). In addition to ensuring greater 
voice to civil society and to concerned stakeholders in the process of negotiating these legal agreements, it 
is important to incorporate into such treaties both greater accountability and flexibility to change clauses in 
the light of experience.


FIGURE 2.B2.2 WTO-plus and WTO-extra policy areas included in trade agreements
(Number of treaties)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on Hofmann et al., 2017.


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


Ta
rif


fs
o


n
in


du
st


ria
l g


oo
ds


Ta
rif


fs
o


n
ag


ric
ul


tu
ra


l g
oo


ds
C


us
to


m
s


E
xp


or
t t


ax
es


A
nt


id
um


pi
ng


Te
ch


ni
ca


l b
ar


rie
rs


to
tr


ad
e


S
an


ita
ry


/P
hy


to
sa


ni
ta


ry
S


ta
te


a
id


G
A


TS
C


ou
nt


er
va


ili
ng


m
ea


su
re


s
TR


IP
s


P
ub


lic
p


ro
cu


re
m


en
t


S
ta


te
tr


ad
in


g
en


te
rp


ris
es


TR
IM


s


C
om


pe
tit


io
n


P
ol


ic
y


In
ve


st
m


en
t


M
ov


em
en


t o
f C


ap
ita


l
IP


R
E


nv
iro


nm
en


ta
l L


aw
s


In
fo


rm
at


io
n


S
oc


ie
ty


V
is


a
an


d
A


sy
lu


m
R


eg
io


na
l C


oo
pe


ra
tio


n
A


gr
ic


ul
tu


re
La


bo
ur


M
ar


ke
t R


eg
ul


at
io


n
R


es
ea


rc
h


an
d


Te
ch


no
lo


gy
E


co
no


m
ic


P
ol


ic
y


D
ia


lo
gu


e
In


du
st


ria
l C


oo
pe


ra
tio


n
E


ne
rg


y
E


du
ca


tio
n


an
d


Tr
ai


ni
ng


P
ub


lic
A


dm
in


is
tra


tio
n


S
ta


tis
tic


s
C


on
su


m
er


P
ro


te
ct


io
n


C
ul


tu
ra


l C
oo


pe
ra


tio
n


P
ol


iti
ca


l D
ia


lo
gu


e
S


M
E


S
oc


ia
l M


at
te


rs
Fi


na
nc


ia
l A


ss
is


ta
nc


e
Ta


xa
tio


n
A


nt
i C


or
ru


pt
io


n
D


at
a


P
ro


te
ct


io
n


A
pp


ro
xi


m
at


io
n


of
L


eg
is


la
tio


n
H


ea
lth


In
no


va
tio


n
P


ol
ic


ie
s


Ill
ic


it
D


ru
gs


A
ud


io
V


is
ua


l
H


um
an


R
ig


ht
s


M
in


in
g


Ill
eg


al
Im


m
ig


ra
tio


n
M


on
ey


L
au


nd
er


in
g


Te
rr


or
is


m
N


uc
le


ar
S


af
et


y
C


iv
il


P
ro


te
ct


io
n


A. WTO-plus policy areas in
trade agreements


B. WTO-extra policy areas in trade agreements


Included Legally enforceable




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


44


advanced economies in Asia was already evident, as 
was the shift in this region away from commodity-
based exports. Ten years later, the significant change 
was  the  increased  significance  of China,  even  as 
intra-European  trade  strengthened  further. Around 
this time, there had been a gradual shift within Asia, 
as China overtook Japan as the largest exporter from 
the region in 2004, and then became the world’s larg-
est exporter in 2007.5 Overall, this strengthened the 
East Asian hub in the global trade network. Finally, 


by 2016, China registered an even greater share in 
world exports, together with other advanced Asian 
economies.


Beyond the rise of South–South flows depicted by 
the increased links between developing regions over 
the decades, what figure 2.5 shows is the restructur-
ing of the Asian pole in global trade, most of all the 
growth  acceleration  and  structural  transformation 
in China. This  then  spilled over  to  the  rest  of  the 


FIGURE 2.5  Global network of merchandise trade, selected years, 1986–2016


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on the United Nations Comtrade database.
Note: The node size and edge width depict export flows as a share of world gross product. The node/edge colour reflects the commodity versus


manufacture intensity. The direction of edges is clockwise. When the exports of a given node are less than 5 per cent of its total exports, the
edges are not reported. “Advanced Asia” refers to Australia, Japan, New Zealand, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong (China) and
Taiwan Province of China.


1986 1996


20162006


North America


Advanced Asia


Europe


Africa


Latin America and the Caribbean


Other Asia


West Asia


China


North America


Advanced Asia


Europe


Africa


Latin America and the Caribbean


Other Asia


West Asia


China


Transition economies


North America


Advanced Asia


Europe


Africa


Latin America and the Caribbean


Other Asia


West Asia


China


Transition economies


North America


Advanced Asia


Europe


Africa


Latin America and the Caribbean


Other Asia


West Asia


Transition economies


China


Percentage of manufactures in total exports
0 50 100




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


45


developing world, mainly  in  the  form of  boosted 
demand for raw materials. Consequently, apart from 
some successful cases in Asia, there has been very lit-
tle evidence of broad-based trade-induced structural
change in other parts of the developing world regions. 
Hyperspecialization  has  in  fact  accompanied  the 
acceleration of trade from the 1990s, including with 
the rise of South–South trade (Hanson, 2012; Escaith 
and Gaudin, 2014). This, in part, reflects the rever-
sion in many developing countries to primary export 
dependence against the backdrop of rising commod-
ity prices from the start of the millennium but it is also


a reflection of asymmetric power relations between 
lead  firms  and  suppliers  in manufacturing  value 
chains and weak bargaining positions for developing 
countries. The experiences of Mexico and Central 
American countries as assembly manufacturers, for 
example, have been linked to the creation of enclave 
economies, with few domestic linkages and limited, 
if any, upgrading (Gallagher and Zarsky, 2007; Paus, 
2014). The same can be said about the electronics and 
automotive industries in Eastern and Central Europe
(Plank and Staritz, 2013; Pavlínek, 2016; Pavlínek 
and Ženka, 2016).


The  “rise  of  the South”  in  international  trade  has 
been  a much-cited  feature  of  hyperglobalization, 
disrupting  the  dominant  pattern  of North–North 
trade in the previous era of managed globalization, 
and establishing a landscape in which North–South 
and South–South trade have assumed greater weight. 
BRICS6  have  become  symbolic  of  this  changing 
landscape but GVCs are seen as its great disruptors.


On closer examination, the gap between BRICS and 
RIBS7 is a significant one (figure 2.6) and the rise of 
the South refers primarily to the singular experience 
of  some Asian  countries  in  trading manufactured 
products. As discussed in TDR 2016, these economies 
(beginning with the first-tier NIEs followed, albeit 
more restrained, by a second tier in South-East Asia, 
and then more dramatically by China) have managed 
to narrow the income gaps with richer countries based 
on  the  establishment  of  leading  industrial  sectors, 
along with related technological and social capabili-
ties  that have promoted upgrading, and,  through a 
series of linkages, diversification into new sectors. On 
this basis, these tiger economies (albeit with variation 
across them) were able to combine a strong rise in the 
share of manufacturing output and employment with 
strong labour productivity growth. In most cases, a 
rapid pace of investment helped to tap both learning 
and scale economies, sustaining rapid productivity 
growth. Yet, a rise in exports – due to a robust invest-
ment–export nexus – was also key to this pattern of 
expansion. In the absence of such linkages in other 
developing regions, the export of manufactures has 
been a poorer predictor of productivity growth dur-
ing this period.


As a result, in 2016, Asia alone accounted for about 
88 per cent of developing country gross exports of 
manufactures  to  the world,  and  for 93 per cent of 
South–South trade in manufactures, while East Asia 
alone accounted for 72 per cent of both.8 To a lesser
extent,  the  increase of  the South’s  share  in global 
exports in this century was also the result of increased
export revenues of commodity exporters during the 
2000s supercycle.


Trade in Value-Added (TiVA) data show the evolution 
of exports in both developed and developing coun-
tries (figure 2.7). In value added terms, developing 


C. Trade-charged structural change: Diverging paths
among developing regions


FIGURE 2.6 Share of BRICS versus RIBS in
world economy, 1990–2016
(Percentage)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on UNCTADstat.
Note: Underlying data corresponds to the sum of GDP in current dollars.


0


5


10


15


20


25


1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 2016


RIBS


BRICS




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


46


countries’  exports  in  2011 were  still  smaller  than 
those  from developed  countries:  $6.4  trillion  ver-
sus  $8.2  trillion.  Figure  2.7.B  also  indicates  the 
rapid development  of China  and first-tier NIEs  in 
manufactured  products,  along with  the  increasing 
export share of the extractive industries in the rest
of  the  developing world. The  increase  in  exports 
from the remaining sectors of the rest of developing 
countries was far less significant: amounting to only 
$2.7 trillion in 2011, compared to $6.4 trillion worth 
of  exports  from China  and  the first-tier NIEs  (all 
three sectors) along with other developing countries’ 
exports of extractive industries.


Similar conclusions arise by looking at the country 
level. Table 2.1 shows how China has been more of an 
outlier, one of very few countries that have managed 
to increase their shares of manufacturing domestic 
value  added  in  gross  exports  (an  11.9  percentage 
point increase between 1995 and 2014). The trajec-
tory of China has benefited from a well-calibrated 
industrial  policy  to  help  exploit  growing demand 
from developed  countries  (e.g.  Poon,  2014). This 
experience was not common: out of 27 developing 
entities recorded in TiVA, only 6 others experienced 
increases,  albeit  of much  smaller magnitudes:  the 
Philippines, 7.4 percentage points (from a very low 
starting point); Indonesia, 4.3; Argentina, 2.3; Viet 
Nam, 2.1; Turkey, 1.8; and Mexico, 0.4.


Instead, for many developing countries, trade under 
hyperglobalization strengthened the economic weight 
of  extractive  industries, whose  share  in  aggregate 
domestic value added exported by developing coun-
tries (not their gross exports as shown in table 2.1) 
rose  from 1995 by  almost  nine  percentage  points 
to reach 21.5 per cent in 2011. Eighteen out of 27 
developing and emerging market economies experi-
enced increases in the shares of extractive industries
in  export  value  added.  Some  like  the  Russian 
Federation,  Brazil,  Colombia,  Peru  and  Brunei 
Darussalam  (along with  the  “rest  of  the world”, 
which covers many African and smaller developing 
countries), showed  increases of more  than 10 per-
centage points.9 This may partly reflect price effects 
during the commodity boom, but the persistence of 
such effects over many years has strengthened incen-
tives for investment in extractive industries, private 
and public, resulting in higher volumes. In the long 
run, this is likely to further entrench dependence on 
extractive industries, with adverse implications for 
structural change.


Table 2.1 shows that production fragmentation along 
GVCs also resulted in a declining share of domestic 
value added in gross exports, also known as verti-
cal  specialization  (Hummels  et  al.,  2001),  in  both 
developed  and  developing  countries.10 This share
dropped  in  developed  countries  by  7  percentage 


FIGURE 2.7  World trade in value added by sectors, selected country groups, 1995–2011


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on TiVA database.
Note: “Services” includes electricity, water and gas supply, and construction.


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


0


20


40


60


80


100


1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011


Tr
illi


on
s


of
c


ur
re


nt
d


ol
la


rs


P
er


ce
nt


ag
e


A. Developed countries


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


0


20


40


60


80


100


1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011


Tr
illi


on
s


of
c


ur
re


nt
d


ol
la


rs


P
er


ce
nt


ag
e


B. Developing countries


Services
Manufacturing
Agriculture and extractive
Total value (right scale)


Value excl. NIEs (right scale)
Value excl. NIEs and China (right scale)
Value excl. NIEs, China and commodities
(i.e. “Rest of the South” non-commodities) (right scale)




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


47


points  to  75.8  per  cent, while  that  in  developing 
countries fell by 4 percentage points to 75.3 per cent. 
But this more muted decline in developing countries 
was due to only two factors: for China, spectacular 
manufacturing expansion that entailed an increase in 
domestic value added in gross exports, and the grow-
ing weight of extractive industries in the trade balance 
of other developing countries. Excluding both China 
and extractive industries, the share of domestic value 
added in other developing countries’ exports declined 
by 11 percentage points, an even sharper decline than 
in developed countries. This highlights some of the 
challenges that countries face when their firms link 
to GVCs (section D).


Figure 2.8 disaggregates  the  total exports of devel-
oping  countries  by  the  technological  intensity  of 
products, using the TDR 2002 classification of labour 
skill levels and technology intensity. While some cau-
tion is warranted with this approach,11 it also points
to  significant  differences  across  countries  in  both 
structure and dynamics. On the one hand, the first-tier 
NIEs and China display clear trends towards tech-
nological upgrading, even  though questions  remain 
about the extent to which this has benefited workers 
employed  at  the  assembly  stage  in manufacturing 
GVCs (see section D.1). By contrast, Africa and West 
Asia showed limited progress as their exports remain 
extremely concentrated in commodities, with hardly 


TABLE 2.1  Value added shares in gross exports of developing economies, level and changes, 1995–2014


Level of domestic
value added in
gross exports


in 2014
(Percentage)


Changes in value added shares in gross exports since 1995
(Percentage points)


FOREIGN DOMESTIC


Agriculture and
extractives


Manufacturing Servicesa


Argentina 87.5 6.8 1.0 2.3 -10.1
Brazil 87.6 4.7 17.6 -16.5 -5.8
Brunei Darussalamb 95.7 -3.0 15.5 -2.6 -9.8
Cambodia 61.6 25.6 -32.4 -3.2 10.0
Chile 81.1 4.8 1.5 -2.7 -3.6
China 70.7 -1.7 -2.8 11.9 -7.4
Colombia 91.1 0.5 9.0 -1.2 -8.3
Costa Rica 73.5 4.4 -9.7 -2.3 7.6
India 79.0 11.6 -3.5 -12.9 4.8
Indonesia 88.0 0.1 3.7 4.3 -8.1
Malaysia 60.9 8.7 1.4 -5.8 -4.3
Mexico 66.5 6.1 0.0 0.4 -6.5
Morocco 75.0 6.1 -7.6 -6.5 8.0
Peru 87.4 2.7 22.5 -15.5 -9.7
Philippines (the) 76.3 -6.1 1.4 7.4 -2.7
Republic of Korea 62.2 15.5 -0.6 -6.1 -8.8
Russian Federation (the) 86.3 0.8 8.7 -6.4 -3.1
Saudi Arabia 96.4 -0.6 5.3 -0.3 -4.4
Singapore 59.5 -1.6 -0.1 -4.2 5.9
South Africa 79.3 7.5 8.3 -12.3 -3.5
Thailand 62.7 13.1 1.1 -5.1 -9.1
Tunisia 65.9 9.3 2.7 -1.5 -10.5
Turkey 78.2 12.9 -0.3 1.8 -14.4
Viet Nam 63.7 14.6 -5.8 2.1 -10.9
Hong-Kong, China 79.6 -1.1 -0.3 -14.3 15.7
Taiwan Province of China 56.9 12.5 -0.2 -9.6 -2.7
Rest of the Worldb 89.5 -2.8 12.1 -4.9 -4.5


Developing economiesb 75.3 4.2 4.3 -3.5 -5.1
Developed economiesb 75.8 7.2 1.7 -10.1 1.1


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on TiVA database.
Note: All other developing countries in the database are listed, including the category “Rest of the world”, which covers many medium and small


developing countries. TiVA’s 37 developed countries are not reported here.
a “Services” also includes electricity, water and gas supply, and construction.
b Data only available until 2011.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


48


any increase in shares of technology-intensive manu-
factures, regardless of their labour skill levels. Latin 
America and the rest of South, South-East and East 
(SSEE) Asia fell between these two extremes. In Latin 
America, the 1990s were a period of some structural 
change with technological upgrading, but this pattern 
partly reversed during the commodity supercycle. As 
the commodity price boom receded, Latin America’s 
trade structure returned to its position of the late 1990s. 
Although exports in current dollars more than doubled 
over this period, the data suggest that overall, techno-
logical upgrading did not really take place.


In the rest of SSEE Asia, tendencies towards relative 
technological upgrading appeared in export data only 
in the 2000s, with a shift towards high-skill labour 
and  technology-intensive  goods. However,  there 
is  still a  long way  to go  to  reach even  the current 
structure  of China  and  the first-tier NIEs.  Indeed, 
the share of commodities and labour-intensive and
resource-intensive manufactures, though declining, 
remained relatively high, at almost 30 per cent each.


Analysing exports by destinations sheds additional 
light on the underlying drivers. Figure 2.9.A–C show 
how export structures have changed in the develop-
ing regions of Africa, Latin America and SSEE Asia 
(except China and the NIEs), for the following des-
tinations: (i) developed countries, (ii) intraregional, 
(iii) China, and (iv) developing countries other then 
China and the two tiers of Asian NIEs.


Figure  2.9.A  illustrates  that Africa’s  exports were 
highly concentrated in commodities. This was most 
evident for exports to China, and for exports to devel-
oped countries, and to a slightly lesser extent for other 
non-African trade partners. By contrast, intraregional 
trade was more in line with technological upgrading, 
with  slightly  larger  shares of  technology-intensive 
manufactures.


In Latin America, the export structure depended even 
more on its trade partners. In exports to developed 
economies, there was an increase in the share of tech-
nology-  and medium-skill-intensive manufactures. 


FIGURE 2.8  Export structure by technological levels, selected developing regions, 1990–2016
(Percentage and trillions of dollars)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on Comtrade database.
Note: The product classification comes from UNCTAD TDR 2002.


a South, South-East and East Asia does not comprise China and NIEs (both tiers).


A. Africa


Medium- and high-skill and technology-intensive manufactures (percentage)
Processed commodities and low-skill manufactures (percentage)
Unprocessed commodities (percentage)
Value of total exports (trillions of current dollars, right scale)


0.0


0.1


0.2


0.3


0.4


0.5


0.6


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016
0.0


0.2


0.4


0.6


0.8


1.0


1.2


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


B. Latin America and the Caribbean


0.0


0.5


1.0


1.5


2.0


2.5


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


C. China


0.0


0.5


1.0


1.5


2.0


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


D. First-tier NIEs


0.0


0.2


0.4


0.6


0.8


1.0


1.2


1.4


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


E. West Asia


0.0


0.1


0.2


0.3


0.4


0.5


0.6


0.7


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


F. South, South-East and East Asiaa




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


49


However,  this  destination  became  relatively  less 
important for Latin American exports. Meanwhile, 
intraregional  trade  consisted  of more  diversified 
goods,  with  technology-intensive manufactures 
accounting for about one half. Exports to China and 
other developing countries and transition economies 
remained highly concentrated in commodities, and 


this pattern strengthened from the mid-2000s, to the 
extent that in 2016, 90 per cent of Latin America’s 
exports to China consisted of commodities.


In  SSEE Asian  economies  excluding China  and 
the NIEs,  overall  exports  experienced  a  process 
of  upgrading. Exports  to  all  destinations  showed 


FIGURE 2.9 Export structure by technological levels and selected partners,
selected developing regions, 1990–2016
(Percentage and trillions of dollars)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on Comtrade database.
a South, South-East and East Asia does not comprise China and NIEs (both tiers).
b Rest of the world excludes NIEs (both tiers).


A. Africa


Medium- and high-skill and technology-intensive manufactures (percentage)
Processed commodities and low-skill manufactures (percentage)
Unprocessed commodities (percentage)


Value of total exports (trillions of current dollars, right scale)


B. Latin America and the Caribbean C. South, South-East and East Asiaa


Share in total exports (percentage)


0.00
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.25
0.30
0.35
0.40


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


To
d


ev
el


op
ed


c
ou


nt
rie


s


0.00
0.10
0.20
0.30
0.40
0.50
0.60
0.70


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016
0.00


0.05


0.10


0.15


0.20


0.25


0.30


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


0.00


0.02


0.04


0.06


0.08


0.10


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


In
tr


a-
re


gi
on


al


0.00


0.05


0.10


0.15


0.20


0.25


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016
0.00


0.01


0.02


0.03


0.04


0.05


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


0.00
0.01
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.05
0.06
0.07


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


C
hi


na


0.00


0.02


0.04


0.06


0.08


0.10


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016
0.00


0.01


0.02


0.03


0.04


0.05


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


0.00


0.02


0.04


0.06


0.08


0.10


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016


Re
st


o
f t


he
w


or
ld


b


0.00


0.02


0.04


0.06


0.08


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016
0.00


0.05


0.10


0.15


0


20


40


60


80


100


1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2016




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


50


a relative decrease of commodities as well as of
labour- and resource-intensive manufactures over
the  last  decade. This  pattern was  less  pronounced 
for the exports to China due to an increased share of
labour- and resource-intensive manufactures, which 
suggest that the flying geese development paradigm 
(TDR 1997) remains at an early stage. Exports to all 
remaining developing countries and transition econo-
mies had the greatest share of technology-intensive 
goods, with high-skill labour-intensive manufactures 
representing the largest share.


This suggests that the rapid development of China 
(and more generally East and South-East Asia) has 


not triggered significant positive structural changes 
in the export structures of other developing regions; 
rather,  it  has  intensified  their  role  as  providers  of 
commodities. This need not be a negative outcome, 
if the revenues from such exports are used to finance 
domestic economic diversification and  technologi-
cal  upgrading. But  such  a  push  typically  requires 
systematic industrial policies in a context of rising 
domestic demand. In practice, such examples are not 
that common. By contrast, intraregional trade seems 
to have the greatest potential in terms of providing 
support to move up the ladder, confirming the validity 
of previous UNCTAD calls for strengthening regional 
trade (UNCTAD, 2013).


D. Trade and inequality under hyperglobalization


Trade under hyperglobalization, and the associated 
expansion of GVCs,  is  often  pitched  as widening 
the  opportunities  for  inclusive  growth  and  shared 
prosperity. The underlying assumption is that because 
GVCs allow developing countries to focus on indi-
vidual links in the chain, their firms can integrate with 
the world economy “on a shoestring” without facing 
the large risks (and costs) incurred by investing in all 
the tasks required for producing the finished product 
or services (e.g. World Bank et al., 2017). According 
to this view, developing countries can thereby more 
easily reap the benefits of their major comparative 
advantage:  abundant  cheap  labour.  Following  this 
logic, such integration in the global economy should 
lead to a reduction of inequality in the South as
demand for unskilled labour increases.


Reality is, unfortunately, less obliging. Indeed, it is 
now increasingly acknowledged that trade patterns 
under hyperglobalization contributed  to polarizing 
domestic income and wealth distribution not only in
the North (e.g. Harrison et al., 2011; Temin, 2017), 
but  also  in  the South  (e.g. Goldberg and Pavcnik, 
2007; Pavcnik,  2017),  thus  exacerbating domestic 
economic  inequalities. Recently-released data  that 
enable the disaggregation of the value added along 
GVCs  support  this  view. They  suggest  that  these 
outcomes are partly the result of the proliferation of
GVCs and partly due to the behaviour of lead firms, 
mostly large TNCs that are today the most significant 
players in international trade.


This  section  examines  this  question.  Section D.1 
reports  new  evidence  that GVCs  and  the  spread 


of low-productivity assembly lines in export
processing  zones  (EPZs)  across  the  South  have 
not  just  contributed  to  suppressing  the wages  of 
manufacturing workers in the North, but have also 
exacerbated  the  income gap between manufactur-
ing workers  and  owners  of  capital  in  developing 
countries.  Section D.2  analyses  the  rise  of  export 
market concentration under hyperglobalization, and 
the associated increase in the ability of large firms 
to extract rents. Much as was argued in TDR 2017, 
the  evidence  is  that  increased  rents  have  largely 
resulted from newer and more intangible barriers to 
competition,  reflected  in heightened protection for 
IPR and abilities to exploit national rules and regula-
tions for profit-shifting and tax-avoidance purposes. 
The consequent increase in returns from monopolies
generated by IPR as well as a reduction in the relative 
tax costs of larger companies creates an uneven play-
ing field. The empirical exercises carried out for this 
Report suggest that the surge in the profitability of top 
TNCs – a proxy for the very large firms dominating 
international trade and finance – together with their 
growing concentration, has acted as a major  force 
pushing down the global labour income share, thus 
exacerbating personal income inequality.


Overall, these negative effects of international trade 
on inequality echo the concerns expressed by Raul 
Prebisch on the prevalence of oligopolistic enterprises 
in exports of manufactures and how export market 
structures can affect income distribution. However, 
as Milberg and Winkler (2013: 280–281) note, today 
this is less about the nature of the product exported and
more about the governance of GVC where, “[m]any 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


51


lead firms  in global production networks maintain 
markups by operating in factor or input markets that 
are  increasingly oligopolistic. Buying practices  of 
lead firms can lead to shaving markups and cost cut-
ting by suppliers that leave them unable to innovate 
and  resistant  to  improvements  in wages  or  labour 
standards”. These processes also have wider mac-
roeconomic repercussions, discussed in section E.


1. GVCs, jobs offshoring, processing
trade and income polarization in
manufacturing


Recently developed decomposition techniques shed 
new light on trends in income distribution following 
the global fragmentation of production. The World 
Input–Output Database (WIOD)12 provides data sug-
gesting that the reshaping of global manufacturing 
production and trade increased inequality in both
developed  and  developing  countries. Changes  in 


factor income shares in global manufacturing GVCs 
between 1995 and 2008 mostly benefited the own-
ers of capital, in the North as well as in the South. 
Globally, their share in income along all manufactur-
ing GVCs increased by 6.5 percentage points to reach 
47.4 per cent in 2008. High-skilled workers also ben-
efited, although to a more limited extent. The share of 
low-skilled workers, who represent the demographic 
majority in the South, declined sharply by 6.3 per cent 
(Timmer et al., 2014). This challenges a key predic-
tion of the Heckscher-Ohlin model that underpins the 
narrative of GVCs as vehicles for reducing inequality 
(e.g. Lopez Gonzalez et al., 2015).13


Examining how value  added  is  distributed  across 
capital and labour – split in two business functions 
(i.e. headquarter and fabrication)14 performed along 
the “smile curve” – confirms this analysis (de Vries 
et al., 2018). At the global level, the share of capital 
income in manufacturing GVCs increased by 3 per-
centage points between 2000 and 2014 (table 2.2). 


TABLE 2.2  Shares in exported value added in manufacturing GVCs, 2000–2014


Global level


2000 2014 Difference


Capital 44.8 47.8 3.0
Labour 55.2 52.2 -3.0
Headquarter functions 31.7 30.4 -1.3
Fabrication 23.5 21.8 -1.7


Country groups


High income China Other countries
2000 2014 Difference 2000 2014 Difference 2000 2014 Difference


Capital 40.3 42.3 2.0 57.0 49.6 -7.5 59.2 59.4 0.2
Labour 59.7 57.7 -2.0 43.0 50.4 7.5 40.8 40.6 -0.2
Headquarter functions 35.2 37.0 1.7 13.6 19.7 6.0 22.5 23.7 1.1
Fabrication 24.5 20.8 -3.7 29.3 30.8 1.4 18.3 16.9 -1.3


Selected countries


Brazil Indonesia India
2000 2014 Difference 2000 2014 Difference 2000 2014 Difference


Capital 49.1 43.2 -5.9 59.9 59.0 -0.9 56.6 60.6 4.0
Labour 50.9 56.8 5.9 40.1 41.0 0.9 43.4 39.4 -4.0
Headquarter functions 22.3 30.3 8.0 25.6 27.6 2.0 29.7 28.9 -0.8
Fabrication 28.6 26.5 -2.1 14.5 13.3 -1.1 13.7 10.5 -3.2


Mexico Russian Federation Turkey
2000 2014 Difference 2000 2014 Difference 2000 2014 Difference


Capital 68.3 76.7 8.4 51.3 47.4 -3.9 59.3 62.5 3.2
Labour 31.7 23.3 -8.4 48.7 52.6 3.9 40.7 37.5 -3.2
Headquarter functions 13.0 10.5 -2.4 22.4 30.5 8.1 17.0 15.3 -1.7
Fabrication 18.8 12.8 -6.0 26.3 22.1 -4.2 23.7 22.2 -1.5


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on WIOD (2016).
Note: WIOD (2016 release) includes 43 countries plus one category for the “rest of the world”, which is only included in the global aggregate figures.


“High income” covers 34 countries, including the high-income developing economies of the Republic of Korea and Taiwan Province of China.
“Other countries” includes two developed countries (Bulgaria and Romania) and six developing countries and transition economies (Brazil,
India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Russian Federation and Turkey). All manufacturing sectors are included.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


52


Meanwhile,  the  income  share  accruing  to work-
ers  at  the  fabrication  stage, who are good proxies 
for  low-  and medium-skilled  labour,  declined  by 
3.7  percentage  points  in  high-income  countries 
and 1.3  percentage points  in most  of G20  emerg-
ing  economies  but China  (together with Bulgaria 
and Romania) which  are  regrouped  under  “other 
countries”. Additional findings  provided  by Chen 
et al. (2017) and WIPO (2017) indicate that rising 
capital  income was  driven  by  growing  returns  to 
intangible  assets, whose  share  in  value  added  of 
global manufacturing trade is estimated to have risen 
from 27.8 per cent to 31.9 per cent between 2000 and 
2007, representing almost twice the share of income 
accruing to tangible capital.


The only place where the share of labour income in
fabrication increased is China, the “world factory”, 
though only by 1.4 percentage points. By contrast, 
the income share of more skilled Chinese workers 
employed in pre- and post-fabrication stages, labelled 
under “headquarter functions”, increased by 6.0 per-
centage  points. Together with  evidence  of  rising 
personal inequality in China (e.g. Galbraith, 2012), 
these findings support the hypothesis that the relative 
increase in the income share of less-skilled workers 
was driven by growing employment in manufacturing 
assembly lines (the quantity effect) rather than by an 
increase in the relative wage income of those work-
ers compared to high-skilled workers and capitalists 
(the price effect).


In other developing countries, negative relative price 
effects combined with negligible or negative quan-
tity effects depressed the income shares of low- and
medium-skilled workers employed at the fabrication 
stage. Consequently, the share in value added accru-
ing to fabrication declined in developing countries 
between 2000 and 2014, by 2.1 percentage points in 
Brazil, 1.1 in Indonesia, 3.2 in India, 6.0 in Mexico, 
4.2  in  the Russian  Federation  and  1.5  in Turkey 
(table 2.2). Though the labour income share in export 
manufacturing  increased  in Brazil,  Indonesia  and 
the Russian Federation,  it benefited only a minor-
ity of more skilled workers performing headquarter 
functions. In India, Mexico and Turkey, the share of 
capital increased unambiguously to the detriment of 
all workers, by 4.0, 8.4 and 3.2 percentage points, 
respectively.


This increasing inequality reflected various forces. 
One important factor has been the increased bargain-
ing power of corporations,  in part due  to growing 


market  concentration  under  hyperglobalization, 
and  the gradual dilution of  their  social  and politi-
cal accountability to national constituencies and
labour in both developed and developing countries 
(Quentin and Campling, 2018; Bivens et al., 2018). 
The ability of TNCs to offshore plants and related
low- and medium-skilled jobs (or simply to threaten 
to do so) and to shift their intangible assets almost 
at will decisively weakened the bargaining power of 
organized labour and public authorities. This further 
biased the distribution of productivity gains in favour 
of private capital owners. This polarizing dynamic 
unfolded most visibly in manufacturing GVCs, but 
it also affected jobs and working conditions in many 
service  activities  segmented  into  internationally 
traded tasks.15 Another factor was the greater weight 
of finance in TNCs operations, which went hand in 
hand with greater emphasis on corporate strategies 
for maximizing  shareholder  value,  repaying  loans 
or embarking on share buy-back programmes (TDR
2017).


In developing countries, the negative impact of inter-
national trade on inequality was partly the result of
the proliferation of special processing trade regimes 
and EPZs.16 Many countries created regimes favour-
ing  exporters, with  the  objective  of  attracting  or 
preserving investment, production and jobs on their 
shores.17 The associated risk, however, is that such 
regimes merely subsidize labour-intensive assembly 
work or, more precisely, subsidize the organization 
of low-cost and low-productivity assembly work by 
large exporters or foreign TNCs in control of GVCs. 
Evidence accumulating in recent years, particularly 
from  experiences  in China,  points  to  the  limited 
benefits  of  such policies  for  the broader  economy 
and  their  negative  effects  on  income distribution. 
Interestingly, the export processing firms in China that 
expanded after 2001 were mostly foreign-owned,18
and  typically  characterized  by  lower  productivity, 
lower profitability,  lower wages,  lower capital and 
skills intensity and lower research and development 
expenditure, compared to non-processing exporters 
and non-exporters (Lu et al., 2010; Lu, 2010; Dai et 
al., 2016).19 This meant that, while China could count 
on foreign TNCs to integrate its economy into GVCs, 
it  could  not  rely  on  them  to  significantly  upgrade 
the skills and the pay of its workforce or bolster its 
productive capacities.


The mixed outcomes of policies to promote pro-
cessing trade often reflect the strategies of TNCs to 
capture value in GVCs that are designed on their own 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


53


terms, with high-value added  inputs and protected 
intellectual property content  sold at high prices  to 
processing  exporters, with  the  actual  production 
(fabrication) in developing countries accounting for 
only  a  tiny  fraction of  the value of  exported final 
goods  (e.g. Dedrick  et  al.,  2010; Ali-Yrkkö et  al., 
2011; WIPO, 2017). This is consistent with evidence 
of the lower productivity of processing exporters in 
China as well as the decline in value added accruing 
to low- and medium-skilled workers at the fabrication 
stage in manufacturing GVCs, as shown in table 2.2.20


The ongoing success of China at bolstering its pro-
ductive capacities – thus slowly breaking out of the 
trap of processing trade and moving up the value lad-
der – has crucially relied on its capacity to claim and 
use policy space to actively leverage trade through 
targeted industrial and other policies aiming at rais-
ing domestic value added in manufacturing exports 
(Poon, 2014, 2018). It has also relied on the ability 
of the Chinese authorities to develop independent
financing mechanisms and acquire control over for-
eign assets, which are being perceived by developed 
countries as a threat to their own business interests
(e.g. USTR, 2018).


The many  specificities  of China  (institutional  set-
ting, size, diaspora, etc.) suggest that there is limited 
scope for imitating its development strategy by other 
differently placed developing countries. This raises 
questions  about  the  benefits  for workers  in  other 
Southern economies that have made strong bets on 
the spillovers expected from processing trade, such 
as Malaysia and Viet Nam in South-East Asia, but 
also Mexico and Kenya in other developing regions, 
where processing trade can represent up to more than 
80 per cent of gross exports. Unless these countries 
manage to capture part of the surplus created by these 
GVCs and  reinvest  it  in productive capacities and 
infrastructure, immediate gains in output and employ-
ment are unlikely to translate into a dynamic move 
up the development ladder (Meagher et al., 2016).


2. Concentration in export markets,
intangible barriers to competition and
corporate rents: A look at the top 2,000
TNCs


To  an  even  larger  extent  than  domestic markets, 
global  exports  today  are  dominated by very  large 
companies, most of them TNCs.21 Large firms have 
become the most relevant actors in international


trade, although their dominance is hard to quantify 
precisely, because of data limitations and obstacles to 
combining country-level trade data with transnational 
firm-level data (see box 2.1).


Nevertheless,  recent  evidence  from  aggregated 
firm-level data on goods exports (excluding the oil 
sector,  as well  as  services)  shows  that, within  the 
very restricted circle of exporting firms, the top 1 per 
cent accounted for 57 per cent of country exports on 
average in 2014 (figure 2.10.A). Moreover, while the 
share of the top 5 per cent exceeded 80 per cent of 
country export revenues on average, the top 25 per 
cent accounted for virtually all country exports. The 
distribution of exports is thus highly skewed in favour 
of  the  largest  firms,  especially  in G20  emerging 
economies and in developed countries. It is evident 
to a lesser extent in developing economies, though 
even in this group such concentration has been rising 
rapidly (figure 2.10.B, C and D).


The concentration is even more extreme at the
top of  the  distribution.  Freund  and Pierola  (2015) 
found that the 5 largest exporting firms account, on 


FIGURE 2.10 Average shares of top 1 per cent,
5 per cent and 25 per cent exporters
in country total export, 1997–2014


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on the Exporter
Dynamics Database described in Fernandes et al., 2016.


a The Exporter Dynamics Database contains only Brazil, Germany,
Mexico, Turkey and South Africa of the G20 countries.


30


40


50


60


70


80


90


100


1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012


A. All countries


2014
30


40


50


60


70


80


90


100
B. G20a


30


40


50


60


70


80


90


100
C. Developed countries


Top 1 per cent Top 5 per cent Top 25 per cent


30


40


50


60


70


80


90


100
D. Developing countries


1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2014


1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2014 1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2014




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


54


average, for 30 per cent of a country’s total exports. 
In 2012, the 10 largest exporting firms in each country 
accounted, on average, for 42 per cent of a country’s 
total exports.22 In the few G20 economies represented 
in  the  sample,  the 10  largest firms  (out  of  tens or 
hundreds of thousands of exporting firms)23 provided
28 per cent of total exports (excluding oil) in Brazil, 
23 per cent in Germany, 23 per cent in Mexico, 15 per 
cent in Turkey and 34 per cent in South Africa.


Not surprisingly, new entrants and relatively smaller 
exporters tend to have low survival rates: on aver-
age, 73 per cent of firms stopped exporting only two 
years  after having  started, with  exporting firms  in 


developing countries faring slightly worse than those 
in  developed  countries  (figure  2.11).24  If  all  firms 
(large and small) were competing on a level playing 
field, the low survival rate among new exporting firms 
could be interpreted as a sign of strong competition, 
likely to be associated with low firm profitability and 
high consumer surplus. But the significantly higher 
profitability of the largest firms that dominate export 
markets casts doubt on such an interpretation. This 
is more  likely  to be a  fallout of  the “winner  takes 
most” syndrome that partly results from the market 
structures  and  institutional  and  regulatory  condi-
tions that have nurtured new monopolistic practices
and enabled TNCs to capture a growing share of the 
economic surplus (TDR 2017: chap. VI).25 This obvi-
ously tends to further polarize income distribution.


The dominance of a small number of TNCs over
trade was acknowledged long ago (e.g. Kindleberger, 
1969, 1970), but took on a new significance as the 
legal framework and meaning of “trade” deepened 
after  the 1990s (box 2.2). While mainstream trade 
theory did seek  to  integrate  the presence of TNCs 
(e.g. Markusen,  1984; Markusen  and Venables, 
1998),  their  dominance  in  international  trade was 
only incorporated into the set of core trade model-
ling assumptions much later, and that too under the 
neutral label of “heterogeneous” firms (Melitz, 2003). 
Similarly, the existence of monopolistic rents in inter-
national trade have been taken note of in mainstream 
theory, but the additional step of acknowledging the 
wider implications was rarely taken. As discussed in 
section E, these implications include both the polar-
izing effects of trade on income distribution resulting 
from concentration and monopolistic behaviour of
large firms, as well as plausible negative macrofinan-
cial externalities that harm the potential for inclusive
development. This  is because corporate  rents  (and 
thus higher profits) also arise out of strategies aimed 
at instrumentalizing other actors, by lobbying poli-
cymakers, buying out competitors, sharing markets, 
collusion, blocking new entrants, etc.26


Paradoxically,  even  as  tangible  barriers  to  trade 
imposed by governments, such as tariffs and quotas, 
have  been  declining over  the  last  30  years  or  so, 
intangible  barriers  to  competition  rooted  in  “free 
trade” treaties and erected by large firms themselves 
have surged, as they exploit the increased legal pro-
tection of  intellectual property and the broadening 
scope  for  intangible  intra-firm  trade. According  to 
some estimates, intangible assets may represent up 
to two thirds of the value of large firms (Menell and 


FIGURE 2.11 Export market entrant survival rate
in 2010
(Percentage)


Source: Exporter Dynamics Database described in Fernandes et al., 2016.
Note: Data after two years are missing for Estonia, Nicaragua, Slovenia,


Romania and Zambia.


0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80


Spain
Portugal
Norway
Estonia
Belgium
Croatia


Slovenia
Romania
Denmark
Germany


Malawi
Rwanda
Guinea
Zambia


Costa Rica
United Republic of Tanzania


Uruguay
Côte d'Ivoire


Botswana
Senegal


Jordan
Lebanon


Yemen
Dominican Republic


Georgia
Chile


Guatemala
Morocco


Kyrgyzstan
Mauritius
Colombia


Nicaragua
Madagascar


Ecuador
Burkina Faso


Egypt
Bolivia (Plurinational State of)


Brazil
Albania


Peru
South Africa


Ethiopia
Paraguay


Turkey
Bangladesh
Timor-Leste


D
ev


el
op


ed
c


ou
nt


rie
s


D
ev


el
op


in
g


co
un


tr
ie


s


After one year
After two years




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


55


Scotchmer, 2007). This is obviously so for firms that 
are often positively coined as “knowledge-intensive”, 
such as the digital firms considered in chapter III. Yet, 
knowledge can be valuable in diverse settings and 
for a variety of reasons: for its scarcity (e.g. a patent 
protecting a technological innovation) or precisely 
because it is widely shared and engrained in the minds 
of consumers (e.g. brand recognition). As the World 
Trade Organization (WTO, 2012) notes, “many prod-
ucts that used to be traded as low-technology goods 
or commodities now contain a higher proportion of 
invention and design in their value”, that is, protected 
intellectual property content.  In  short, knowledge-
intensive intangible assets are valuable because they 
ensure a certain degree of market power, not because 
they represent an inherent and benevolent force for
innovation and technological progress.


Returns  to  knowledge-intensive  intangible  assets 
proxied by charges for the use of foreign IPR rose 
almost unabated throughout the GFC and its after-
math,  even  as  returns  to  tangible  assets  declined. 
At the global level, charges (i.e. payments) for the 
use of foreign IPR rose from less  than $50 billion 
in  1995  to  $367 billion  in  2015  (figure  2.12.A).27
To the extent that charges for the use of foreign IPR 
reflect transactions taking place between unaffiliated 
firms, they genuinely indicate their market or “arm’s 
length” value and the cost charged to final consum-
ers. Yet, a growing share of these charges represent 
payments and receipts between affiliates of the same 
group, often merely intended to shift profit to low-tax 
jurisdictions.28 Recent leaks from fiscal authorities, 


banks, audit and consulting or legal firms’ records, 
revealing corporate tax-avoidance scandals involv-
ing large TNCs, have made clear why major offshore 
financial centres (such as Ireland, Luxembourg, the 
Netherlands, Singapore or Switzerland) that account 
for a tiny fraction of global production, have become 
major  players  in  terms  of  the  use  of  foreign  IPR 
(figure 2.12.A).


IPR charges are merely one of  the many forms of 
more widespread profit  shifting within  companies 
or groups, that weigh negatively on public finances 
and collective wage bargaining in many countries.29
Indeed,  the  largest  recipient  country  (the United 
States) is simultaneously the victim of the most mas-
sive IPR-related corporate tax avoidance by TNCs 
“trading” intangibles.30 Far from promoting innova-
tion  or  competition,  such  schemes  illustrate  how 
corporate cost-saving strategies (especially in relation 
to wages and taxes) rely on international arbitrage 
and free-riding; and while they may be successful for 
creating monopolistic rents and crushing competition 
effectively they do so at the cost of public welfare
(TDR 2017: chap. VI; Diez et al., 2018).


The  rise  of  intangible  barriers  that  further  distort 
competition, increase corporate leverage and foster 
monopolistic rents has been partly supported by
changes  to  domestic  laws  in many  countries. But 
international treaties may have been even more
significant, such as double non-taxation agreements 
and new generation  trade  agreements  that  include 
provisions  strengthening  the  protection  of  IPR, 


FIGURE 2.12 Payments and receipts related to the use of foreign IPR, selected country groups, 1995–2015


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on World Bank, World Development Indicators.


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


350


400


0


20


40


60


80


100


1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


$
bi


lli
on


P
er


ce
nt


ag
e


A. Payments


Other developing countries
Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Singapore and Switzerland
Other developed countries
Total value (right scale)


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


350


400


0


20


40


60


80


100


1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


$
bi


lli
on


P
er


ce
nt


ag
e


B. Receipts




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


56


foreign investment, etc. Moreover, unlike domestic 
rule-making  in  a  democracy,  international  treaty 
negotiations  tend  to be much more  secretive, pro-
viding more room for detrimental lobbying by large 
rent-seeking firms (Rodrik, 2018).


This is probably why very large firms, which account 
for the bulk of international trade, have experienced 
rising rents under hyperglobalization, leading to ris-
ing profits. This is confirmed by empirical analysis of 
the largest 2,000 TNCs.31 While these firms represent 
a  limited subset of  the  top 1 per cent of exporters 
discussed above, they cover listed firms involved in 
the oil and services trade, including financial servic-
es.32 However, it is not possible from this database to 
distinguish firms’ cross-border activities from their 
domestic  activities,  so  the  results  described  here 
relate  to  the  aggregate  size  and  activities  of  these 
top 2,000 firms.


In this context, it is no surprise that total revenues 
from top TNCs have been greater than world trade 
throughout  the  period 1995  to  2015  (figure  2.13). 
Yet,  to  the  extent  that  the  revenues  of  top TNCs 
have moved very much in tandem with global trade 
because they are responsible for the bulk of it, some 
selected indicators can reveal both the extent of
concentration and the rents (here proxied by profits) 
captured by TNCs, including through cross-border 
trade.


The annual profits33 of  these  top 2,000 companies 
rose from $0.7 trillion in the late 1990s to $2.6 trillion 
in recent years (table 2.3).34 While profits grew on 
average by 8.5 per cent per year, the average annual 
growth rate of revenue was only 6.8 per cent. This 
disparity led the profit to revenue ratio to increase 
from 5.7 per cent in the late 1990s to 7.0 per cent in 
recent years, a 23 per cent  increase. The five-year 
averages shown in table 2.3 smooth out profit volatil-
ity, but between 1996 and 2015 this ratio rose even 
more dramatically, by 58 per cent.


FIGURE 2.13 Top 2,000 TNCs revenues and
world trade, 1995–2015
(Trillions of current dollars)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on UNCTADstat and
UNCTAD database of consolidated financial statements, based
on Thomson Reuters Worldscope.


Note: The logarithmic scale on the vertical axis is used to show the
similar trajectories of the two variables.


1


10


100


1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


World trade


TNC revenues


TABLE 2.3  Top 2,000 TNCs – key indicators, 
1996–2015
(Trillions of dollars)


1996–
2000


2001–
2005


2006–
2010


2011–
2015


Net sales or revenues 12.8 18.7 29.7 36.8
Net income or profits 0.7 1.0 2.0 2.6
Ratio of profit to revenue 5.7% 5.4% 6.8% 7.0%


Source: UNCTAD database of consolidated financial statements, based
on Thomson Reuters Worldscope.


Note: Data relate to annual averages.


There were many sources of this rising profitability. 
Besides  the  growing market  power  noted  above, 
deepening financialization certainly played a central 
role (see TDR 2017: chap. V). TNCs strengthened 
their  ability  to  operate  on  a  global  scale  through 
debt-financed mergers and acquisitions that expanded 
their control over potential competitors.35 The greater 
weight of finance in their operations went hand in 
hand with greater emphasis on corporate strategies 
for maximizing shareholder value, including through 
share buy-back programmes.36 Furthermore, as docu-
mented by Baud  and Durand  (2012)  for  the  retail 
sector, a growing number of non-financial TNCs have 
relied on financial operations to generate profits,37 and
even in the supposedly most innovative and booming 
sectors, such as digital technologies, tech giants are 
exploiting financial activities to boost their profit (e.g. 
Platt et al., 2017).


This increase in profits of large firms has been a major 
driver of global functional inequality, associated with 
declines  in  the global  labour  income  share during 
the last two decades. Market concentration increases 
as  industries  become progressively  dominated  by 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


57


“superstar” firms with high profits and low shares of 
labour in firm value added, and as the importance of 
superstar firms increases, the aggregate labour share 
tends to fall (Autor et al., 2017a). For example, in the 
United States and several other developed countries, 
industry  sales  became  increasingly  concentrated 
in a small number of firms; more  intense  industry 
concentration was associated with larger declines in 
industry labour income shares; and so the fall in the
labour share was mostly driven by such declines in
large firms (Autor et al., 2017b).


Obviously,  a decline  in  the  labour  share necessar-
ily involves a rise in the capital income share. But 
since measured value  added  accruing  to  capital  is 
not net of depreciation, a rise in the capital income 
share can be caused by two different processes: by a
rise in the cost of capital, which may be compatible 
with declining and even zero profit; or by a rise in 
corporate profit. Barkai (2016) found that the cost of 
capital in the United States declined even more rap-
idly than labour income between 1984 and 2014, as 
the share of corporate profits in value added increased 
by 12 points.


Kohler and Cripps (2018) showed that globally, the 
rising share of capital income since 1995 was driven 
by  the  accelerated  expansion of  the  profits  of  top 


TNCs. While the share of capital income other than 
profits accruing to the top TNCs increased slightly 
under hyperglobalization (red area in figure 2.14.A), 
the  rapid growth of  the profits of  top TNCs  (pink 
areas) was the major force pushing down the global 
labour income share (blue area). This dropped from 
56.1 per cent in 1995 to 52.8 per cent in 2007, before 
rising slightly in the aftermath of the GFC to reach 
53.6 per cent in 2015. As a result, the rise in the profits 
of top TNCs accounted for more than two thirds of
the decline in the global labour income share between 
1995 and 2015. Therefore, although the rising share 
of the profits of top TNCs has come at the expense 
of smaller enterprises, it has also been strongly cor-
related with the declining labour income share since 
the beginning of the new millennium (figure 2.14.B). 
This points to the key role of the largest 2,000 TNCs 
dominating international “trade” and finance in driv-
ing up global functional income inequality.


In  sum,  the  evidence  in  this  section  describes  a 
widening gap between a small number of big win-
ners in GVCs and a large collection of participants, 
both smaller companies and workers, who are being 
squeezed. Rising  export market  concentration  and 
intangible barriers to competition, both of which have 
increased the rents of top TNCs (the largest players 
in international trade and finance) have exacerbated 


FIGURE 2.14 Top 2,000 TNCs profit and the global labour income share, 1995–2015
(Percentage of world gross product)


Source: UNCTAD database of consolidated financial statements, based on Thomson Reuters Worldscope and UNCTAD internal World Economic
Database.


Note: In panel A, all three areas coloured red or pink add up to the share of capital income. Pink areas represent the net income or profit of
top 2,000 TNCs (both financial and non-financial, measured in corporate accounts) as a share of global GDP (measured in national accounts).
As an approximation, they were subtracted from the share of capital income (measured in national accounts only) even though methodologies
differ in several regards across both sets of accounts.


50


52


54


56


58


60


62


64


1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


A. Global functional income distribution around the split


Capital income excluding top 2,000 TNCs net income
Non-financial top 2,000 TNCs net income
Financial top 2,000 TNCs net income
Labour income


-4


-3


-2


-1


0


1


2


3


4


1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


B. Change compared to 1995


1995 benchmark


Top 2,000 TNCs net income
Labour income


Capital income excluding top 2,000 TNCs net income




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


58


BOX 2.3  “There’s no place like home”: The geographical location of headquarters of the top TNCs


This chapter shows how the “rise of the South” other than China has been moderate at best. As noted in section B, 
the share of the South in global trade in 2011 was nearly 48 per cent in gross value terms and 44 per cent in 
value added terms; but excluding extractive industries, first-generation NIEs and China, the share was less than 
23 per cent. This means that the claims of a “Great Convergence” (Baldwin, 2016) are still far-fetched. However, 
the picture of international inequality is even more dire in terms of the locations of the headquarters of TNCs.


Obviously, the geographical networks of TNCs activities and ownership structures are much more complex 
than can be deduced from a simple mapping of TNC headquarters. Nevertheless, the geographical location 
of  the headquarters remains a key criterion for establishing from where effective control over a corporate 
entity is exerted. Unsurprisingly, the vast majority of top TNCs remain headquartered in developed countries. 
Accordingly,  the  distribution  of  the  returns  to  transnational  capital  is much more  skewed  in  favour  of 
investors  resident  in  developed  countries  than  the  distribution of  (exported)  value  added more  generally 
(Quentin and Campling, 2018). In short, if trade is nurturing growing concentration and corporate rents, these 
disproportionately benefit Northern  investors. Through  its  impact on corporate  rents, “trade”  thus adds  to 
international and functional inequality.


Reflecting the rise of China in global trade and finance, 
the number of Chinese top TNCs increased rapidly over
the past two decades from zero to about 200. Although 
they are taking a growing share the profits of top TNCs 
(17 per cent in 2015), their expansion does not seem to 
threaten top TNCs headquartered in the United States
(Starrs, 2014), which still account for 37 per cent of the 
profits of top TNCs, almost as much as in 1995 (figure 
2.B3.1).  Interestingly  however,  the  share  of Chinese 
financial TNCs in top TNCs profit expanded rapidly to 
more than 10 per cent to total top TNCs profits, exceeding 
those of United States financial top TNCs in 2015. Much 
like the top United States TNCs, those headquartered in 
NIEs seem to hold their ground as  their big neighbour 
is rising. In relative terms, the expansion of Chinese top 
TNCs thus seems to have come about at the expense of
other developed countries’ TNCs, which could explain 
some of the ramped-up rhetoric in the incipient trade wars.


TNCs  headquartered  in  other  developing  countries 
accounted for less than 10 per cent of top TNCs profits in 
2015, much the same share as it was before the decade-
long commodity boom. (Even within this,  it should be 
borne in mind that an unknown fraction of the small profit 
share accruing to top Southern TNCs actually accrued to 


Northern investors owning shares in these companies.) Thus, the stake of the “Rest of the South” in the control 
over top TNCs, including global production decisions and transnational capital income, remains negligible. 
Their marginality is all the more striking given the important and growing demography of the “Rest of the 
South” (68.2 per cent of world population in 2015). 


FIGURE 2.B3.1  Shares in top 2,000 TNCs profits, 
selected countries and country
groups, 1995–2015


Source: UNCTAD database of consolidated financial statements,
based on Thomson Reuters Worldscope.


Note: See note to table 2.3.


0.0


0.5


1.0


1.5


2.0


2.5


3.0


0


20


40


60


80


100


1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


Tr
ill


io
ns


o
f c


ur
re


nt
d


ol
la


rs


P
er


ce
nt


ag
e


Other developing countries and
economies in transition
China
First-tier NIEs
Developed countries
Total value (right scale)


other  impacts of  trade on  inequality. Furthermore, 
as large TNCs have increased their weight in rule-
making  at  all  levels,  they  have  become  ever  less 
accountable  from  a  social  perspective  (see  e.g. 
Carroll, 2012; Carroll and Sapinski, 2016; Zingales, 
2017)  as well  as with  respect  to  environmental 
concerns.38 This is one of the main reasons why
trade liberalization under hyperglobalization did not 


deliver the promised shared prosperity in the North
or the South. Rather, it promoted debt-fuelled market 
concentration dominated by a relatively small number
of  top TNCs,  deepened  the financialization of  the 
global economy and vastly increased the influence 
of transnational capital over national and interna-
tional policy decisions that affect global production, 
employment  and  income distribution. Much  as  in 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


59


Prebisch’s time, albeit for different types of activities, 
the dynamics (and the rules) of  international  trade 
still reflect the imbalances between, on the one hand, 
powerful exporting firms with monopolistic control 
whose rents are concentrated in the developed coun-
tries (see box 2.3) and, on the other hand, “peripheral” 
firms (and their employees), in both developed and 


developing countries,  involved in providing goods 
and services with low barriers to entry. This kind of 
polarization compounds the more classical Prebisch-
type  outcome  described  in  section C, which was 
related to the ways in which trade still contributes to
the persistence of specialization in primary products 
in many developing regions.


The belief that international trade can be an “engine 
for  development”  and  help  establish  an  inclusive 
growth path, as recently affirmed in the 2030 Agenda 
for  Sustainable Development,  is  neither  new nor 
unreasonable. Yet, these objectives should not lead 
to simplistic advocacy of untrammelled free trade. 
When UNCTAD was convened for the first time in 
1964, policymakers from the South were concerned 
that  their  countries were  increasingly  being mar-
ginalized  by  an  international  trading  system  that 
added to polarizing pressures in the global economy 
(UNCTAD, 1964). This was not seen as the ineluc-
table consequence of market or technological forces 
but  the outcome of  institutions, policies and rules, 
at  the  national  and  global  levels,  that  always  and 
everywhere animate and channel these forces in
both creative and destructive directions, and could 
be  changed  if  the  balance was  seen  as  unfair  and 
undesirable. More  than  half  a  century  later,  and 
despite myriad changes in the volume, direction and 
governance of cross-border trade, such concerns have 
surfaced once again, in advanced economies as well 
as in developing economies.


It  is  evident  that  increased  trade  under  hyperglo-
balization  has  created  opportunities  for  structural 
change, but only in very limited parts of the Global 
South. Besides the first-tier NIEs and more recently 
China, only a few countries have managed to lever-
age trade as a means for mobilizing and reallocating 
productive factors away from primary commodi-
ties towards higher value added manufacturing and 
service activities, and even then in a sporadic man-
ner. As global trade has decelerated since the GFC, 
underlying structural weaknesses have been revealed 
in many  countries.  In many  cases,  the  growth 
spurts that occurred were on the back of unsustain-
able booms  in  extractive  industries, which  in  turn 


further  entrenched patterns of hyperspecialization, 
when what was needed was to move towards more
diversified  structures.  In developing countries  that 
did increase manufactured exports via the offshor-
ing of production, the underlying shift in corporate 
strategy to minimize costs and maximize the capture 
of rents has, in combination with the indiscriminate 
application  of  neoliberal  policies,  exacerbated  the 
unequalizing impact of trade.


These outcomes pose several macroeconomic risks 
and development challenges, which are starkly evi-
dent today. The main concern is probably the negative 
impact that trade under hyperglobalization has had on 
aggregate demand (TDR 2016). As capital progres-
sively acquired a larger share of world income at the 
expense of labour, within-country wage, income and 
wealth inequality rose in most countries in a self-
reinforcing manner. Many economists have noted that 
rising inequality together with the higher propensity 
to save of the rich creates a bias towards undercon-
sumption or, alternatively, has encouraged debt-led 
consumption enabled by financial deregulation; both 
of these processes tend to end badly. Before the GFC, 
this pattern, as discussed in previous Reports, was 
reflected in, and compounded by, global imbalances 
that were prolonged by premature external opening.


Global  financial markets  and major  transnational 
financial  institutions have, with some justification, 
become the principal villains in this story but it is now
evident that non-financial corporations cannot remain 
immune from criticism. Facing weaker prospective 
sales  in  a  context  of weak  aggregate  demand  and 
compounded by the post-crisis turn to austerity, large 
corporations  have  cut  back on  investment,  further 
depressing  aggregate  demand  and  contributing  to 
slower trade in recent years. The expansion of ICT 


E. Unequalizing trade: Macroeconomic risks and 
development policy challenges




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


60


and digital companies (discussed in chapter III) has 
not changed this trend; if anything it has, by introduc-
ing newer kinds of market control and rent-seeking 
behaviour, made the situation worse.


In  such  an  environment,  incentives  are  strong  for 
seeking  to boost profitability  through means other 
than raising productivity, such as intensifying inter-
national competition between workers and between 
governments to reduce labour and tax costs, crush-
ing  or  buying  up  competitors  to  build  up market 
dominance  and  increase markups,  etc. The unfor-
tunate truth is that the attempts of individual TNCs
to enhance their own market position through such 
strategies only makes the broader economic system 
more fragile and vulnerable, since together they lead 
to more  inequality,  underconsumption,  debt  and, 
consequently, macroeconomic vulnerability.


In an interdependent world characterized by financial 
instability and low growth, trade risks becoming a 
zero-sum game. Unilateral actions by governments 
to reinvigorate their own economy by trade protec-
tionism, currency depreciation or wage restraint risk 
increasing  tensions  between  countries  and  ending 
in a  self-defeating spiral. But  simple-minded calls 
for more  trade  liberalization  are  no  substitute  for 
development  strategies  either  (e.g. TDR 2016).  It 
is  true  that  trade  has  been  successfully  leveraged 
for promoting structural change by some countries, 
most  recently China. But without policy  interven-
tions to generate structural change, channel profits 
into  productive  investment  and  bring  better  qual-
ity employment, trade can nurture more economic, 
social and environmental damage, at odds with the 
Sustainable Development Goals.


While “best practice” is a poor guide for develop-
ment policy (World Bank, 2017), the experiences of 
successful industrializers should be used as a source 
of policy experimentation for other developing coun-
tries  to  develop  their  own  strategy based on  their 
national specificities. In such context, governments 
should realize that relying on so-called “second-best” 
approaches is often preferable for their economies
and populations (Chang, 2003).


The various pieces of evidence examined in this
chapter call for a more evidence-based and pragmatic 
approach  to managing  trade  as well  as  to  design-
ing  trade  agreements. Crucially,  it  is  important  to 
address trade with a narrative that departs from
unrealistic  assumptions,  such  as  full  employment, 


perfect competition, savings-determined investment 
or  constant  income  distribution, which  underpin 
mainstream computable  general  equilibrium  trade 
models and the associated policy discourse on trade
policy. Instead, the insights of new trade theory that 
acknowledge the impact of trade on inequality need to 
be combined with an assessment of the causal relation-
ship between rising inequality, corporate rent-seeking, 
falling investment and mounting indebtedness.


As  the  benefits  of  hyperglobalization  are  increas-
ingly concentrated, the mood of populations in many 
countries is changing and new narratives are needed. 
As UNCTAD has argued consistently in the past few 
years (TDRs 2011, 2014, 2017), a new international 
compact is required – a Global New Deal – that would 
aim for international economic integration in more 
democratic, equitable and sustainable forms.


There  are  several  elements of  such a Global New 
Deal that have already been elaborated in previous 
Reports. Specifically, with reference to strategies for 
international trade and the architecture that sustains it, 
there is a strong case for revisiting the Havana Charter 
1948,39 which  emerged,  albeit  ephemerally,  from 
the original New Deal and still provides important 
insights for our contemporary concerns. First of all, 
the Charter (chap. II, art. 2.1) looked to nestle trade in 
the appropriate macroeconomic setting, noting that:


the avoidance of unemployment or underemploy-
ment, through the achievement and maintenance 
in each country of useful employment opportuni-
ties for those able and willing to work and of a 
large and steadily growing volume of production 
and  effective  demand  for  goods  and  services, 
is not of domestic  concern alone, but  is  also a 
necessary condition for the achievement of the
general  purpose …  including  the  expansion of 
international  trade,  and  thus  for  the well-being 
of all other countries.


This focus on employment has largely been lost in 
the period of hyperglobalization, and also finds little 
reflection in the “trade” and “economic cooperation” 
agreements that have dominated the landscape. Yet it 
must be revived if the widespread backlash against 
trade is not to gather more strength.


Second,  the Charter  recognized  the  links  between 
labour-market  conditions,  inequality  and  trade, 
calling  for  improvements  in wages  and working 
conditions  in  line with  productivity  changes.  It 
also sought to prevent “business practices affecting 
international trade which restrain competition, limit 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


61


access  to markets  or  foster monopolistic  control” 
(chap. V, art. 46.1) and dedicated an entire chapter 
to dealing with the problem of restrictive business 
practices. Revisiting these goals in light of twenty-
first-century challenges should be a priority.


Third,  the Charter  insisted  that  there were multi-
ple  development  paths  to marry  local  goals with 


integration into the global economy and that countries 
must have sufficient policy space to pursue pragmatic 
experimentation  to ensure a harmonious marriage. 
This need for policy space also brings to the forefront 
the matter of negotiating trade agreements that have 
in  recent  decades  privileged  the  requirements  of 
capital and limited the possibilities for development
in line with social priorities.


1  In  this  context, Rodrik,  2018:  74,  commented on 
the unanimous consensus among 38 polled econo-
mists  that North American Free Trade Agreement 
(NAFTA) had on average made citizens of the United 
States better off as follows:


The economists must have been aware that trade
agreements,  like  free  trade  itself,  create winners 
and losers. But how did they weight the gains and 
losses to reach a judgement that US citizens would 
be better off “on average”? Did it not matter who 
gained and lost, whether they were rich or poor to 
begin with, or whether the gains and losses would be 
diffuse or concentrated? What if the likely redistri-
bution was large compared to the efficiency gains? 
What did they assume about the likely compensation 
for the losers, or did it not matter at all? And would 
their evaluation be any different if they knew that 
recent research suggests NAFTA produced minute 
net efficiency gains for the United States economy 
while  severely depressing wages of  those groups 
and communities most directly affected by Mexican 
competition?


2 For presenting compelling stylized facts doing justice 
to  the complexity of  the  task at hand,  this chapter 
exploits several databases. All of them suffer from 
limitations. Yet they shed light on distinct aspects of 
this global puzzle. In addition to gross merchandise 
trade from United Nations Comtrade (https://com-
trade.un.org/), which proposes the broadest coverage 
in terms of time scale and number of countries, but 
excludes services and suffers from double counting, 
sections B and C also use data from the joint OECD–
WTO Trade in Value-Added (TiVA) initiative (http://
www.oecd.org/sti/ind/measuring-trade-in-value-add-
ed.htm). TiVA addresses double counting issues and 
includes  trade  in  services,  though without  fixing 
deeper-running methodological  issues  (box  2.1). 
Unlike section B, which uses value added data from 
TiVA to map production and trade, section D.1 relies 
on value added data from the World Input–Output 
Database  (WIOD)  (http://www.wiod.org)  to map 
trade  and  income  distribution  in manufacturing 
GVCs (de Vries, 2018; de Vries et al., 2018). More 
precisely, it examines whether trade is associated with 


a deepening “smile curve” and polarizing distribu-
tional effects across production factors and business
functions, thus hurting lower-skilled workers. Then, 
section D.2 uses firm-level data from the Exporter 
Dynamic Database (Fernandes et al., 2016) (https://
datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/exporter-dynam-
ics-database) on exports from 70 countries, mostly 
developing countries, to assess the trend of market 
concentration  in  goods  exports. The  analysis  of 
market concentration is complemented by UNCTAD 
data on the consolidated financial statements of the 
top 2,000 largest TNCs, based on Thomson Reuters 
Worldscope, which provide a more global perspective 
and further account for the growing role of services, 
especially financial  services,  in  global  production 
and trade. Data on charges for IPR is also exploited 
to highlight growing returns to intangible assets and 
the  pervasive  challenge  of  profit  shifting, which 
biases  the  level  playing field,  bolstering  rents  and 
market concentration. As nation-based mappings of 
trade in times of rising cross-border ownership and 
(intra-firm) trade in intangible services are subject to 
growing distortions (box 2.1), box 2.3 again exploits 
Thomson Reuters EIKON data  (https://customers.
thomsonreuters.com/eikon/) to pin down the head-
quarter location of top TNCs as an imperfect proxy for
the nationality of owners of transnational capital, and 
stresses how elusive the “rise of the South” remains in 
terms of its control over transnational capital. Finally, 
data from the Global Policy Model’s World Database 
(https://www.un.org/development/desa/dpad/publica-
tion/united-nations-global-policy-model/) is crossed 
with the profits of top TNCs to illustrate the role of 
top TNCs in driving down the global labour income 
share, in accordance with the most recent academic 
research  findings  conducted  at  the  country-level 
(Barkai, 2016; Autor et al., 2017a, 2017b).


3 The decline was similar even in terms of value-added
trade.


4  TiVA  data  show  that  the  share  of manufactures 
exports in total trade has remained roughly constant 
at about 50 per cent between 1995 and 2011  (the 
latest year, for which TiVA provides data).


Notes




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


62


5  Considering the EU-27 as one single entity and its 
trade with the rest of the world (extra-European
Union trade in goods), the export revenues in dol-
lars from China overtook the ones from the EU-27 
in 2014.


6  Brazil,  the Russian Federation,  India, China  and 
South Africa.


7  The Russian Federation,  India, Brazil  and South 
Africa.


8  Or put it differently, East Asia’s exports of manufac-
tures to the world accounted for about 63 per cent 
of total developing-country exports of manufactures 
to the world, while East Asia’s exports of manufac-
tures  to  the  developing  and  transition  economies 
accounted for 67 per cent of total developing-country 
exports of manufactures to developing countries and 
transition economies.


9  These findings do not appear directly in table 2.1 but 
in its underlying data since in table 2.1 “agriculture” 
was merged with extractive industries into the same 
column, for presentation purposes.


10  This is confirmed by the analysis in chap. III.
11  Earlier UNCTAD research had already stressed that 


this type of analysis can be problematic as what could
appear as a success (i.e. exporting a larger share of 
more  sophisticated products) may not  represent  a 
truly  positive  structural  change. This  is  because 
for many goods  intensive  in  technology and high 
and medium skills it might well be that the export-
ing country is only engaged in assembly activities 
intensive in low-skilled labour within a GVC. Thus, 
the apparent technological “leapfrogging” that gross 
trade data can suggest might represent a statistical 
mirage  (TDR 2002:  77–81).  For  this  reason,  this 
approach should be interpreted as a rather optimistic
picture that might require further investigation. On 
the flip side, absent any progress (or even worse, a 
deterioration) using this biased approach suggests, 
at  best,  a  non-upgrading  situation  or  a  plausible 
degradation (downgrading).


12  The 2016 version of the WIOD database covers 43 
countries for 2014 and a model for the rest of the 
world for the period 2000–2014. Data for 56 sectors 
are classified according to the International Standard 
Industrial Classification revision 4.


13  The positive narrative on trade and GVCs does not 
only  rely  on  the  rather  old-fashioned Heckscher-
Ohlin model.  It  is  also  inspired  by more  recent 
developments of mainstream trade theory. Several 
shortcomings of (new) trade theory models are dis-
cussed in section D.2.


14 In  this  chapter,  headquarter  functions  comprises 
the following professions defined by de Vries et al., 
2018:  (1) Management:  general managers,  finan-
cial managers, human resources and other support 
functions; (2) Research and development: engineers 
and related professionals, computing professionals; 
(3) Marketing:  sales  persons,  client  information 


clerks, customer services representatives. See chap-
ter III and de Vries et al., 2018, for more details. This 
framework offers a preliminary attempt to track the 
distributional impact of GVCs.


15  Moreover,  irrespective  of GVCs,  the  polarizing 
impact  of  trade  has  long  been  particularly  acute 
for  extractive  industries  and  commodity  exports, 
because  of  their  higher  capital-intensity, which 
constrains the benefits in terms of employment
and  income  for  indigenous  people, who  still  are 
on numerous occasions dispossessed of their land
and livelihood. Gender segmentation also plays an 
important  role  in  the polarizing  role  of  trade,  see 
TDR 2017, chap. IV.


16  Processing trade regimes dispense firms located in 
EPZs  from any  import or  export duty,  submitting 
them  to much  lighter  regulations  and  sometimes 
even granting them tax rebates and other advantages; 
for a detailed discussion of EPZs and their record 
with respect to economic and social upgrading, see 
Milberg and Winkler, 2013: chap. 7.


17  As of 2006, the International Labour Organization 
(ILO) counted over 130 countries with laws provid-
ing for EPZs, compared to only 46 in 1986. During 
the  same period,  the  number  of EPZs worldwide 
increased  from 176  to  3,500,  harbouring  at  least 
66 million jobs (ILO, 2014). In the United States, 
over 300 “foreign trade zones” account for 13 per 
cent of manufacturing output (Grant, 2018) and in the 
European Union inward processing regimes account 
for  10  per  cent  of  total European Union  exports 
(Cernat and Pajot, 2012). In China, processing trade 
still accounts for nearly half of its exports, exceeding 
gross exports of most countries, except Germany and 
the United States (Lu, 2010; Dai et al., 2016; Kee 
and Tang, 2016).


18  Part of  those foreign firm may actually be owned 
by mainland Chinese investors, as part of inward-
flowing  foreign direct  investment  (FDI)  is  simply 
round tripping through Hong Kong (China).


19  Such observations challenge the popular claim that 
exporting firms  (irrespective  of  the  nationality  of 
their owners and despite evidence of pervasive
processing trade in many developing countries) are 
more competitive than non-exporting firms, because 
exporting firms are necessarily more productive (e.g. 
Melitz, 2003).


20  In  addition  to  earning wages  that  are  in  relative 
decline, low-skilled assembly employees are regu-
larly submitted to exploitative and sometimes even
hazardous working conditions, in China (e.g. China 
Labor Watch, 2012; Merchant, 2017) and elsewhere 
(e.g. Richardson et al., 2017).


21  Most firms are not involved in exports. For instance, 
in  the United States  only  1  per  cent  of firms  are 
involved in exports (Lederer, 2017). This share may 
be somewhat higher in small export-oriented econo-
mies, but given high export market concentration, the 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


63


number of exporting firms only represents a small 
fraction of the total number of domestic firms.


22  Additional data  related  to  the Exporter Dynamics 
Database provided by Fernandes et al., 2016.


23  In Germany, for instances, more than 110,000 firms 
are involved in exports.


24  Similar findings  appear  across  all  sectors  and  are 
not driven by extraordinary levels of concentration
or new export firm mortality in a particular industry.


25  At  a minimum,  available  evidence  challenges  the 
claim  that  international  trade  in  the  era  of GVCs 
offers growing opportunities for individual entrepre-
neurs, small and medium enterprises and the poor in 
developing countries.


26  The characteristics of corporate rent-seeking schemes 
can be  sector-specific. See Havice  and Campling, 
2017, and references therein.


27  Developing  countries  remain  net  payers  for  the 
use of foreign IPR, and they have so far failed  to 
increase  their  share  of  receipts, which  is  close  to 
zero (figure 2.12.B).


28  Five high-income offshore financial centres account-
ed for 42 per cent of global payments in 2015. Also, 
note that reported payments are higher than reported 
receipts. Moreover, the number of reporting coun-
tries peaked around the GFC, with a maximum of 
154 and 143 countries reporting foreign IPR-related 
payments and receipts, respectively, in 2008/2009. 
In  2015,  these  numbers  had  declined  to  148  and 
129,  respectively. About  one  third  of  the  low-tax 
jurisdictions classified as “non-cooperative” by the 
OECD in 2009 never reported these charges. Despite 
a decline in the number of reporting countries, IPR 
charges increased after the GFC.


29  The IPR regime in tandem with the “broken” interna-
tional tax regime (IMF, 2013) provide a legal cover 
for large TNCs to transfer their IPR to affiliates in 
jurisdictions with low tax rates or offering special 
tax deals. For instance, a TNC headquartered in the 
United States can license its IPR to an affiliate  in 
Ireland, thus maintaining its IPR under the stronger 
protection of the jurisdiction of the United States. 
The Irish affiliate will pay undervalued charges for 
this  licence, but  in exchange  it will cash  in much 
larger profits generated by those IPR and pay close 
to no taxes in Ireland. For a more detailed discussion 
of IPR-based profit shifting schemes and possible 
solutions, see Blair-Stanek, 2015. For a typology of 
the different forms of intellectual property trade and
value capture, see Fu, 2018: table 1.


30  According to a widely cited reference focusing on 
the United States (Grubert, 2003), IPR profit shifting 
schemes may be  the most  effective ones,  slightly 
ahead  of  creative  loans. Congressional Research 
of  the United States finds  that  IPR profit  shifting 
schemes alone may deprive the authorities of the
United States from between $57 billion and up to 
$90 billion every year (Keightley, 2013), i.e. between 


25 and 40 per cent of corporate tax revenue collected 
by the authorities. Other developed countries are also 
affected by such schemes and developing countries 
may be those most affected in relative terms by profit 
shifting more generally (Crivelli et al., 2015). Such 
(tax) cost-saving schemes only available  to  larger 
firms have been acknowledged to bias competition 
and  threaten  the  survival  of  competing  small  and 
medium enterprises unable or unwilling to engage 
into systematic tax avoidance.


31  Data were derived from Thomson Reuters Worldscope
Database, from which UNCTAD has constructed a 
database of consolidated financial statements of
publicly  listed  companies  in  56  developed  and 
developing  countries,  but  headquartered  in  a  total 
of 121 countries. After ranking them by asset value 
and  selecting  the 2,000  largest,  it  appears  that  the 
top 2,000 TNCs were  headquartered  in  a  total  of 
only 63 countries. The choice regarding the number 
of TNCs comes from the Forbes Global 2,000 list, 
which designates, since 2003, the largest 2,000 TNCs. 
Rather than looking at a smaller set of TNCs, like the 
largest 100 TNCs as used for instance in the World
Investment Reports by UNCTAD, it was decided to 
consider a larger number of TNCs to make sure that 
it  has  a  broader  coverage  in  terms of  sectors  and 
ultimately that these 2,000 firms span almost all the 
traded activities worldwide.


32  For  this  reason,  some of  these  top TNCs  are  not 
part of the underlying firms that are considered in 
Exporter Dynamic Database discussed above.


 33  Profit  or  net  income  represents  income  after  all 
operating and non-operating income and expense, 
reserves, income taxes, minority interest and extraor-
dinary items, converted to United States dollars using 
the fiscal year end exchange rate.


34  Far from being evenly distributed, rising returns to 
transnational capital mainly accrue to developed
countries, where  the  large majority  of  top TNCs 
remain headquartered and, to a lesser though grow-
ing extent, to first-tier NIEs and China. For further 
discussion on this aspect, see box 2.3.


35  According to the Institute for Mergers, Acquisitions 
& Alliances (https://imaa-institute.org/mergers-and-
acquisitions-statistics),  the  last  two decades were 
characterized by a very high level of merger activity, 
which exceeded $2 trillion in value per year.


36  Recent evidence suggests that this process has further 
intensified  in  the very  recent past. See Pearlstein, 
2018.


37  For instance, in the retail sector, supermarkets can 
resort to tricks, such as charging slotting fees.


38  As  an  example  of  the  environmental  unaccount-
ability of  large players  in  international  trade,  the 
2015 Paris Agreement does not set any emissions 
reduction targets for maritime transport and civil 
aviation, which  represent  key  enablers  for mer-
chandise and services (notably tourism) trade, even 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


64


Ali-Yrkkö  J, Rouvinen P, Seppälä T  and Ylä-Anttila P 
(2011). Who captures value in global supply chains? 
Case Nokia N95 Smartphone. Journal of Industry,
Competition and Trade. 11(3): 263–278.


Atalay E, Hortaçsu A  and Syverson C  (2014). Vertical 
integration  and  input  flows. American Economic
Review. 104(4): 1120–1148.


Autor D, Dorn D, Katz LF, Patterson C and Van Reenen J 
(2017a). Concentrating on the fall of the labor share. 
American Economic Review. 107(5): 180–185.


Autor D, Dorn D, Katz LF, Patterson C and Van Reenen 
J (2017b). The fall of the labor share and the rise of 
superstar firms. Working Paper No. 23396. National 
Bureau of Economic Research.


Baldwin RE (2016). The Great Convergence: Information
Technology and the New Globalization. Harvard 
University Press. Cambridge, MA.


Barkai  S  (2016). Declining  labor  and  capital  shares. 
Mimeo.  London Business  School. Available  at: 
http://facultyresearch.london.edu/docs/BarkaiD-
ecliningLaborCapital.pdf.


Baud C and Durand C (2012). Financialization, globaliza-
tion and the making of profits by leading retailers. 
Socio-Economic Review. 10(2): 241–266.


Bivens  J, Mishel L  and Schmitt  J  (2018).  It’s  not  just 
monopoly and monopsony: How market power has 
affected American wages. Report. Economic Policy 
Institute. Washington, D.C. Available  at:  https://
www.epi.org/publication/its-not-just-monopoly-
and-monopsony-how-market-power-has-affected-
american-wages/.


Blair-Stanek A (2015). Intellectual property law solutions 
to tax avoidance. UCLA Law Review. 62(1): 4–73.


Carroll WK  (2012).  Global,  transnational,  regional, 
national: The need for nuance in theorizing global 
capitalism. Critical Sociology. 38(3): 365–371.


Carroll WK and Sapinski JP (2016). Neoliberalism and the 
transnational capitalist class. In: Springer S, Birch K 
and MacLeavy J, eds. The Handbook of Neoliberal-
ism. Routledge. New York, NY: 39–49.


Cernat L and Pajot M (2012). “Assembled in Europe”: The 
role of processing trade in EU export performance. 
Chief Economist Note. European Commission. Issue 


though  they  together  account  for  10  per  cent  of 
global emissions and their emissions are projected 
to grow by 250 per cent by 2050. Such an outcome 
was supported by developed countries governments 
(European Union Trade Policy Committee,  2015) 
stating  that “the EU’s overall objective  is  to have 
COP decisions without any explicit mention of trade 


or IPR issues and to minimize discussion on trade-
related  issues. Any  attempt  to  create  any  kind  of 
provision/agenda item/work programme/mechanism 
on trade/IPR at the UNFCCC discussions cannot be 
accepted”.


39  Available  at:  https://www.wto.org/english/docs_e/
legal_e/havana_e.pdf.


References


No. 3. Available at: http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/
docs/2012/october/tradoc_150006.pdf.


Chang HJ (2003). Globalisation, Economic Development
and the Role of the State. Zed Books. London.


Chen W, Gouma R, Los B and Timmer MP (2017). Meas-
uring the income to intangibles in goods production: 
A global value chain approach. Economic Research 
Working Paper No. 36. World Intellectual Property 
Organization.


China Labor Watch (2012). Beyond Foxconn: Deplorable
Working Conditions Characterize Apple’s Entire Sup-
ply Chain. China Labor Watch. New York, NY. Avail-
able at: http://www.chinalaborwatch.org/report/62.


Crivelli E, De Mooij R and Keen M (2015). Base erosion, 
profit  shifting  and developing  countries. Working 
Paper No. 15/118. International Monetary Fund.


Dai M, Maitra M and Yu M (2016). Unexceptional exporter 
performance in China? The role of processing trade. 
Journal of Development Economics. 121: 177–189.


de Sousa J (2012). The currency union effect on trade is 
decreasing over  time. Economics Letters.  117(3): 
917–920.


de Vries GJ (2018). Global value chain and domestic value 
added export analysis using the World Input–Output 
Database: Methods and an illustration. Background 
material prepared for the Trade and Development
Report 2018.


de Vries GJ, Miroudot S and Timmer M (2018). Functional 
specialization in international trade: An exploration 
based on occupations of workers. Mimeo. University 
of Groningen.


Dedrick J, Kraemer KL and Linden G (2010). Who profits 
from innovation in global value chains? A study of 
the iPod and notebook PCs. Industrial and Corporate
Change. 19(1): 81–116.


Diez F, Leigh D and Tambunlertchai S (2018). Global mar-
ket power and its macroeconomic implications. Work-
ing Paper No. 18/137. International Monetary Fund.


Driskill R (2012). Deconstructing the argument for free 
trade: A case study of the role of economists in policy 
debates. Economics and Philosophy. 28(1): 1–30.


Escaith H and Gaudin H (2014). Clustering value-added 
trade:  Structural  and  policy  dimensions.  Staff 




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


65


Working  Paper  ERSD-2014-08. World  Trade 
Organization.


European Union Trade Policy Committee  (2015). TPC 
– 20.11.2015: UNFCCC and Trade-related  issues 
and intellectual property. Internal document leaked. 
Available  at:  https://corporateeurope.org/sites/
default/files/attachments/trade_and_climate_-_
trade_policy_committee.pdf.


Feenstra RC, Lipsey RE, Branstetter LG, Foley CF, Har-
rigan J, Jensen JB, Kletzer L, Mann C, Schott PK 
and Wright GC (2010). Report on the state of avail-
able data for the study of international trade and
foreign direct investment. Working Paper No. 16254. 
National Bureau of Economic Research.


Fernandes AM, Freund C and Pierola MD (2016). Exporter
behavior,  country  size  and  stage  of  development: 
Evidence  from  the  exporter  dynamics  database. 
Journal of Development Economics. 119: 121–137.


Freund C  and  Pierola MD  (2015).  Export  superstars. 
The Review of Economics and Statistics.  97(5): 
1023–1032.


Fu X  (2018). Trade  in  intangibles  and  a  global  value 
chain-based view of international trade and global 
imbalance. Working Paper Series No.  078. Tech-
nology and Management Centre for Development. 
University of Oxford.


Galbraith JK (2012). Inequality and Instability: A Study
of the World Economy Just Before the Great Crisis. 
Oxford University Press. Oxford.


Gallagher KP and Zarsky L (2007). The Enclave Economy:
Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in
Mexico’s Silicon Valley. MIT Press. Cambridge, MA.


Goldberg PK and Pavcnik N (2007). Distributional effects 
of globalization in developing countries. Journal of
Economic Literature. 45(1): 39–82.


Grant M  (2018). Why  special  economic  zones? Using 
trade  policy  to  discriminate  across  importers. 
Mimeo. United  States  International Trade Com-
mission. Available  at:  https://drive.google.com/
file/d/0B_4Z5rmKH1P5VE0yV1QxZ0JaZTg/view. 


Grubert H (2003). Intangible income, intercompany trans-
actions, income shifting, and the choice of location. 
National Tax Journal. 56(1, part 2): 221–242.


Hanson GH (2012). The rise of middle kingdoms: Emerg-
ing economies in global trade. Journal of Economic
Perspectives. 26(2): 41−64.


Harrison A, McLaren J and McMillan M (2011). Recent 
perspectives on trade and inequality. Annual Review
of Economics. 3: 261–289.


Havice E and Campling L (2017). Where chain govern-
ance and environmental governance meet: Interfirm 
strategies  in  the  canned  tuna  global  value  chain . 
Economic Geography. 93(3): 292–313.


Hofmann C, Osnago A and Ruta M (2017). Horizontal 
depth: A new database on the content of preferential 
trade agreements. Policy Research Working Paper 
No. 7981. World Bank.


Hummels D, Ishii J and Yi KM (2001). The nature and 
growth  of  vertical  specialization  in world  trade. 
Journal of International Economics. 54(1): 75–96.


ILO (2014). Trade Union Manual on Export Processing
Zones. International Labour Organization. Geneva.


IMF (2013). Fiscal Monitor 2013: Taxing Times. Interna-
tional Monetary Fund. Washington, D.C.


Johnson RC  (2018,  forthcoming). Measuring  global 
value  chains.  Annual Review of Economics. 
August. Published online ahead of print. Available 
at:  https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/
annurev-economics-080217-053600.


Kee HL  and Tang H  (2016). Domestic  value  added  in 
exports: Theory  and  firm  evidence  from China. 
American Economic Review. 106(6): 1402–1436.


Keightley MP  (2013). An  analysis  of where American 
companies report profits: Indications of profit
shifting. CRS Report No. R42927, Congressional 
Research Service. Available at: https://digital.library.
unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc462866/.


Kindleberger CP (1969). American Business Abroad: Six
Lectures on Direct Investment. Yale University Press. 
New Haven, CT.


Kindleberger CP, ed. (1970). The International Corpora-
tion: A Symposium. MIT Press. Cambridge, MA.


Kohler P and Cripps F (2018). Do trade and investment 
(agreements) foster development or inequality? New 
evidence on the impact of GVC-led fragmentation 
and  top  2000 TNC-driven  concentration. GDAE 
Working Papers. Tufts University.


Kohler P and Storm S (2016). CETA without blinders: How 
cutting “trade costs and more” will cause unemploy-
ment, inequality, and welfare losses. International
Journal of Political Economy. 45(4): 257–293.


Koopman R, Wang Z and Wei S-J (2014). Tracing value-
added and double counting in gross exports. Ameri-
can Economic Review. 104(2): 459–494.


Lederer EM (2017). SBA: Only 1 percent of America’s 
small businesses export overseas. Associated Press. 
12 May. Available at: https://www.inc.com/associ-
ated-press/linda-mcmahon-small-business-adminis-
tration-exports-only-1-percent-small-business.html.


Lewis A  (1979). The  slowing  down  of  the  engine  of 
growth. Lecture  to  the memory  of Alfred Nobel. 
8 December. Available at: https://www.nobelprize.
org/nobel_prizes/economic-sciences/laureates/1979/
lewis-lecture.html.


Lipsey RE  (2009). Measuring  international  trade  in 
services.  In: Reinsdorf M and Slaughter MJ,  eds. 
International Trade in Services and Intangibles in
the Era of Globalization. University  of Chicago 
Press. Chicago: 27–70.


Lopez Gonzalez J, Kowalski P and Achard P (2015). Trade, 
global  value  chains  and wage-income  inequality. 
Trade Policy Papers No. 182. Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-operation and Development.


Lu D  (2010). Exceptional  exporter  performance? Evi-
dence from Chinese manufacturing firms. Mimeo. 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


66


University of Chicago. Available at: http://crifes.psu.
edu/papers/DanLuJMP.pdf.


Lu  J,  Lu Y  and Tao Z  (2010).  Exporting  behavior  of 
foreign affiliates: Theory and evidence. Journal of
International Economics. 81(2): 197–205.


Maddison A (2006). The World Economy (Two-in-One Edi-
tion). Volume 1: A Millennial Perspective; Volume
2: Historical Statistics. OECD Publishing. Paris.


Markusen JR (1984). Multinationals, multi-plant econo-
mies, and the gains from trade. Journal of Interna-
tional Economics. 16(3/4): 205–226.


Markusen JR (2004). Multinational Firms and the Theory
of International Trade. MIT Press. Cambridge, MA.


Markusen JR and Venables AJ (1998). Multinational firms 
and the new trade theory. Journal of International
Economics. 46(2): 183–203.


Meagher K, Mann L  and Bolt M  (2016).  Introduction: 
Global economic inclusion and african workers. The
Journal of Development Studies. 52(4): 471–482.


Melitz MJ (2003). The impact of trade on intra-industry 
reallocations  and  aggregate  industry  productivity. 
Econometrica. 71(6): 1695–1725.


Menell PS and Scotchmer S (2007). Intellectual property 
law. In: Polinsky AM and Shavell S, eds. Handbook
of Law and Economics, Volume 2. North-Holland. 
Amsterdam: 1473–1570.


Merchant B (2017). The One Device: The Secret History
of the iPhone. Bantam Press. London.


Milberg W and Winkler D (2013). Outsourcing Econom-
ics: Global Value Chains in Capitalist Development. 
Cambridge University Press. New York, NY.


Namur Declaration (2016). 5 December. Available at: http://
declarationdenamur.eu/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/
EN-D%C3%A9claration-de-Namur-EN-.pdf.


Paus E (2014). Industrial development strategies in Costa 
Rica: When structural change and domestic capa-
bility accumulation diverge.  In: Salazar-Xirinachs 
JM, Nübler I and Kozul-Wright R, eds. Transform-
ing Economies: Making Industrial Policy Work
for Growth, Jobs and Development.  International 
Labour Office. Geneva: 181−211.


Pavcnik N (2017). The impact of trade on inequality in 
developing  countries. Working Paper No.  23878. 
National Bureau of Economic Research.


Pavlínek P  (2016). Whose  success? The  state–foreign 
capital nexus and the development of the automotive
industry in Slovakia. European Urban and Regional
Studies. 23(4): 571–593.


Pavlínek P and Ženka J (2016). Value creation and value 
capture in the automotive industry: Empirical evi-
dence from Czechia. Environment and Planning A:
Economy and Space. 48(5): 937−959.


Pearlstein S (2018). Beware the “mother of all credit bub-
bles”. Washington Post. 8 June. 


Piketty T (2016). We must rethink globalization, or Trumpism 
will prevail. The Guardian. 16 November. Available at: 
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/
nov/16/globalization-trump-inequality-thomas-piketty.


Plank L and Staritz C (2013). “Precarious upgrading” in 
electronics global production networks  in Central 
and Eastern Europe: The  cases  of Hungary  and 
Romania. Working Paper No. 31. Austrian Founda-
tion for Development Research.


Platt E, Scaggs A and Bullock N (2017). How Apple and 
co became some of America’s largest debt collectors. 
Financial Times. 15 September. 


Poon D (2014). China’s development trajectory: A strategic 
opening for industrial policy in the South. Discussion 
Paper No. 218. UNCTAD. Available at: http://unctad.
org/en/PublicationsLibrary/osgdp20144_en.pdf.


Poon D (2018). China broke the rules of global trade – 
but  for  good  reason. South China Morning Post. 
21 June. Available at: https://www.scmp.com/com-
ment/insight-opinion/united-states/article/2151688/
china-broke-rules-global-trade-good-reason.


Quentin D  and Campling L  (2018). Global  inequality 
chains: Integrating mechanisms of value distribution 
into analyses of global production. Global Networks. 
18(1): 33–56.


Ramondo N, Rappoport V and Ruhl KJ (2016). Intrafirm 
trade  and  vertical  fragmentation  in U.S. multina-
tional  corporations. Journal of International Eco-
nomics. 98: 51–59.


Richardson  B,  Harrison  J  and  Campling  L  (2017). 
Labour  rights  in  Export  Processing  Zones with 
a  focus  on GSP+  beneficiary  countries.  Euro-
pean Parliament Think Tank. Available  at:  http://
www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/document.
html?reference=EXPO_STU(2017)603839.


Rodrik D (2011). The Globalization Paradox: Democracy
and the Future of the World Economy. WW Norton. 
New York, NY.


Rodrik D (2017). The fatal flaw of neoliberalism: It’s bad 
economics. The Guardian. 14 November. Available 
at: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/nov/14/
the-fatal-flaw-of-neoliberalism-its-bad-economics.


Rodrik D (2018). What do  trade agreements  really do? 
Journal of Economic Perspectives. 32(2): 73–90.


Rose AK (2004). Do we really know that the WTO increases 
trade? American Economic Review. 94(1): 98–114.


Setser BW and  Frank C  (2018).  Figure: The  scale  of 
global  tax  arbitrage.  In:  Setser, BW. The  impact 
of  tax arbitrage on  the U.S. balance of payments. 
Blog  post. Council  on Foreign Relations.  9 Feb-
ruary. Available  at:  https://www.cfr.org/blog/
impact-tax-arbitrage-us-balance-payments.


Starrs S (2014). The chimera of global convergence. New
Left Review. 87(May/June): 81–96.


Temin P (2017). The Vanishing Middle Class: Prejudice
and Power in a Dual Economy. MIT Press. Cam-
bridge, MA.


Timmer MP, Erumban AA, Los B, Stehrer R and de Vries 
GJ (2014). Slicing up global value chains. Journal
of Economic Perspectives. 28(2): 99–118.


UNCTAD  (1964). Proceedings of the United Nations
Conference on Trade and Development. Geneva,




THE SHIFTING CONTOURS OF TRADE UNDER HYPERGLOBALIZATION


67


23 March–16 June. Volume I. Final Act and Report
(United Nations publication. Sales No. 64.II.B.11. 
New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD  (2013). Economic Development in Africa
Report: Intra-African Trade – Unlocking Private
Sector Dynamism (United Nations publication. Sales 
No. E.13.II.D.2. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (2017a). Review of Maritime Transport 2017
(United Nations publication. Sales No. E.17.II.D.10. 
New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD  (2017b). Report of the Intergovernmental
Group of Experts on Financing for Development
on Its First Session. Trade and Development Board 
Intergovernmental Group of Experts on Financing 
for Development.  First  session. TD/B/EFD/1/3. 
Geneva, 8–10 November. 


UNCTAD (TDR 1995). Trade and Development Report,
1995  (United Nation publication. Sales No. E.95. 
II.D.16. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 1996). Trade and Development Report,
1996  (United Nations publication. Sales No.E.96.
II.D.6. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 1997). Trade and Development Report,
1997: Globalization, Distribution and Growth
(United Nations publication. Sales No. E.97.II.D.8. 
New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2002). Trade and Development Report,
2002: Developing Countries in World Trade (United
Nations  publication.  Sales No. E.02.II.D.2. New 
York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2003). Trade and Development Report,
2003: Capital Accumulation, Growth and Structural
Change (United Nations publication. Sales No. E.03.
II.D.7. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2011). Trade and Development Report,
2011: Post-Crisis Policy Challenges in the World
Economy (United Nations  publication.  Sales No. 
E.11.II.D.3. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2014). Trade and Development Report,
2014: Global Governance and Policy Space for


Development  (United Nations  publication.  E.14. 
II.D.4. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2016). Trade and Development Report,
2016: Structural Transformation for Inclusive and
Sustained Growth (United Nations publication. Sales 
No. E.16.II.D.5. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2017). Trade and Development Report,
2017: Beyond Austerity: Towards a Global New Deal
(United Nations publication. Sales No. E.17.II.D.5. 
New York and Geneva).


United Nations (2015). Resolution adopted by the Gen-
eral Assembly on 25 September. Transforming Our 
World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Develop-
ment (A/RES/70/1).


USTR (Office of the United States Trade Representative) 
(2018).  Finding  of  the  Investigation  into China’s 
Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology 
Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation under 
Section  301  of  the Trade Act  of  1974. Available 
at:  https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/Section%20
301%20FINAL.PDF.


WIPO (2017). World Intellectual Property Report 2017:
Intangible Capital in Global Value Chains. World 
Intellectual Property Organization. Geneva.


World Bank  (2017). World Development Report 2017:
Governance and the Law. World Bank. Washington, 
D.C.


World Bank,  the  Institute  of Developing  Economies, 
the Organisation  for Economic Co-operation  and 
Development, the Research Center of Global Value 
Chains and  the World Trade Organization (2017). 
Global Value Chain Development Report: Measur-
ing and Analyzing the Impact of GVCs on Economic
Development. World Bank. Washington, D.C.


WTO (2012).  Intellectual Property  Issues. World Trade 
Organization. Available  at:  https://www.wto.org/
english/news_e/infocenter_e/brief_ip_e.doc.


Zingales L (2017). Towards a political theory of the firm. 
Journal of Economic Perspectives. 31(3): 113–130.






69


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL
WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND
POLICY OPTIONS III


Digital technologies have already transformed how 
people communicate, learn, work and shop. They are 
also  changing  the geography of  economic  activity 
through  their  impact  on  corporate  strategy,  invest-
ment behaviour and trade flows. From a development 
perspective, the promise of digitalization is that it will 
open new sectors, promote new markets, boost inno-
vation and generate the productivity gains needed to 
lift living standards in developing countries. Fulfilling 
this promise of a new digital future will, for many 
developing  countries,  require  an  ambitious  pro-
gramme of infrastructure support and skills training. 
However, assessing the wider use and impact of these 
new  technologies,  particularly with  respect  to  the 
2030 Development Agenda, cannot be divorced from 
the economic environment in which they are nested.


As discussed in previous Reports, today’s hyperglo-
balized world has become more unequal, unstable and 
insecure: rent extraction has become an acceptable
feature of doing business at the top of the corporate 
food  chain  and  unchecked  competition  has made 
for precarious working conditions for many at  the 
bottom. As  a  result,  the  gains  from  technological 
progress  and open  economies  have been  captured 
by a small portion of society, while their costs have 
been carried by an increasingly frustrated majority. 
A key question therefore is whether, given this “win-
ner-takes-most” environment,  the spread of digital 
technologies risks further concentrating the benefits 
among a small number of first movers, both across 
and within countries, or whether  it will operate  to 
disrupt the status quo and promote greater inclusion.


If history is any guide, while skill development and 
infrastructure provision will be necessary for help-
ing  developing  countries  integrate  into  the  digital 
economy,  ensuring  developmental  benefits  from 
digitalization will  require  a more  comprehensive 


strategy and a much fuller range of policy measures. 
Among  the most  critical  additional  policy  chal-
lenge is that of adopting competition and regulatory 
frameworks to address potential adverse effects on 
market structure, innovation and the distribution of 
gains  from digitalization. The combination of net-
work effects and rent-seeking behaviour associated 
with the digitization of data that transcend borders, 
must also be closely monitored and carefully man-
aged. Accordingly, developing countries will need 
to  preserve,  and  possibly  expand,  their  available 
policy space to effectively manage integration into 
the global digital economy.


Another  critical  challenge will  be harnessing new 
digital  technologies  to  local development capacity 
so that developing countries can enjoy rising shares 
of value added in manufacturing and service activi-
ties. TDR 2017 examined this challenge with specific 
reference to robot-based automation; this chapter
examines how a broader set of digital technologies, 
from  computer-aided  design  to  big-data  analysis, 
could  transform  the  entire manufacturing process. 
The  chapter  uses  the  value  chain  framework  to 
explore the potential for, and the risks to, developing 
countries  from using  new digital  technologies.1 It
argues that digitalization and the associated erosion 
of the boundary between industry and services may
make value  chains  shorter,  customized production 
possible and smaller production runs more profitable 
by  allowing  for  the  design,  production  and  post-
production segments of the manufacturing process 
to  be more  closely  interwoven. This  could  either 
open new manufacturing possibilities for develop-
ing  countries  or  reduce  some  that  are  currently 
available. Whether  the  high value  added pre-  and 
post-production segments move to developing coun-
tries will depend on the governance of these chains, 
the structure of markets, the bargaining power of local 


A. Introduction




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


70


firms and policymakers and the policies employed to 
effect a more strategic pattern of integration into the 
digital economy.


The wider use of digital technologies is still unfold-
ing, particularly  in developing countries, and their 
precise impacts remain uncertain. A clear understand-
ing of the channels through which these technologies 
may affect income generation in developing countries 
is crucial to monitoring and influencing these effects. 
Contributing to such an understanding and indicating 
associated policy options are the main objectives of 
this chapter.2


The chapter is structured as follows. The next sec-
tion examines some of the channels through which 
digitalization may  affect  the  various  segments  of 
the  production  process,  the way  it  is  organized 
through value chains and the possible distributional 
consequences. The key takeaway is that by making 
the  various  segments  of  the  process more  closely 
interwoven,  digitalization  alters  the  distribution 
of value  added  in value chains. This may provide 
developing  countries with  new  opportunities  for 
upgrading  towards  high  value  added  segments  of 
the manufacturing  process,  especially  if  they  can 


leverage  data  on market  demand  for  design  and 
manufacturing decisions. However, control over both 
design and marketing processes is required for this, 
and this has been constrained by monopolies driven
by intellectual property rights, as noted in TDR 2017. 
To date, the evidence suggests that both labour and 
local  producers  in  developing  countries  are  being 
squeezed,  particularly  in  the  production  stages  of 
these chains. Section C examines the policy options 
that might facilitate wide diffusion and adoption of 
new digital technologies while ensuring an equita-
ble  sharing of  their  benefits.  It  argues  that  efforts 
towards bridging digital divides and building digital 
capabilities need to be complemented by adapt-
ing  innovation,  industrial  and  regulatory  policies 
to  a  digital world,  including  in  an  internationally 
coordinated way through South–South and broader 
multilateral  cooperation.  It  also cautions against  a 
premature  commitment  by  developing  countries 
to trade and investment rules driven by one-sided
interests and with long-term impacts. South–South 
digital cooperation is suggested as a way forward for 
developing countries for building their digital capaci-
ties. This could be added to their on-going regional 
integration agendas. Section D summarizes the main 
findings and policy conclusions.


B. Digital technologies in value chains: Potential opportunities
for income generation and upgrading


Digital technologies (table 3.1) are based on informa-
tion that is recorded in binary code of combinations of
the digits 0 and 1, also called “bits”, which represent 
words and images (Negroponte, 1995). This enables 
very large amounts of information to be compressed 
on small storage devices that can be easily preserved 
and transported, and reduces the costs and accelerates 
the speed of data transmission.


The industrial use of these technologies is currently 
at  different  stages  of  readiness.  Industrial  robots 
have experienced rapidly growing deployment, espe-
cially since 2010, even though they have remained 
concentrated  in  developed  and  a  few  developing 
countries at more advanced stages of industrializa-
tion (TDR 2017). The use of additive manufacturing 
(or  3D  printing),  is  at  an  even  earlier  stage  but 
is  also  growing  rapidly. But  this  growth  depends 
on  the  expiry  of  some  core  patents;  currently,  the 
more accessible 3D systems use technology that is 


somewhat  dated, whereas  frontier  3D  systems  for 
professional industrial use remain expensive (Ernst
and Young, 2016). Wider accessibility  is expected 
for this technology over the coming decade (WEF, 
2015; Basiliere, 2017) as well  as  for big data and 
cloud computing (Purdy and Daugherty, 2017) and 
for AI (WEF, 2015).


1. The distribution of value added and
upgrading in traditional value chains


The international division of labour is increasingly struc-
tured around global value chains (GVCs) (TDR 2002, 
2014; World Bank  et  al.,  2017).  Participation  in 
these chains by developing countries is expected to 
attract more foreign direct investment, provide easier 
access to export markets, advanced technology and 
know-how, and generate rapid efficiency gains from 
specializing in specific tasks, appropriately guided by 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


71


the “lead firm” in the chain. Such participation is seen 
as  particularly  important  for  developing  countries 
with small domestic markets whose firms confront a 
range of technological and organizational constraints 
stemming from the fact that the minimum effective 
scale of production often far exceeds that required
to meet their prevailing level of domestic demand.


This  has meant  that  policy  objectives  are  usually 
focused on providing an attractive business climate 
for the lead firm (including adequate infrastructure 
and a sufficiently trained labour force) and avoiding 
any restrictions on the free flow of goods and finance 
that connect suppliers along the chain. However, in 
the absence of solid evidence on significant “spillo-
vers” from participation in value chains (TDR 2016),3
policymakers should also continue to look for ways 
to  establish  domestic  forward  and backward  link-
ages  that  facilitate  a  rising  share  of  domestically 
generated value added, encourage more widespread 
transfers of technology and diffusion of knowledge, 
and support economic diversification and upgrading 
towards  higher  value  added  activities  that  rely  on 
more  sophisticated  technology  and  skill  sets. The 
evidence indicates that only a small number of devel-
oping countries – mostly in East Asia – have been 


able  to build such linkages and achieve upgrading 
within GVCs (TDR 2016).


Divergence between expectations and outcomes from 
participation in GVCs is, in part, a reflection of the 
fact that the private interests of international firms 
do not necessarily coincide with the developmental
interests of the host countries. This disconnect is, of 
course, familiar to many developing countries from 
their participation in commodity-based value chains, 
reflecting, in part, the asymmetric structure of mar-
kets and pricing power of firms from the North and 
South. It also highlights the importance of strategic 
policies, as countries look to shift towards a greater 
reliance on manufacturing (and service) activities and 
exports and is an important reminder that reductions
in  policy  space  can  hamper  industrialization  and 
catching up in late developers (TDR 2014).


Since many developing countries have faced diffi-
culties in achieving the policy objectives mentioned 
above, their place in GVCs has tended to be located 
on the lower portions of what is sometimes referred
to as the “smile curve” (figure 3.1). The smile curve 
conceptualizes international production as a series of 
linked tasks and sees international trade organized 


TABLE 3.1 Digital technologies


Technology Attributes Examples


Robotics and Artificial Intelligence (AI) Algorithmic techniques that make it
possible for computers and machines
embodying computers to mimic human
actions.


Software that can make machines
perform routine manual or clerical
tasks; robots assisting in surgeries;
digitally enabled robots with advanced
functionality to collaborate with or
replace humans.


Additive manufacturing (3D printing) Building products from numerous cross-
sectional layers that are each less than
a millimetre thick. This shortens stages
of manufacturing like design, prototyping
and product layout (all of which are
created digitally) and enables production
to be tailored to individual design
specifications.


Consumer production using plastics,
casting moulds, prototype parts for
production, machine components.


Industrial Internet of Things Digitally charged manufactures that can
embed themselves into the broader
technological ecosystem in which they
operate.


Sensors that are embedded into
products to provide new features for
consumers and to gather data about
production and use for data analytics.


Blockchains Internet-based peer-to-peer network
based on a decentralized system of
digital ledger-keeping that is transparent
and efficient.


Originally created for the Bitcoin
currency in 2008 to allow for the
issuance and record-keeping of online
currency transactions.


Source: UNCTAD secretariat.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


72


within GVCs as involving trade in those tasks rather 
than  trade  in  goods. The  resulting  fragmentation 
of  production  carries  significant  consequences  for 
the spatial division of labour and the distribution
of economic power and privilege. Most of the pre-
production  and  post-production  segments  of  the 
manufacturing  process, with  their  higher  return 
activities, are usually located in advanced economies, 
with developing countries often left with the lower 
value added activities of the production segment of 
the manufacturing process. As Stephen Hymer (1972: 
101) recognized over 40 years ago, as international 
production fragments along these task lines, “output 
is produced cooperatively to a greater degree  than 
ever before, but control remains uneven”; in particu-
lar, the lead firm tends to concentrate its own tasks at 
the two ends of the smile curve where “information
and money” provide the main sources of control and 
where profit margins tend to be higher. These “head-
quarter” economies are still located predominantly in 
the North (now including parts of East Asia) while 
“factory” economies are, largely, in parts of the South 
(Baldwin  and Lopez-Gonzalez,  2013).  Indeed,  as 
these chains have spread across more countries and
sectors over the past three decades they have been
accompanied by a more and more uneven distribution
of those benefits.


In developed countries, the concern is that that low- 
and medium-skilled production  jobs  in  traditional 
manufacturing communities have been “outsourced”, 
first to lower-wage regions of the developed world 
and  then “offshored”  to developing countries,  and 
wages have stagnated while new jobs created at the 


ends of the chain have not only been insufficient in 
number to replace those being lost, but are often out 
of reach to those “left behind” both geographically 
and in terms of the skills required. The result is socio-
economic polarization and a vanishing middle class 
(Temin,  2017). Developing  countries worry  about 
being  stuck  in  low-value-added  activities,  unable 
to  upgrade  towards  higher  value  added  activities 
in R&D and  design, marketing  and management, 
and becoming trapped in “thin industrialization” or 
experiencing “premature deindustrialization”; here 
the problem is less one of a vanishing middle class 
and more one of a receding middle class, as a grow-
ing urban labour force (whose incomes may still be 
rising above the extreme poverty levels found in the 
rural  and  urban  informal  economies)  experiences 
diminishing  employment  opportunities  in  higher 
productivity manufacturing and service sectors.


The critical question is whether and how the new
digital technologies might aggravate or assuage these 
anxieties. In other words, new digital technologies 
could  aggravate  the  inequalities  already  apparent 
across the value chain, as depicted in figure 3.1, or 
with different national and global policies they could 
be associated with a flatter curve and more inclusive 
outcomes.  Some  of  the  concerns  are  elaborated 
below, while some possibilities for deriving greater 
benefits for developing countries are noted in sec-
tion D.


2. Digitalization: Potential impacts on the
manufacturing process


Digitalization  is  often  considered  a  game  changer 
with  respect  to  how  the manufacturing process  is 
undertaken and organized in value chains (e.g. De 
Backer and Flaig, 2017) even though the geographi-
cal location of these changes is as yet uncertain and 
will depend on a range of factors (Eurofound, 2018). 
This  is  because  digitalization  gives  intangibles  a 
more prominent role in income generation, including 
along value chains. Intangibles refer to R&D, design, 
blueprints, software, market research and branding, 
databases  etc.  (e.g. Haskel  and Westlake,  2018
table 2.1).4 The data that embody these intangibles 
and their codification drive the various new digital 
technologies which, as a consequence, are often more 
closely identified with service activities. This means 
that, in a digital world, services increasingly permeate 
the goods sector and that the traditional boundaries 
between goods  and  services  in  the manufacturing 


FIGURE 3.1  Stylized manufacturing 
value chain smile curve


Source: UNCTAD secretariat elaboration.


V
al


ue
a


dd
ed


R&D Design Marketing ServicesProduction


Digital manufacturing value chain
with corrective policies


Digital manufacturing value chain
without corrective policies


Traditional manufacturing
value chain




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


73


process become blurred. By the same token, various 
segments of the manufacturing process become more 
closely  interwoven. An  important  part  of  the  data 
revolution  involves  sales  and other market-related 
information and the ability to customize production to 
the increasingly demanding and heterogenous tastes 
of consumers, including in growing markets in the 
South (Baldwin, 2016).5 The increase in the share of
intangibles in the production process can have other 
implications:  as noted by Pérez and Marín  (2015) 
these technologies allow materials to be redesigned 
to make  them more  closely  specified  to  their  use, 
thereby reducing material use per unit of output, as 
well  as  reduce  energy  consumption  and  pollutant 
emissions.6 What may be most significant of all is that 
digital technologies enable more decentralized and 
flexible production and distribution, reducing some 
of the scale economies that dominated the era of mass
production. This can result in a “hyper-segmentation 
of markets, activities and technologies” (Pérez, 2010: 
139) whereby companies of varying sizes can respond 
to and accommodate multiple demand segments, and 
small producers can cater to niche markets that need 
not be  in geographical proximity. The use of new 
digital technologies may, therefore, allow develop-
ing countries to add more value in their production 
stages, whether or not the final product is for export 
or  domestic  consumption. However,  this  depends 
crucially not only on available infrastructure but on
access to data and a supportive ecosystem.


(a) Potential impacts on income generation


(i) The production segment


Much of the debate on digitalization has focused on 
the use of industrial robots in the production segment 
of the manufacturing process. As discussed in TDR
2017,  the  stock of  robots  remains  concentrated  in 
a  few developed countries,  and  in  relatively high-
wage  sectors,  despite  its  recent  rapid  increase  in 
some developing  countries,  especially China. The 
Report suggested that, for now at least, robot-based 
automation per se does not invalidate the traditional
role of  industrialization as a development strategy 
for lower-income countries moving into manufactur-
ing activities (such as clothing and leather sectors) 
dominated by manual and routine tasks, although in 
countries already experiencing premature deindus-
trialization and low rates of investment, the danger 
of getting trapped in these low-value-added sectors 
is likely to increase. In the longer run, and even in 


the absence of reshoring to advanced countries (ILO, 
2018), as the cost of robots declines further (and their 
dexterity increases), their spread to lower-wage man-
ufacturing sectors and eventually  to  lower-income 
countries  could  have  significant  consequences  for 
employment creation.


The  production  segment may  also  be  affected  by 
additive manufacturing, combining computer-aided 
design  and manufacturing  (CAD/CAM),  or  any 
other 3D software that creates digital models, with 
3D printers that build products by adding materials 
in layers. This can also be seen as an opportunity: 
the likely reduction in the number of assembly stages 
in the production process, the heightened opportu-
nity to customize production and the increase in the 
modularity of value chains could ease the integration 
of remote (and smaller) firms in the world economy. 
Firms employing digitized processes typically gain 
in flexibility and so may be better able  to cater  to 
increasingly  diverse  and  fragmented  consumer 
preferences in both domestic and external markets.


To assess the extent of digitization of the manufac-
turing  process,  the  share  of  telecommunications, 
computer  programming  and  information  service 
activities in total intermediate consumption in
manufacturing may be a useful gauge.7 Cross-country
evidence for the period 2000–2014 (figure 3.2) indi-
cates that this share remains low and accounts for
less than 1 per cent for most countries. It also shows 
wide variation across countries. Sweden and Finland 
record  the  largest  shares while  a  few developing 
countries show very low shares. However, there is 
no clear divide between developed and develop-
ing  countries. Among  developing  countries,  it  is 
perhaps surprising that for 2014 the share of India 
ranks fourth, while that of China remains among the 
smallest of all countries and even declined by more
than half between 2005 and 2014. For most countries, 
computer  programming  and  information  service 
activities as a share of total intermediate consumption
is of significantly greater importance than telecom-
munications, even  though there  is no clear pattern 
either across countries or over time.


Several factors may explain the apparent low impor-
tance of ICT services in manufacturing.8 The small
shares across all economies could indicate that digi-
talization is little more than a media hype. But these 
small numbers could also be a result of the slack in 
global demand following the global financial crisis, 
which has been a key factor holding back productive 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


74


investment. The finding  could,  alternatively,  point 
to  another  form of  the Solow paradox –  you  can 
see  the  computer  age  everywhere  but  in  the  pro-
ductivity statistics – in that digitization can be seen 
everywhere except in the national accounts statistics
(Brynjolfsson et al., 2018). One reason for this could 
be that many digital services come free of charge in 
monetary terms (Turner, 2018). Accurate measure-
ment of intangibles such as ICT services is difficult. 
But when estimated as a residual, their importance 
appears to be large and increasing, currently account-
ing  for  about  one  third  of  total  production  value 
(WIPO, 2017). Measurement  issues could play an 
important role particularly in indicators based on
input–output  data,  such  as  in  figure  3.2,  because 
firms may  prefer  producing most  intangibles  in-
house,  because  of  concerns  regarding  intellectual 
property  protection.  Intangibles  sourced  in-house 
are not reflected in input–output tables, which rely 
on purchased inputs. The surprisingly small shares 
for China in figure 3.2 could also reflect such meas-
urement issues, as Chinese companies may have a 
particularly large degree of vertical integration.


(ii) The pre- and post-production segments


The new digital  technologies  and  especially  ICTs 
associated with  the  Internet  of Things  –  such  as 
cloud computing and big-data analysis – make the 
post-production  segment  of manufacturing more 
important, as this is where intangible assets are used 
intensively. Such ICTs tend to reduce coordination 
costs and increase the efficiency of production sched-
ules, logistics, inventory management and equipment 
maintenance. Cloud computing and big-data analy-
sis  reduce  the  need  for  hard digital  infrastructure. 
This makes it cheaper for firms, even in developing 
countries, to collect data and analyse them for their 
business  purposes,  reinforcing  the  customization 
and flexibilization  possibilities mentioned  above. 
This  can  occur  for  intermediate  products, which 
would  support  functional  upgrading  and  building 
more integrated industry structures; as well as final 
products, which would enable intersectoral upgrading 
and entering new product lines.


These mechanisms, which equally apply to foreign 
and domestic markets, sharply increase the number 
of interactions between firms and customers, even if 
these interactions are not always evident to customers. 
Firms  that  own  the  data  from  these  interactions 
and possess the required analytical capabilities can
identify  the heterogeneity of demand patterns both 


FIGURE 3.2 Selected ICT services as a share
of total intermediate consumption
in manufacturing, selected
economies, 2000–2014
(Percentages)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on World Input–Output
Database (WIOD), University of Groningen, National Supply-Use
Tables, 2016 release.


Note: ICT services refer to divisions J61–J63 of the International Standard
Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 4 and distinguish telecom-
munications (J61) from computer programming, consultancy and
related activities, and information service activities (J62 and J63).
Manufacturing refers to ISIC Revision 4 divisions C5–C23. Shares
calculated from weighted averages in national currency.


0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014
2000
2005
2010
2014


Br
az


il
Ca


na
da


Ch
ina


Cz
ec


hia
Fin


lan
d


Fr
an


ce
Ge


rm
an


y
Ind


ia
Ind


on
es


ia
Ire


lan
d


Ita
ly


Ja
pa


n
Me


xic
o


Po
lan


d
Re


pu
bli


c
of


Ko
re


a
Ro


ma
nia


Sp
ain


Sw
ed


en


Ta
iw


an
Pr


ov
inc


e
of


Ch
ina


Tu
rke


y
Un


ite
d


Ki
ng


do
m


Un
ite


d
St


ate
s


Computer programming, consultancy and
related activities, and information service activities


Telecommunications




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


75


between and across foreign and domestic markets and 
customize the characteristics of their products accord-
ingly. This allows for more personalized advertising 
and distribution campaigns that go beyond traditional 
marketing, reducing marketing costs while reaching 
out to more potential customers, and increasing the 
effectiveness of advertising expenditure.


The economic benefits of owning data  in  terms of 
transforming it into a profitable asset increase with 
the volume of data. This gives an advantage to first 
movers. They are most easily able to scale up their 
initial  investment  in  data  intelligence  and  analyt-
ics,  thereby  increasing  the value of  their  data  and 
associated knowledge base. The ensuing increased 
productivity and profitability also provide additional 
finance to acquire complementary databases or soft-
ware and exploit associated spillovers and synergies. 
Such  acquisitions may  include  start-ups, whose 
activities may even have been deliberately targeted at 
being complementary, rather than at being genuinely 
innovative and providing a substitute for incumbent 
firms. Such cumulative processes aggravate already 
existing tendencies towards concentration and cen-
tralization. When this occurs, genuine technological 
progress and competitive pressure may be reduced. 
Equally significant, the high profitability of incum-
bent firms also allows for rent-seeking and spending 
on regulation and lobbying, such as for reduced tax 
bills or for “blocking” patents or copyrights that keep 
potential rivals out.9


Such  first-mover  advantages  underline  both  the 
urgency with which developing  countries  need  to 
act and  the difficulties and associated policy chal-
lenges related to their engaging in activities in the 
post-production segment of digitized value chains.


The greater role of demand-related post-production 
variables in the manufacturing process may be fur-
ther enhanced in the pre-production segment, as the 
new digital technologies tend to make design more 
flexible and reduce its cost. Digital design simulation 
reduces the number of work hours required to create 
new goods.10 It may also reduce the expertise needed
to design goods. The rise in flexibility and the decline 
in cost of pre-production activities may be further
enhanced by additive manufacturing (e.g. Ubhaykar, 
2015).  It  compresses  the  development  cycle  of 
products that may subsequently be mass-produced
based on  traditional  technology  and  infrastructure 
(e.g. UNCTAD, 2017b), or be chosen for more cus-
tomized production based on digital  technologies. 


Using  digital  technologies  in  the  pre-production 
phase could at least partly help to compensate devel-
oping countries for the lack of skilled designers and 
an established machinery industry.


It  is  clear  that  some  developing  countries  have 
already moved some way towards digitalization in 
production. This could provide a stepping stone for 
additional broader engagement also in the pre- and 
post-production segments of the manufacturing pro-
cess where returns are traditionally higher. However, 
whether this happens depends on the way value
chains are governed.


(b) Potential impact on governance and
distributional outcomes


Corporate governance  involves a mixture of coor-
dination,  contracts  and  control.  In  the  context  of 
value chains, it determines how and where lead firms 
organize production patterns across a dispersed set 
of  suppliers  and  tasks,  how  transactions  are made 
between these contracting parties, the marketing of 
the final good or service and how the value gener-
ated  from  the final  sale  of  the  product  or  service 
is  distributed  across  the  different  actors  operating 
within the chain.


Value  chains  have  a  long  history,  particularly  in 
the exploitation of natural resources (Hopkins and 
Wallerstein, 1986). While commodity chains were 
often constructed on the back of the political power 
and  authority  of  a  colonizing  state,  the  economic 
power of the lead firm in these chains traditionally 
reflected a combination of technological know-how, 
scale economies and restrictive business practices
which enabled a degree of monopoly control over the 
extraction, processing and/or distribution of a specific 
commodity and monopsony control over suppliers
of support services, allowing the lead firm to make 
above-normal profits; Standard Oil is the emblem-
atic case (Lewis, 1881). As these commodity chains 
involved more and more developing countries, their 
income losses from rent extraction through monopoly 
pricing was often compounded by a movement in the 
terms of trade in favour of manufacturing exporters 
(Prebisch, 1949).


More  recently,  as  value  chains  have  entered  (and 
reconfigured) manufacturing  sectors  and as devel-
oping countries have provided more links  in  these 
chains,  the  international  division  of  labour  has 
become more  fragmented,  employment  relations 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


76


more fractured and governance arrangements more 
complex. At the same time, large corporations have 
shifted  their  attention  to  “core  competencies”  and 
increasingly  employed  a  range of financial  instru-
ments,  such  as  share  buy-backs  and mergers  and 
acquisitions,  to  increase  their  “value” while  cost 
containment,  through  outsourcing, work  intensi-
fication,  segmented  labour markets  and  insecure 
supplier contracts, has become the principal strategy 
in managing the production process. These pressures 
have contributed to, and been reinforced by, grow-
ing market  concentration  across many  sectors  of 
the economy which, together with a tighter control 
over key strategic assets such as  intellectual prop-
erty, has allowed for a rise in super profits through 
rent-seeking behaviour. These changes in corporate 
governance have been readily extended to the inter-
national level through the working of GVCs.


The interplay of these micro- and macro changes has, 
in turn, been associated with steadily declining labour 
shares  in  national  income,  albeit with  variations 
across countries, sectors and firms. In this regard, the 
spread of GVCs over the last 30 years has reinforced 
an already established trend of weakening bargaining 
power for labour by augmenting the possibilities of 
lead firms outsourcing inputs to suppliers operating 
in highly competitive markets, while strengthening 
control  over  strategic  assets  in  the  pre-  and post-
production stages that allows them to capture rents 
(Milberg and Winkler, 2013).


Digitalization is likely to alter further the governance 
structure  of  value  chains. On  some  assessments, 
digitalization may reduce the control by lead firms 
and shift relationships away from captive towards
more  relational and modular  types of governance; 
as discussed earlier, increased possibilities for prod-
uct customization could move the control of value 
chains  towards  customers whose  specific  desires 
regarding the functionality and features of products 
may guide design and production patterns. But reap-
ing these benefits crucially depends on a supplier’s 
digital capabilities. This is because digitalization also 
satisfies  demands  for more  granular  financial  and 
managerial control and contributes  to greater flex-
ibility for lead firms in choosing among an increased 
number of suppliers. This could increase the risk for 
producers that lack digital capabilities to be marginal-
ized or excluded.11


Examining the manufacturing process as a “pipeline” 
that creates value by coordinating a linear series of 


activities where inputs enter at one end of the chain
and undergo a series of steps that transform them into 
more valuable products that exit as outputs at the other
end of the chain assumes a benign view of the lead 
firm and downplays the hierarchical division of labour 
behind the smile curve as well as changes in corporate 
control more generally over the past three decades. 
As such, it does not give the full picture of the likely 
impact of digitization on manufacturing processes.


The lead firm in most GVCs is basically a cosmopoli-
tan extension of a large national firm. As discussed 
in TDR 2017, corporate governance, beginning at the 
national level, has – over recent decades – been trans-
formed  through  a  combination of financialization, 
neo-liberal ideology and technological advances in 
ICTs. As  a  result,  vertically  integrated firms have 
focused  on  core  competencies,  outsourcing many 
tasks (particularly in the production stage) that were 
previously undertaken in-house. This has coincided 
with and further encouraged a very different approach 
to value creation and distribution focused on share-
holder value and rent-seeking behaviour.


To assess changes in distribution, it may be useful 
to disaggregate  total value added  in manufactured 
output into the contributions by the four functions
that  characterize  labour  activities  in  the manufac-
turing process (management, marketing, R&D and 
fabrication), taking the capital share as a residual, and 
calculating the domestic shares of the contribution 
of  each of  these  factors.12 Doing  so  indicates  that 
the domestic share of total value added declined in
all countries shown in figure 3.3, except China. This 
reflects the well-known process of globalization dur-
ing the period 2000–2014, as well as the reduction 
in  the  import-intensity of manufacturing  in China 
during  those  years. Moreover,  the  domestic  share 
of labour income in total value added declined in
almost all the countries shown in the figure, while 
China experienced a sizeable increase in this share.


The evidence for the domestic part of the capital
share is more mixed, but it increased sizably in the 
United States and to a lesser extent in Mexico, while 
it declined in Brazil and China.13 It should be noted
that evidence on the domestic part of the capital
share is affected by transfer pricing and related prac-
tices, which cause returns on capital to show up in 
low-tax jurisdictions rather than the country where 
such returns originate. Regarding the four business 
functions, the domestic share of fabrication declined 
in all countries, except Canada and China, with the 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


77


FIGURE 3.3  Domestic value added shares in manufactured products finalized in an economy, 
selected economies, 2000 and 2014
(Percentages)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on de Vries, 2018.


latter country’s share attaining almost 30 per cent of
total value added in 2014. The evidence regarding 
changes for management and marketing activities is 
mixed, but the domestic share of R&D activities in 
total value added increased in most developed econo-
mies, and particularly in Japan. Developed economies 
also recorded the highest domestic shares of R&D 
activities in total value added. But there is also an 
increase in this share, although from relatively low 
levels,  in a range of developing countries, notably 
Brazil, China, Indonesia, Mexico, Republic of Korea 
and Taiwan Province of China. This could be taken 


to indicate a general increase in the importance of the 
pre-production segment of the manufacturing process 
across many countries in the world economy.


A  second way  in which  digitization  is  impacting 
distribution  is  through  the  emergence  of  platform 
monopolies,  in which  the  key  strategic  asset  of 
the  lead firm  is  control  and  use  of  digitized  data 
to  organize  and mediate  transactions  between  the 
various actors in the chain, combined with the capa-
bility of expanding the size of such ecosystems in a 
circular, feedback-driven process (e.g. Van Alstyne 


Capital income Management activities Marketing activities R&D activities Fabrication activities


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


Germany


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


Brazil


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


Mexico


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


United Kingdom


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


China


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


Turkey


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


United States


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


India


0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90


100


2000 2014


Poland




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


78


FIGURE 3.4 Types of digital platforms


Source: Adapted from United Nations and ECLAC, 2018.


et  al.,  2016).  Digital  platforms  are  technology-
enabled operations that facilitate interaction and
exchange between various groups, built on a shared 
and interoperable infrastructure and driven by data. 
They operate over a range of activities. Transaction 
platforms enable interaction between individuals who
would otherwise not find each other; innovation plat-
forms provide technological building blocks enabling 
innovators to develop complementary services or
products. Figure 3.4 provides a typology of platforms.


Among marketplaces,  there  can  be  peer-to-peer 
platforms  (mainly  between  private  individuals); 
business-to-consumer platforms, where  sellers  are 
firms; and business-to-business platforms, where both 
buyers and sellers are firms. Marketplaces  rely on 
varied business models. Some act as sellers or resell-
ers of goods and services; some charge a commission 
for each transaction; some are financed by joining 
fees. As they collect large amounts of personal and 
non-personal data, they can increase their incomes 
by  using  big-data  analytics,  or  sell  these  data  to 
others. The largest and most powerful marketplaces 
are mostly based in the United States, with a few in 
China. E-commerce platforms have grown steadily 
and  the  largest  ones  have  vast  numbers  of  users, 
such as Alibaba Tmall (400 million but confined to 
China), Amazon  (304 million  users  globally)  and 
eBay (167 million users worldwide). Similarly, the 
main services marketplaces are based in the United 
States or Asia, and deal mainly in finance, housing 


and accommodation, logistics and transport. Seven 
out of 11 of the largest payment platforms are based in 
the United States and the rest in the European Union. 
The  top  four marketplaces  that  have  received  the 
largest investor funding include three in the United 
States (Uber, Airbnb and Lyft) and one in China (DiDi 
Chuxing). The domination of  the United States  is 
also evident in social media and content platforms, 
with the top seven such firms all originating there. 
The only exception is China, which has been able to 
expand its own firms by preventing the global firms 
from entering its market. Similarly, Internet search 
platforms are dominated by United States firms, other 
than Baidu in China and Yandex from the Russian 
Federation. This is also true for mobile ecosystems, 
with  three United  States-based  firms  completely 
dominant: Android with 81.7 per cent market share, 
iOS with 17.9 per cent and Windows with 0.3 per 
cent of the global market. Internet of Things (IoT) or 
industrial digital platforms are similarly dominated 
by companies from the United States and Europe.


The structure of these emerging digital ecosystems 
is based on data ownership and management, includ-
ing the reuse or sharing of data for more products or 
more  functions within  the manufacturing  process. 
Data, like ideas and knowledge more generally, and 
unlike most physical private goods and services, are 
non-rivalrous and can be reproduced at no or mini-
mal cost, although they are excludable and can thus 
be a source of monopoly. This means that a digital 
ecosystem’s primary source of value is  the size of 
the  ecosystem  itself. An  expanding  system  could 
facilitate  the  entry  of  new participants. However, 
firms  involved  in  the  production  of  non-rivalrous 
goods will tend to seek ways to build fences around 
them in an attempt to artificially create a degree of 
scarcity and, in the process, generate rents from the 
assets they own.


Unlike  a  true  public  good,  exclusion  is  possible 
in  the digital ecosystem  through a combination of 
strengthened property rights, scale effects, first-mover 
advantages, market power and other anticompetitive 
practices. Data intelligence, which is created by use 
of algorithms on big data, has helped lead firms to 
develop unique products  and  services,  extend  and 
coordinate complex supply chains and underpin the
world of algorithmic decision-making. The “network 
effects”  through which  everyone gains  by  sharing 
the use of a service or resource have given rise to 
“demand-side economies of scale” which allows the 
largest firm in an industry to increase and lock-in its 


Types of digital platforms


Category Type Examples


Social media
and content


Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram


Internet search
services


Google, Yahoo, Bing, Baidu


Digital advertising AdWords, DoubleClick, Tradedoubler


Funding Kickstarter, Crowdcube, Startnext


Talent management LinkedIn, Monster, CareerBuilder


Market places Amazon, eBay, Alibaba, MercadoLibre,
Google Play, Apple App Store, Airbnb,
Uber, Ticketmaster, PayPal, PayU


Transaction


Industrial digital
platforms


Google Cloud Platform, IBM Watson IoT,
ThingWorx


Participation and
open services


Citadel, CitySDK, Busan Smart City
Platform


Mobile ecosystems
and apps


Android, iOSInnovation




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


79


attractiveness to consumers and gain market share. 
This makes it almost impossible for competitors with 
declining shares to remain attractive or competitive 
(Foster and McChesney, 2011).


The raising of legal and financial barriers as well as 
more informal mechanisms of control by large firms 
with monopolistic, or near monopolistic, powers has 
already opened up new avenues of profit-making in 
the digital economy. The resulting winner-takes-most 
environment allows lead firms to squeeze suppliers, 
capture  rents  created  elsewhere  in  the  economy, 
acquire competitors, and gouge the public purse even 
when it is reducing prices for consumers.


This environment imparts a strong spatial dimension 
to the distribution of rewards along the value chain. 
As Hymer, Prebisch and others warned in a pre-digital 
era, the rise of headquarter firms threatened a further 
concentration of economic power around heightened 
flows of  information  and  capital which  raised  the 
danger, already visible from the asymmetries in trade 
and  technology flows, of  “the drainage of  income 
through the transnational corporations, as they came 
to play a more and more active part in industrializa-
tion, often sheltering behind an exaggerated degree 
of  protection”  (Prebisch,  1986:  198). This  danger 
seems likely to be compounded in the digital era and 
there is already some limited evidence that while
markups  have  been  rising  significantly  for  larger 


firms in advanced economies this is not the case for 
firms from developing countries.


A  simple  picture  of  a North–South  digital  divide 
is, however, complicated by polarization and infor-
malization pressures within the advanced countries 
themselves. These are, as noted earlier, creating dual 
economic  structures,  by  the  increasing dominance 
of United States corporations over European and
Japanese rivals, as well as by the emergence of global 
companies from developing Asia (figure 3.5).


Still, the drive for scale in the digital world is ubiqui-
tous; “big tech” companies are not only bigger than 
ever but also increasingly bigger than most “tradi-
tional” TNCs, assuming a growing presence in the 
top 100 global companies in the world. Figure 3.6 
shows how  the  shares  of  large  ICT  companies  in 
assets, sales, profits and market capitalization, which 
fell (albeit slightly) after the bursting of the dot-com 
bubble  in  2000,  have  been  rising  after  the  global 
financial  crisis.14 By 2015,  the  17  ICT companies 
that were in the top 100 TNCs globally accounted for 
a quarter of the total market capitalization of these 
top companies and 18 per cent of their profits, even 
though  their  sales  revenues amounted  to  less  than 
10 per cent of the total.


In  addition,  there  has  been  significant  increase  in 
concentration within  the  ICT  industry,  as  evident 


FIGURE 3.5 Geographic location of big tech companies, selected companies


Source: UNCTAD database of consolidated financial statements, based on Thomson Reuters Worldscope.


MARKET CAPITALIZATION
(Billions of dollars)


100 and more
From 50 to 99
From 20 to 49


500
250
100


UNITED STATES
Apple


Alphabet
Microsoft


Facebook
Intel


Oracle


Cisco Systems
IBM


REPUBLIC OF KOREA
Samsung Electronics


TAIWAN PROVINCE OF CHINA
Taiwan Semiconductor
Manufacturing Company
(TSMC)


CHINA
Alibaba Group


Tencent Holdings




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


80


from figure 3.7. Within all the ICT companies in the 
database, the top 1 per cent accounted for increasing 
and dominant shares of physical assets, revenues and 
market capitalization – but nearly stagnant shares of 
employment.


The  emergence of  some big  ICT companies  from 
the Global  South,  primarily  in East Asia  (includ-
ing, most recently, China), indicates that successful 
late  industrialization  experiences,  can  give  rise  to 
large firms able to exploit new opportunities in the 
digital  economy. These  newcomers  not  only  have 
access to data but the capability to translate them
into  economically meaningful  knowledge  and  can 
target potentially overlapping customer bases with 
distinctive new offerings, such as links to local inno-
vators, designers or producers that may provide better 


customized products and create effective competition 
to an established ecosystem.


Whether such competition becomes a more general 
feature depends on legal and policy frameworks that 
determine  the extent  to which  lead firms  in digital 
ecosystems must share some of their data or the value
that accrues from data ownership. More generally, the 
capacity of the different stakeholders along a value 
chain  to  appropriate  the  income generated  is  also 
circumscribed by rules and regulations from actors 
external  to the chain, mainly national governments 
and supranational institutions. Such rules and regula-
tions can mediate value sharing between customers 
and platforms that own data, on  the one hand, and 
incumbent platforms and competitor platforms, on the 
other hand, as further discussed in the next section.


FIGURE 3.6 Share of “big tech companies”
in top 100 non-financial corporations
(Percentages)


Source: UNCTAD database of consolidated financial statements, based
on Thomson Reuters Worldscope.


0


5


10


15


20


25


30


2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2015


Profits Sales or revenues
Assets Market capitalization


FIGURE 3.7 Shares of top 1 per cent companies
from technology, software and
IT-services sector, 1996–2015
(Percentages)


Source: See figure 3.6.
Note: Top 1 per cent companies identified by intangible assets in the sector.


27
31 31


25


43


37 39


24


52


43
47


27


0


10


20


30


40


50


60


Share in market
capitalization


Share in
revenues


Share in
physical assets


Share in
employment


1996–2000 2001–2008 2009–2015


C. Adapting economic policies to a digital world


While new digital  technologies may provide addi-
tional impetus to income generation in developing 
countries,  they  also  pose  challenges  because  of 
the potential for greater monopoly control in some 
areas and the distributional implications of corporate
rent-seeking. Experiencing  the benefits  of moving 
towards a digital world is obviously contingent upon 
the  appropriate  physical  and  digital  infrastructure 
as well as digital capabilities, but additional policy 


frameworks  and  regulations  are  also  necessary  to 
ensure fair and equitable sharing of these benefits. 
While the precise policy strategy will be distinct for 
each country and reflect its specific conditions, there 
are some broad principles that can provide a frame-
work. International cooperation, including in the form 
of South–South cooperation, is particularly relevant 
for overcoming digital divides and addressing fiscal 
and regulatory issues.




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


81


1. Facilitating integration into a digital
economy and ensuring an equitable
sharing of its benefits


(a) Digital infrastructure and digital capabilities:
Basic conditions for integrating into a
digital world


A digital economy is built on digital infrastructure 
and  digital  capabilities. Three  broad  interrelated 
components of  digital  infrastructure which  can be 
identified are networks, software and data; and digital 
capabilities are needed to use them effectively. Over 
the past two decades, countries have been steadily 
building their digital networks (i.e. ICT and broad-
band infrastructure) as the principal tool for collecting 
and transmitting information flows. This ICT infra-
structure forms the base of the digital infrastructure 
as it provides Internet access to the population, while 
broadband  infrastructure  helps  in  delivering  large 
amounts of data at a much faster speed. Much of the 
initial work behind  ICT  infrastructure  tends  to  be 
undertaken with public funding and through various 
forms of public and private collaboration to improve
network  connectivity,  affordability  and  accessibil-
ity. Subsequently,  Internet access and connectivity 
through broadband have become dominated by pri-
vate Internet service providers. However, by the late 
2000s it became clear that wired broadband connec-
tivity especially to remote areas was not adequately
served by private companies. Since the universality 
of broadband infrastructure is a prerequisite for a
more  equitable digital  economy,  this points  to  the 
need for enhanced public investment in broadband
infrastructure in most developing countries.


The second interrelated component of digital infra-
structure is software and its use across a full range 
of economic activities, with increasing emphasis on 
access  through  a  cloud  computing  infrastructure. 
Cloud  computing  provides  computing  services 
remotely as a general utility to Internet users. It can 
be just sterile infrastructure like storage, means for 
processing,  networking  and  servers  (infrastructure 
as  a  service,  or  IaaS),  or  also  provide  operating 
software and platforms  for building custom appli-
cations  (platform as a  service, or PaaS) or consist 
of remote provision and management of the whole 
range of computing needs right up to fully functional 
applications and data-based processes (software as
a service or SaaS). Cloud computing therefore com-
bines software power with network power allowing 
quick, wide  and  deep  global  spread  of  relatively 


inexpensive  cutting-edge  technologies. However, 
cloud applications provide its owners immense
power, as dependencies increase from IaaS through 
PaaS  to  SaaS models:  for  example,  global  cloud 
applications have provided Google, Facebook, Uber, 
etc. the power to become the virtual control panels 
for reorganizing entire sectors. This creates a policy 
challenge for developing countries whose national 
antitrust legislation may not be adequate to address 
the cross-sectoral market power increasingly held by 
such multinational companies.


The third interrelated component of digital infrastruc-
ture is data, which provide platforms with the raw 
material they need to operate. This is, arguably, the 
most important component of the digital infrastruc-
ture, providing the basis for generating huge profit 
streams and potentially changing the relative posi-
tions of countries in terms of their shares in global 
production,  consumption,  investment  and  interna-
tional trade. Many observers have termed “data” the 
“new oil”, not only because they have to be extracted 
and processed from an initially unrefined state, but 
because processed data can also give monopolistic 
powers  to  its owners.  Indeed, because  (unlike oil) 
data are not a finite resource, the ability to exclude 
competitors  from  access  can  generate  even more 
monopoly power and rent-seeking behaviour.


The  challenges  faced  by  developing  countries  in 
ensuring such digital infrastructure are evident from 
the  still  large  gaps  in most  developing  countries. 
Fixed broadband subscriptions in developing coun-
tries are still less than one quarter of the number in
developed countries in per capita terms, while in least 
developed countries (LDCs) the number has barely 
increased and the penetration rate is less than 1 per 
cent. Mobile-broadband subscriptions were around 78 
per 100 population in the United States and Europe in 
2016, but only 20 per cent in Africa. Two thirds of the 
population of developing countries – around 4 billion 
people  –  remained  offline  in  2015/16.15 Mobile-
broadband subscriptions have grown more rapidly in 
the developing world recently, but figure 3.8 shows 
that they are still only around half of the per capita
levels in the developed world. One reason for this is 
the high price: figure 3.9 indicates that despite recent 
declines, broadband prices in the developing world 
are on average over eight times those in developed 
countries (and over 20 times in LDCs) when seen in 
relation to per capita income. While Internet access 
has  increased everywhere,  the coverage  in Europe 
is  nearly  four  times  that  of Africa  (figure  3.10). 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


82


Broadband  speed  is  a  crucial  determinant  of  the 
potential for digitalization and related business, and 
it remains relatively much slower in most developing 
countries. Reducing these large infrastructure deficits 
is a huge task that will require large investments.


In addition to digital infrastructure, building a digital 
economy obviously requires the presence of support-
ive physical infrastructure and institutions, of which 
continuous power connections and access to banking 
and financial institutions are obviously crucial. While 


these are taken for granted as necessary preconditions 
for  other  digital  policies  in  advanced  economies, 
they  are  still  significantly  underprovided  in much 
of  the developing world, and not addressing  these 
issues would further add to digital divides. Similarly, 
the digital capabilities discussed below also require 
minimum levels of education across the society. In 
their absence, much of the talk of digital “leapfrog-
ging” is highly exaggerated.


Digital  capabilities  are  also  referred  to  as  digital 
skills  or  digital  competence. They  cover  informa-
tion management, collaboration, communication and 
sharing, creation of content and knowledge, ethics 
and responsibility, evaluation and problem solving, 
and  technical operations  (Ferrari,  2012).  ILO-ITU 
(2017) describe four kinds of such skills: (1) basic 
digital skills, related to the effective use of technol-
ogy, including web research, online communications, 
etc.; (2) soft skills necessary to ensure collaborative 
work  among  professionals;  (3)  advanced  digital 
skills  related  to  technology  development  such  as 
coding,  software  and  app  development,  etc.;  and 
(4) digital  entrepreneurship which  includes digital 
skills  required by entrepreneurs  for strategic plan-
ning, market research, business analysis, etc. Due to 
rapid advancement of digital technologies there is a 
growing “digital skill gap” which is being felt by both 
developed and developing countries. To develop digi-
tal skills, efforts have to be made by the developing 
countries at various levels: introducing digital educa-
tion in schools and universities, upskilling the digital 


FIGURE 3.8 Active mobile-broadband
subscriptions, 2007–2017
(Per 100 inhabitants)


Source: ITU, ICT Facts & Figures, The world in 2017. Available at:
https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/facts/
ICTFactsFigures2017.pdf.


97.1


56.4


48.2


0


10


20


30


40


50


60


70


80


90


100


2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017


World
Developing countriesDeveloped countries


FIGURE 3.9 Mobile-broadband prices,
2013 and 2016
(Percentages of gross national income per capita)


Source: See figure 3.8.


32.4


14.111.6


6.0


1.0 0.7


8.3


4.3


0


5


10


15


20


25


30


35


2013 2016


LDCsDeveloping countries
Developed countriesWorld


FIGURE 3.10 Individuals using the Internet,
2005–2017
(Individuals per 100 inhabitants)


Source: See figure 3.8.


21.8


43.9


79.6


65.9


0


10


20


30


40


50


60


70


80


90


2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017


Africa Asia and Pacific
Europe The Americas




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


83


skills  of  the  existing workforce,  running  special 
basic and advanced skill development programmes 
for  the  youth  and older  persons,  including digital 
skill  training programmes  in  existing professional 
development programmes, and providing financial 
support to develop digital entrepreneurship. All these 
should ideally be part of an overall national strategy 
of building digital skills for the twenty-first century.


(b) Industrial policy


Successive Trade and Development Reports have
consistently argued for proactive industrial policies 
to manage  structural  transformation; TDR 2016
concluded that an “active” industrial policy is key 
to building the backward and forward linkages that 
can  sustain  productivity  growth  and  rising  living 
standards through a process of structural transforma-
tion. Two elements of the changing dynamics of the 
world economy may be crucial for the effectiveness
of industrial policies: (1) the move towards a digital 
economy and its associated increased systemic inter-
actions between  innovation,  education, production 
and services activities; and (2) the increased weight 
of developing countries in the global economy, which 
may allow for a rebalancing of external and domes-
tic markets as destinations of developing countries’ 
production activities.


The previous discussion of the infrastructural needs
of  the  digital  economy  has  already  specified  the 
supply-side interventions that are necessary parts of
contemporary industrial policies, to ensure bandwidth 
and connectivity, as well as universalizing Internet 
access and other measures. Similarly, the develop-
ment  of  digital  capabilities  also  requires  public 
investment  and  government  support,  for  example 
in digital education and training, ensuring access to 
banking systems and credit, and so on (Vijayabaskar 
and Suresh Babu, 2014). In addition, demand-driven 
policy instruments can be key determinants for the 
creation of demand for domestic innovation and the
potential creation of entirely new sectors (Saviotti and
Pyka, 2013; Salazar-Xirinachs et al., 2014; Santiago 
and Weiss, 2018). A government can do this in several 
ways: (1) as a direct consumer and investor, it can 
act through government procurement; (2) as a regula-
tor, it can affect competition, and hence the level of 
demand enjoyed by individual firms, by determin-
ing the number of licences for certain activities or 
by  imposing  certain  industry  standards;  (3)  it  can 
steer the direction of innovation by taking the lead 
in  undertaking  innovation  activities  or  incentivize 


firms and other players to form research consortia; 
(4) it can promote private demand, such as through 
tax incentives and subsidies, to stimulate investment 
and innovations by domestic firms; (5) as a knowl-
edge broker,  it  can  link  innovators, producers and 
consumers (for more detailed discussion, see Elder, 
2013; and Chang and Andreoni, 2016).


Industrial  policies  for  digitalization must  seek  to 
exploit the potential of using new technologies for 
transformational purposes to create and shape new
products  and new markets,  as well  as  to  compen-
sate  for  the  job destruction  that  the  application of 
such technologies may cause. The strong synergies 
between supply-side and demand-side pressures in
establishing  a  “digital  virtuous  circle”  (of  emerg-
ing digital sectors and firms, rising investment and 
innovation,  accelerating  productivity  growth  and 
rising incomes, leading to expanding markets) speaks 
to the need for moving towards a mission-oriented 
industrial policy in a digital world.


This involves using more dynamic metrics in policy 
evaluation  to  assess  the  degree  to which  public 
investment can open and transform sectoral and
technological  landscapes. Moreover,  governments 
could engage in more than just helping to fund new 
technology. They  could  become  investors  of  first 
resort  regarding  digital  innovation  by  investing 
directly in corporate equity (Mazzucato, 2017). One 
way of doing so would be for governments to acquire 
stakes  in  the commercialization of successful new 
technologies  by  establishing  professionally man-
aged public funds, which would take equity stakes 
in new technologies, financed through bond issues in 
financial markets, and which would share its profits 
with citizens in the form of a social innovation divi-
dend (Rodrik, 2015). In this way, the fruits of high 
productivity growth from technological change could 
spread more widely and fuel aggregate demand also 
for output from lower productivity sectors, thereby 
increasing  employment  and  average  productivity 
at the same time. Empirical evidence suggests that 
companies with large shareholders, such as publicly 
held  companies  and  sovereign wealth  funds,  tend 
to invest more in innovation than companies with
dispersed  equity  ownership  (Edmans,  2014). This 
is because such shareholders typically base buying 
and  selling decisions on  the  company’s  long-term 
prospects, including those built on intangible capital. 
Such  investment  could  ensure  long-term  thinking 
across  the  digital  ecosystem  and  enable  benefits 
from  the  spillovers  and  synergies  that  intangible 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


84


assets may generate across companies (Haskel and 
Westlake, 2018).


A digital  strategy must  also  adapt  to  the  changed 
structure  of  finance  for  investment  in  the  digital 
economy. Contrary to tangible assets – such as build-
ings, machines or particular plots of land – intangible 
assets, such as data, software, market analysis, organ-
izational design, patents, copyrights and the like, tend 
to be unique or most valuable within narrowly defined 
specific contexts. Therefore, they are difficult to sell 
or value as collateral. This makes it cumbersome to 
finance  investment  in  intangibles  from  traditional 
sources, such as bank loans and marketable bonds, 
and, in addition to private equity finance, increases 
the role of retained profits as a source of finance for 
investment. However,  the profit–investment nexus 
has seriously weakened over the past two decades, 
especially through the increased emphasis that cor-
porate managers have given to norms, metrics and 
incentives from the financial sector,  increasing the 
distribution of dividends, buy-backs of  stocks and 
other speculative financial operations in the process. 
As a result, supporting investment in intangibles may 
well imply an increased role for development banks 
as  sources  of  finance  or  of  specialized  financing 
vehicles – such as the guidance funds attached to the 
new industrial strategy of the Government of China 
(Kozul-Wright and Poon, 2017) – as well as policy 
measures designed  to strengthen  the profit–invest-
ment  nexus,  such  as  changing financial  reporting 
requirements or imposing restrictions on share buy-
backs  and dividend payments when  investment  is 
low,  or  preferential  fiscal  treatment  of  reinvested 
profits (e.g. TDR 2008 and TDR 2016).


In addition, regulatory measures (discussed in more 
detail below) such as data localization requirements, 
Internet  filtering  and  technology  transfer  require-
ments (i.e. disclosure of source code) can serve as 
important industrial policy tools to promote domestic
digital  firms  and  allow  them  to  catch up with  the 
leading multinational firms.


(c) Innovation policy


The acquisition and adoption of technology, as well 
as its adaptation to local circumstances, is a costly 
process. To speed up and support this process, devel-
oping countries were advised to ensure appropriate 
absorptive capacity,  including in terms of  the skill 
level of the labour force and institutional structures
to  facilitate  technology  development  and  transfer 


(see  also  section B.1  above). Recently,  proactive 
innovation policy has also found a prominent place
on the agenda of developing country policymakers.16
One  reason  for  this  is  the  improvement  in  some 
developing  countries’  technological  capabilities 
and  technology-related  institutions,  reflected  in 
higher educational attainments and enhanced R&D 
expenditure and patent filings. The World Intellectual 
Property Organization’s  global  innovation  index 
shows that a few developing countries have caught 
up  on  certain  innovation  variables,  even  though 
significant  divides  remain  (Cornell University  et 
al., 2017; UNCTAD, 2018a). An additional element 
of  the  changed  environment  that  is  of  particular 
importance  in  the context of digitalization regards 
the increased spending power and emerging middle 
classes  in  some developing  countries,  particularly 
in Asia, which is creating new markets and thereby 
generating new potential for innovation to meet this 
growing demand. As a result, developing countries 
are being seen not merely as recipients but also as 
sources of innovation, particularly innovations aimed 
at developing customized goods and services catering 
to specific markets at relatively low cost.17


Such customization of new digital technologies can 
be related to the idea of frugal  innovations, which 
are those that provide “new functionality at lower
cost”  (Leliveld  and Knorringa,  2018:  1;  see  also 
Zeschky  et  al.,  2014).18 These  rely  on developing 
country residents both as consumers and producers, 
by focusing on the specific opportunities for inno-
vation, production and consumption in a particular 
geographical location. Unconstrained by developed 
country  demands,  developing  country  firms  can 
benefit from local cost advantages, better local sourc-
ing  conditions  and  better  knowledge  about  local 
circumstances, preferences and needs. They can use 
these elements to design goods and services with new 
functionalities and features that are customized for 
local firms and for local low-income or middle-class 
consumers. Such local innovations also help to reduce 
foreign  exchange  outflows  by  shifting  domestic 
demand towards domestically produced customized 
goods. Digitalization may provide specific opportuni-
ties for frugal innovation by developing country firms 
because they tend to reduce the cost of innovation.


Similarly,  the  digital  economy may  also  open  up 
new possibilities for more reverse innovation, which 
refers to ideas, technologies and products that may 
be generated in developing countries but are subse-
quently  used    by firms  from developed  countries 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


85


(Immelt et al., 2009; Zeschky et al., 2014). These do 
not have to be “frugal” but can include sophisticated 
and expensive products and processes. Reverse inno-
vation may be done by affiliates of developed country 
firms that face sluggish overall demand in their head 
firm’s home markets and, as a reflection of growing 
distributional inequality, a shift in the composition of 
this demand towards simpler and cheaper products. 
It may also be part of the internationalization strategy 
of local firms in some large developing countries that 
initially respond to growing domestic demand, but 
later attempt to tap into lower-income segments of 
developed country markets. Such reverse innovation 
tends to achieve economies of both scope and scale by
enabling customized production for smaller domestic 
and larger foreign markets.


Such  innovations,  however,  increasingly  rely  on 
big-data  analytics  and  other  digital  technologies. 
Greater  interaction between  innovators,  producers 
and consumers is important from the supply side
for design and production decisions, while product-
specific marketing and distribution based on digital 
media could help customers in their spending deci-
sions.  In  developing  countries,  using  these  digital 
devices could allow reducing or even removing the 
long chains of intermediation that often characterize 
user–producer  interactions  (e.g. Foster and Heeks, 
2014), thereby making them both more flexible and 
more cost-effective. Obviously, this is only possible 
if firms and innovators within developing countries 
have access to such data that are typically collected
by multinational  platform  companies. Therefore, 
policies  designed  to  prevent monopolistic  control 
and to ensure that small and medium producers and
potential innovators have affordable access to such
data, are obviously important.


While  intellectual  property  rights  (IPR)  rules  do 
constrain technology transfer, the more so as these 
have  been  tightened  in  the  context  of  free  trade 
agreements,  some  recent  success  stories  suggest 
that it is still possible to overcome the obstacles that
they pose.19 Cross-industry surveys have led some
observers  to  conclude  that  design-related  IPR  are 
considered relatively ineffective, as also illustrated 
by firms’ often significant additional investment in 
brand image and other reputational assets intended 
to increase value capture from their designs (Filitz 
et al., 2015).20 Given  that digitalization may bring 
about entirely new products, as well as enable new 
functionalities and ways of use, it would appear that 
existing IPR protection still leaves some scope for 


active  design-oriented  innovation policy  in  devel-
oping  countries.  Nevertheless, maintaining  this 
scope will also require containing practices such as 
interlocking patents  and patent  trolls, which have 
become important features of competition mainly in
the smartphone and pharmaceutical industries (see
also TDR 2017 and section C.1.d below).


Moving towards a digital world may also broaden 
the scope for developing country firms to engage in 
cross-licensing arrangements with developed coun-
try firms. At least some of these firms may privilege 
protecting their designs through trade secrets but oth-
ers could still be interested in licensing, and thereby 
disclosing,  their  designs  to  developing  countries. 
They could wish to do so in exchange for innovative 
design features regarding functionality and ease of 
use that firms in developing countries have developed 
for their domestic customers, which could also appeal 
to the lower-income groups in developed countries. 
IPR owners may also wish  to  create new  revenue 
streams by commercializing template CAD files or 
software that purchasers can subsequently customize.


To boost digital skills and capabilities, many devel-
oping  countries  are  encouraging  digital  start-ups. 
Digital start-ups differ from IT start-ups that provide 
core technical services in the form of SaaS, in that the 
former aim at digitally transforming specific sectoral 
services like education, health, transport, etc. (Singh, 
2017). These digital start-ups represent a new wave of 
entrepreneurship, which, if appropriately harnessed, 
could  usher  in  some highly  efficient  digital  solu-
tions as well as boost digital capacities, becoming 
a primary source of digital innovation in a country. 
However, instead of being used for expanding digital 
technology frontiers in a country, these innovations 
are increasingly being bought and used by big tech 
companies to expand their operations. For example, 
AI  start-up acquisitions  increased by 155 per cent 
in the period 2015–2017, rising from 45 to 115. The 
digital start-ups  therefore need  to be supported by 
national policies and  regulatory measures  in order 
to nurture and advance national digitization efforts.


In  addition  to  a  sizeable  increase  in R&D spend-
ing  and  the  size  of  in-house  design  departments, 
enhanced  skilled  labour migration  in  the  form of 
both  intellectual  returnees  and  skilled  expatriates 
from developed countries could provide substantial
support to developing countries’ more active innova-
tion policy. While returnees appear to have played 
a crucial role for example in the development of the




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


86


photovoltaic  industry  in China  (Luo  et  al.,  2017), 
expatiates  have  been  instrumental  in  creating  the 
designs  for  automobile  production  in  developing 
countries such as Brazil, India and Morocco, as well 
as in Romania. There, designers have focused on the 
functionalities and price ranges that would appeal to 
customers in developing countries, as well as to rela-
tively low-income customers in developed countries
(Midler et al., 2017).


(d) Regulatory policies


The digital economy creates significant new regula-
tory policy challenges because the network effects 
and economies of scale associated with digitalization 
can cause rising inequality and generate barriers to 
market entry. As noted above, first-mover advantages 
in the form of benefits from controlling and scaling 
large volumes of data tend to create a few highly prof-
itable large firms and “winner-takes-most” concerns. 
Such advantages can also become self-reinforcing, as 
data gleaned from one market can facilitate entering 
new markets or even new business lines. The result-
ing increases in market concentration may sizeably 
augment the financial power of a few leading firms 
and  cause  increased  rent-seeking,  anticompetitive 
practices and attempts  to block actual or potential 
competitors. This means that established competition 
and antitrust policies may be unsuited to the digital 
economy.21


The overwhelming control over digital platforms by 
a few firms, mostly based in the United States, the 
United Kingdom and some other European countries, 
points to the need for active consideration of policies
to prevent anticompetitive behaviour by such firms, 
as well as potential misuse of data that are collected
in the process. It also provides an inkling of the diffi-
culties associated with developing countries wishing 
to  break  into  these  areas.  Even when  innovators 
based  in  developing  countries  come up with  new 
products and processes, they may be unable to reap 
the benefits in an oligopolistic environment, or may 
be taken over by the dominant firms. There are other 
ways in which such digital platform companies can 
slip through regulatory cracks. The concerns about 
lack of labour standards associated with supposedly 
peer-to-peer platforms that are effectively business-
to-consumer platforms (such as Uber) are now well 
known. But for developing countries an additional 
concern could be the concentration of profits gener-
ated in such platforms by the companies that are
largely  based  in  the North.  Such  super-platforms 


(companies that dominate the digital landscape like 
Google, Apple and Amazon) are increasingly using 
algorithms based on big  data  to  drive  away  com-
petition. According  to Ezrachi  and Stucke  (2016) 
algorithms can foster tacit collusions when each firm 
programs its algorithm with a strategy to maximize 
profits. The algorithms monitor the price changes and 
swiftly react to competitor’s price reduction, similarly 
it also follows price increases when sustainable, such 
as when others follow in a timely manner, so that all 
competitors raise prices and profit together leading 
to an outcome not much different from that arrived
by collusion. But unlike humans, the computers do 
not  fear  detection! Further,  these  computers  have 
no  specific  commands  that may  trigger  collusion. 
This makes it extremely difficult to hold the super-
platforms  liable  for  the  pricing  decisions  of  their 
self-learning algorithms, which may transfer wealth 
from consumers to sellers.


Although the super-platforms compete, they can also 
become “frenemies”  to maximize  joint profits and 
drive away competition.22 This interdependence of
super-platforms can severely hinder innovations as
companies know that they cannot effectively reach 
consumers unless admitted by super-platforms. On 
the  other  hand,  platforms  need  an  ecosystem  to 
flourish and contest other platforms. A platform will 
therefore attract independent application developers
to build solutions to attract users. More users in turn 
will attract more application developers and this
feedback loop makes the platform grow bigger, with 
the subsequent economies of scale further increasing 
its market power. The bigger the super-platform, the 
greater will be the network effects and more difficult 
it will become for competitive forces to displace it.


These growing collusions and anticompetitive prac-
tices of the super-platforms pose new challenges for 
competition  and  antitrust  policies. AI  determines 
independently the means to optimize profits and leads 
to an anticompetitive outcome, with no evidence of 
any  anticompetitive  agreement  or  intent.  Further, 
the new market dynamism injected by technological 
advances leads to a transfer of wealth from consumers
to super-platforms with consumers being unaware of 
the underlying mechanisms; it eradicates competition 
from small firms through acquisitions or exclusionary 
practices; and it promotes network effects to grow 
and assimilate further market power.


Competition agencies need to understand the chang-
ing  contours  of  competition  and  the  underlying 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


87


market mechanisms  that  help  the  “big”  get  “big-
ger”, and to prepare themselves for regulating these 
super-platforms. This will  require  new  tools  and 
regulations  as  the  existing  language  of  antitrust 
laws may not allow the regulators to fully address 
the  growing  challenges. This  is  better  understood 
in the developed countries, where the enforcers are 
intervening in some scenarios to regulate the activi-
ties of super-platforms.23 However, most developing 
countries are yet to understand and adapt their regula-
tions to address the anticompetitive practices of the
super-platforms.


While anticompetitive practices have traditionally
been addressed by antitrust and competition policies, 
the  goal  of  these  policies  has  increasingly  shifted 
from a  concern with market  structure  and market 
behaviour to an emphasis on maximizing consumer 
welfare.24 Moreover, the remit of these policies has 
generally  been  confined  to  national  boundaries. 
Recent concerns regarding regulation of the digital 
economy have also  focused on consumer welfare, 
particularly regarding the preservation of data pri-
vacy25 and Internet security, as well as avoidance of 
undesirable changes  in how societies  function. By 
contrast, the extraction of economic rent has received 
insufficient attention from policymakers despite its 
central role in the functioning of hyperglobalization.


One form of rent extraction is aggressive tax opti-
mization  by  locating  a firm’s  tax  base  in  low-tax 
jurisdictions.26 According to estimates by Tørsløv et 
al. (2018: 2), “close to 40% of multinational profits 
are artificially shifted  to  tax havens  in 2015”. The 
digital  economy may  exacerbate  tax-base  erosion 
because  a multinational  enterprise  (MNE) whose 
main assets are intellectual property or data can easily
offshore such assets. While the OECD’s Base Erosion 
and Profit Shifting (BEPS) initiative has taken some 
useful  steps  towards  safeguarding fiscal  revenues, 
critics have called for wider and more inclusive dis-
cussion and argue that  the reform proposals “have 
failed to ensure that profits are taxed where activities 
take place …, in favour of where the companies that 
receive income are based”, mainly because “the revi-
sions to transfer pricing rules continue to cling to the 
underlying fiction that a MNE consists of separate 
independent entities  transacting with each other at 
arm’s length” (ICRICT, 2018: 5).27


Taxing where activities are done rather than where 
firms declare  as  being headquartered  redistributes 
rents and can help build the tax bases of developing 


countries. But it does not tackle the anticompetitive 
features  that  give  rise  to  rents.  Price-based meas-
ures of competition may well prove inadequate in
a digital world where control and use of data is of 
paramount  importance, where  competition  strate-
gies  and pricing decisions may be  determined by 
the algorithms of machine learning, and where con-
sumers often receive services in exchange for data, 
at  zero  nominal  prices.28 Established competition
policy assumes that actors pursue a strategy focused 
on profit maximization whereby unjustifiably high 
prices are judged as harming consumer welfare. In a 
digital economy, by contrast, actors tend to privilege 
scale and market-share strategies. This may involve 
slashing prices, even to the extent of being willing to 
sustain losses, and/or increasing spending to expand 
capacity, including by acquiring firms and expanding 
into multiple business lines.


In  the case of digital platforms, scale and market-
share  strategies may  involve  cross-subsidization, 
which implies that while one side of the platform
benefits from a lower cost of service or free access, 
the  other  side  pays  higher  costs  for  access.  For 
example, Facebook services may be provided free 
of cost  to the users, but the advertisers pay higher 
costs to access the users. Increasingly platforms start 
to organize the markets. These digital platforms have 
natural monopolistic tendencies which emerge from 
large economies of scale, large network effects and 
control over sectors’ data which  leads  to  the crea-
tion of private digital intelligence leading in turn to 
technological and institutional barriers to new entry. 
This results in very high asymmetry of information 
between the platform owner and all other actors in a
sector which is then used to extract profit both from 
the sellers and the buyers (e.g. Singh, 2017).


Although  the growing monopolistic powers of  the 
digital platforms are being increasingly recognized, 
there have been few efforts by developing countries 
to design antitrust policies to combat their anticom-
petitive  practices. Many  challenges  are  faced  in 
designing antitrust policies to regulate the data-based 
platforms comprising multiple customer groups with 
interdependent demand that offer products and ser-
vices in many countries. These include the difficulty 
associated with defining the “market” involved and 
the  power  of  companies within  that market. The 
market is defined for a product or service; however, 
for platforms the data act as an intermediary prod-
uct, are not sold or traded and have no identifiable 
demand and supply (e.g. Graef, 2015). This would 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


88


imply that it is not possible to assess the market power 
of the platform in terms of raising the prices above 
the competitive levels for one side of the market and 
below competitive levels for the other side.


However,  since  the  existing  digital  platforms  are 
changing the competitive landscape, there is a need 
to regulate the digital platforms in order to provide 
developing countries’ firms/platforms with an oppor-
tunity  to  compete with  the  existing platforms  and 
avail themselves of new opportunities in the digital 
world. Some developed countries are using policy 
instruments to check the growing market powers of 
the digital platforms. For example, in 2013, the Dutch 
Data Protection Authority and the Canadian Privacy 
Commissioner’s Office  found  that WhatsApp “did 
not delete non-users’ mobile numbers once a user’s 
phone contacts were transmitted to WhatsApp, which 
violated Dutch data protection law”29 and therefore
forced WhatsApp to make relevant changes for better 
protection of data and privacy. In 2017, the European 
Commission  (EC) fined Google  €2.42  billion  for 
breaching European Union antitrust rules. According 
to EC, “Google abused its market dominance as a 
search  engine  by  promoting  its  own  comparison 
shopping service in its search results, and demoting 
those of competitors … It denied other companies 
the chance to compete on the merits and to innovate. 
And most importantly, it denied European consumers 
a genuine choice of services and the full benefits of 
innovation”.30


One way of addressing rent-seeking strategies in a 
digital world would be through tighter regulation of 
restricted  business  practices, with  strong monitor-
ing  and  administration  at  the  international  level.31
Another  approach would be  to  break up  the  large 
firms responsible for market concentration (Foroohar, 
2017). This takes literally the often-made comparison 
between oil in the analogue and data in the digital 
economy, in that Standard Oil was broken up in 1911 
and  required  by  law  to  split  into multiple  pieces. 
Forcing firms into joint ventures with certain major-
ity  rules  could  avoid market  concentration  arising 
and might be a feasible option for economies with 
nascent  digitalization,  including many developing 
countries. Closer monitoring of vertical integration, 
including by adding the scope and scale of data at 
stake as criteria for merger control, would be another 
policy strengthening competition.


An alternative would be accepting a digital world’s 
tendency towards market concentration but regulate 


these  tendencies with  a  view  to  limiting  a  firm’s 
ability  to  exploit  its  dominance  (Warren,  2017). 
Given that a country’s data may have public utility 
features, one option could be regulating large firms 
as a public utility with direct public provision of the
digitized service. This means that the digital economy 
would be considered similarly to traditional essential
network  industries, such as water and energy. The 
dominance of  neo-liberal  ideology has meant  that 
public policy discussion has tended to have a nega-
tive approach to more state regulation, but increasing 
concerns with growing concentration in the digital 
economy, and potential misuse of personal data, are 
encouraging greater social acceptance of the need for 
regulations in this regard.32


For developing countries, as noted above, the regula-
tory concerns may be even greater if they are not to 
miss out on the benefits of the fourth industrial revo-
lution. For example, it has been noted that disclosure 
of  the  source code of  a  software program may be 
necessary not only for security reasons, but also for 
developing software coding skills, as it would allow 
new software to be created, customized to suit local 
preferences  and  sensitivities,  and  even  adapted  to 
be used in local languages. It is obviously important 
to support developing countries’ producers wishing 
to enter e-commerce activities at domestic, regional 
and  international  levels. Similarly,  the  localization 
of servers can be required for regulatory purposes, 
and such regulation can also operate to assist in the 
promotion of domestic providers of a range of goods 
and services.


In addition to scaling data and chasing market share, 
patent trolls and interlocking patents are widely used 
forms that can favour rent-seeking and act as barriers 
to market entry (e.g. TDR 2017). Moving towards a 
digital economy requires the right balance between 
stimulating innovation and ensuring technology dif-
fusion. This in turn implies weakening, rather than 
strengthening,  the  rules  governing  IPR  (see  also 
Haskel  and Westlake,  2018),  including  bolstering 
technology diffusion to developing countries.


Internet sovereignty is another key issue that requires 
much more international discussion and negotiation, 
since it is now clear that a supposedly “free and open
Internet” is one that can be subject to hidden regula-
tion by powerful states as well as manipulation by
large private players  like  some multinational plat-
form companies. Developing country governments 
need to be aware of these concerns before signing 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


89


on to agreements that could effectively reduce their 
national sovereignty and policy space in the digital 
world.


(e) Control and use of data


All companies, and not just digital platforms, need 
to be able to collect and analyse data for innovation
and efficiency gains.33 However, access to and con-
trol of data can be, indeed has long been, a source 
of market power and can create barriers to entry for 
new players. Policymakers have had to strike a bal-
ance between these conflicting pressures. Perhaps the 
single biggest difference with firms and platforms 
in the digital economy is that controlling data is the 
business model.  For  countries  to  be  able  to  build 
their data infrastructures and use their data to provide
efficient public goods and services to their citizens, it 
is important for the countries to control their data and
be able to use/share their data and regulate its flow. 
Doing so help them design policies for developing 
data processing skills in the pre-production and post-
production stages as well as encourage customized 
production.


Data  is not a homogeneous product and  there  is a 
need,  from  the  outset,  to  have  a  clear  distinction 
between personal and non-personal data. The former 
relates more specifically to data on the consumers’ 
behavioural  patterns  or  education  data,  transport 
data or health data of a country. Of course, there are 
also balancing acts required with respect to concerns 
about privacy of personal data and fears of monitor-
ing  and  surveillance  through  the  combination  of 
corporate and state control over data, all of which 
need  to  be  addressed  in  country-specific  contexts. 
Although non-personal data needs to be allowed to 
flow freely within the country, ensuring protection 
of personal data is extremely important, especially in 
building trust within the country. The laws regarding 
personal data depends largely on personally identifi-
able information (PII), which is used to link data to 
individuals. However,  it  is  argued  that  there  is no 
uniform definition of PII and  in many cases using 
advanced  software  non-PII  can  be  linked  to  indi-
vidual’s data, which can be re-identified (Schwartz 
and Solove, 2011).


To build digital capacities and particularly big-data 
analytics capabilities, many countries have initiated 
policies for dealing with data. For example, Rwanda 
has designed a “Data Revolution Policy”34 which is
based on the principle of national data sovereignty, 


whereby Rwanda retains exclusive sovereign rights 
and power on its national data (see box 3.1).


Developing countries need to retain their data sov-
ereignty to build their digital skills and avoid rules 
which restrict their ability to monitor the flow of their 
national  data. Classification  of  data  into  personal 
and non-personal data and designing respective data 
policies are important steps towards building digital 
infrastructure. There is a need to ensure protection 
of  personal  data,  and  the  recent  European Data 
Protection Regulation offers some interesting guid-
ance on how  to achieve  that. Aside  from personal 
data, there are many other forms of data depending 
on the way they are collected, and the skills invested 
into deciphering them – data can be analysed (analyt-
ics), it can be inferred (codified), it can be converted 
into databases of  the kind  that derive  information. 
Protecting data effectively will call for more serious 
consideration  by  policymakers,  especially  in  the 
developing world.


To encourage domestic  linkages of  foreign  invest-
ments and to develop domestic digital capacities and 
digital infrastructure to upgrade in value chains, many 
governments are using localization measures, akin to 
what they used when they designed their FDI policies. 
Localization policies are not entirely new, having been 
in use in developed and developing countries since 
the start of the Internet. In the context of the digital 
economy, localization measures include requirements 
such as locating servers and/or computing facilities 
within the national boundaries which can encourage 
foreign firms to invest in domestic digital infrastruc-
ture and allow local authorities to enforce national
laws  and  regulations. For  example,  the Decree on 
Information Technology Services 2013 in Viet Nam 
required every digital service or website to locate at 
least one server in Viet Nam. In Indonesia, strict local 
content rules are being phased in on new smartphones, 
laptops, etc. (USTR, 2016). In the Philippines, a draft 
administrative  order  in  2014  required government 
agencies to buy cloud services from the Philippine 
Government’s cloud.  In  some cases, data process-
ing and/or storage must conform to unique national 
standards, or data  transfers must be routed  largely 
or solely within a national or regional space when 
possible. Such policies can be adopted to promote 
local digital capabilities; infant industry protection; 
avoiding  long-term dependency on  foreign-owned 
and located digital infrastructure; and/or to protect 
privacy of the citizens, their legal jurisdictions and 
national cybersovereignty (e.g. Hill, 2017).




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


90


BOX 3.1 The Data Revolution Policy of Rwanda


With a vision to build an innovation-data-enabled industry to harness rapid social economic development, 
Rwanda has launched a Data Revolution Policy (DRP) which will be executed in a span of five years from 2017 
to 2022. With the objective of building big data and analytics capabilities, the DRP focuses on establishing 
standards and principles for data management; establishing a framework to develop human capital in data 
science; defining the framework for data creation–anonymization–release; conducting big data analytics and 
business intelligence; fostering data-enabled technology innovations; establishing an institutional governance 
framework for data; addressing concerns of security/privacy and data sovereignty; defining the role of the 
private sector and partnerships; and establishing a data portal warehouse. The National Institute of Statistics 
is responsible for implementing the DRP alongside other development partners.


To  implement DRP, Rwanda has  already  enacted  legal,  policy  and  regulatory  regimes  guiding  access  to 
information  in general  and personal data protection, privacy and confidentiality matters. The organic  law 
on statistics No. 45 of June 2013 stipulates mechanisms for coordination of statistical articles in regard to 
production, access and dissemination of data while the Penal Code (arts 286 and 287), and Law No. 18/2010 
of 12 May 2010 relating to Electronic Messages, Electronic Signatures and Electronic Transactions, specifies 
data confidentiality matters. Regarding hosting, a Ministerial order No. 001/MINICT/2012 of 12 March 2012 
law provides that all critical information data within Government should be hosted in one central national 
data centre.


The DRP embraces the principle of national data sovereignty whereby Rwanda retains exclusive sovereign 
rights on her national data with control and power over her own data. In conformity with this principle, Rwanda, 
however, remains open under agreed terms and governed by Rwandan laws, to host her sovereign data in a 
cloud or a collocated environment in data centres within or outside of Rwanda. Further, the DRP recognizes 
the importance of building a strong collaborative framework between Government and private sector players 
at local, regional and international levels.


Source:  http://statistics.gov.rw/publication/rwanda-national-data-revolution-and-big-data.


2. Trade and investment rules in
the digital era


In order to design targeted economic and industrial 
policies, as discussed in the preceding section, coun-
tries require policy space in their trade and investment
agreements,  especially  those  that  seek  deep  inte-
gration. This was emphasized in TDR 2014 where
policy space was referred to as “the freedom and
ability of governments to identify and pursue the most 
appropriate mix of economic and policies to achieve
equitable and sustainable development in their own
national  contexts,  but  as  constituent  parts  of  an 
interdependent global economy” (vii). Contemporary 
trade agreements which seek deep integration among 
nations by going much beyond trade restrictions at the 
border and increasingly focusing on domestic rules 
and regulations, not only reduce policy space but are 
also  likely  to  produce welfare-reducing  outcomes 
(Storm and Kohler, 2016). The rules negotiated under 
these agreements are shaped to a significant extent by 
rent-seeking, self-interested behaviour on the export 
side and empower politically well-connected firms 


(Rodrik, 2018). This section highlights some of the 
binding trade and investment rules in contemporary 
trade agreements which could severely impinge on 
countries’ policy space to design the required policies 
needed in the digital world.


Localization rules, as discussed in the previous sec-
tion, have been extensively used by the developed 
countries  in  the earlier phase of digitalization and 
are  still  being  used  (Bauer  et  al.,  2016,  identify 
22  data  localization measures  still  being  used  by 
European Union  countries);  some  of  the  rules  in 
existing  trade  agreements,  as well  as  those  under 
negotiation, restrict the flexibilities of the signatory 
governments  to  adopt  these  localization measures 
for encouraging upgrading in the production value 
chains. Under  some  agreements  like  the Trade  in 
Services Agreement (TiSA), which is being negoti-
ated,  there  is  a  proposal  that  for  transferring data 
outside the national boundaries the operator simply
needs to establish a need to transfer data offshore “in
connection with the conduct of its business”.35 Other 
agreements, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


91


include  binding  rules  on  governments’  ability  to 
restrict use or location of computing facilities inside 
the national boundaries (art. 14.13). Some of the pro-
posals on e-commerce in the WTO include binding 
rules on cross-border data transfers and localization 
restrictions.36 Such rules, being put forward as part 
of progressively expanding e-commerce chapters in 
free trade agreements (FTAs), may limit the ability 
of the governments to gain from FDI to build their 
national  digital  technological  capacity  and  skills 
(Gehl Sampath, 2018).


To keep up in the ongoing technological revolution, 
developing countries are in urgent need of interna-
tional technology transfers (ITT) from the developed 
countries and other developing countries which have 
been able to develop advanced digital technologies. 
The new digital technologies using AI, robots and IoT 
can potentially help developing countries to upgrade 
in value chains by increasing the digital content in 
the production stages. However,  technology  trans-
fers  from  foreign firms by hosting FDI has  rarely 
happened  automatically  and  developing  countries 
have  always  used  targeted  policies  to  encourage 
technology spillovers, through joint ventures, tech-
nology licensing, technology transfer clauses in their 
investment agreements, training arrangements, etc. 
These have been successful in generating ITTs (e.g. 
Newman et al., 2015). However, ITT have become 
much more complicated in the digital economy where 
technology  and  data  analytics  are  being  equated 
to trade secrets (e.g. Kowalski et al., 2017). These 
inputs, which  are  increasingly  being  protected  in 
trade  and  investment  agreements,  further  restrict 
governments from using the traditional FDI policies 
for encouraging technology transfers. One such bind-
ing rule applies to source-code sharing. Source code 
is a collection of computer instructions which are
processed and executed, and whose human-readable 
version (called source code) is usually protected by 
copyright and often kept confidential to protect pro-
prietary information. Recently negotiated trade and 
investment agreements place binding rules, namely 
the non-disclosure rule, which prohibits governments 
from designing policies requiring source-code shar-
ing except  for national  security  reasons  (e.g. TPP, 
art. 14.17). For digital technology transfers in devel-
oping countries, policies around source-code sharing 
can play an important role in encouraging ITT and 
developing national digital skills.


A  concept  closely  related  to  technology  transfers 
in the digital world is technology neutrality which 


broadly means  that  the  same  regulatory principles 
should apply  regardless of  the  technology used.  It 
has also been interpreted as a restriction on govern-
ments in terms of favouring local technologies. With 
the ever-evolving technologies in the digital world, 
technology neutrality can have far-reaching implica-
tions. This would  imply  that  if a country commits 
to allowing the supply of a service then the service 
provider  can  apply  any  technology  to  supply  that 
service, including future technologies like driverless 
vehicles or drone deliveries. Many countries have 
taken  commitments on  the  cross-border  supply of 
services under The General Agreement on Trade in 
Services (GATS), which with technology neutrality 
commitment can limit their choice of technology in 
the future as well as their ability to restrict or regulate 
new means of delivering a service. Some of the FTAs, 
like Japan–European Union FTA (chap. 8,  sect. F, 
art.  1.3)  and  e-commerce  proposals  at  the WTO 
(e.g. US, JOB/GC/94) include technology neutrality 
as a core principle. Whether  technology neutrality 
applies to the GATS commitment of the countries in 
the WTO is debatable (e.g. Wunsch-Vincent, 2006). 
Binding rules on adopting technology neutrality can 
reduce the regulatory flexibility of the countries in 
the digital world given the rapidly evolving digital 
technologies.


While technology transfers need to be encouraged, 
developing countries should be proactive in increas-
ing the digital content in their production processes, 
by  supporting more domestically  produced digital 
services  like  ICT  services  and  telecommunication 
services  in  their manufacturing or by using digital 
technologies to digitalize their production. Digitalized 
products refer to those products which were earlier
exported physically but are now being electronically 
transmitted, for example, films, printed matter, sound 
and media, software and video games. While there is 
a lack of clarity on the scope of electronic transmis-
sions defined in the WTO (e.g. whether it includes 
CAD files  used  for  3D printing or  not),  rules  are 
being negotiated on electronic transmissions (ET). 
The WTO has  a moratorium on  custom duties  on 
ET  since  1998, which  has  been  renewed  for  two 
years  at  every Ministerial Conference  since  then, 
including at the eleventh Ministerial Conference in 
2017. However, as more products are being digital-
ized and exported electronically and as 3D printed 
products pose new challenges as these products can 
be exported as software and CAD files and printed 
in the host countries, zero custom duties on all such 
ET would imply a significant loss of tariff revenue, 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


92


especially for the small island countries and least
developed countries. UNCTAD (2017c) reports that 
in 2015, 101 developing countries were net importers 
of these digitalized products and a permanent mora-
torium can further increase their imports.


While many  developing  countries  are  striving  to 
develop their national e-commerce policies/strategies 
for linking their domestic producers and consumers 
to e-commerce platforms, there is a need to recognize 
the  associated  risks,  especially  if  these  platforms 
are international. Not only do the countries expose 
their consumers to new products and producers
and  risk  reducing domestic market  shares  of  their 
domestic producers but also in the process lose out
on valuable data that is generated by the transactions 
of consumers and producers. The “network effects” 
of these platforms allow them to gather huge data of 
the connected economies, which can  then be used 
by  these  international  platforms  to  predict market 
trends, flood the consumers with products associated 
to their tastes and preferences based on their personal
data  analytics,  and  effectively  reorganize  national 
production and sales. Many of the proposals in the 
WTO if accepted, will not allow the governments to 
restrict the outflow of the data of their producers and 
consumers in the future.


Gains  from  e-commerce  for  developing  countries 
can become a reality only if they protect their
“national e-commerce platforms” with the objective 
of improving the domestic and international market 
access of their producers. Public–private partnerships 
could be encouraged to form national e-commerce 
platforms to boost domestic as well as cross-border
e-commerce and use the data analytics of the engaged 
customers to forecast future demand, and changing 
tastes and preferences. Linking domestic producers 
to the national e-commerce platforms should be a
part of national trade promotion schemes. Chinese 
e-commerce platform policies can provide rich learn-
ings to developing countries. For example, a Chinese 
e-commerce platform called KiKUU operates in six 
African countries, selling only Chinese goods.37


The bottom line is that the potential for develop-
ment provided by digital technologies can be easily 
eclipsed  if  developing  countries  are  not  given  the 
flexibility and policy space to design their economic 
and industrial policies and national regulatory frame-
works  to promote digital  infrastructure and digital 
capacities.


3. South–South and triangular
cooperation for a digital world


As discussed, a precondition for developing countries 
to be able to grasp the rising opportunities in the digi-
tal world is the building of their digital infrastructure 
as well  as digital  capabilities. However, given  the 
speedy digitization of manufacturing production and 
exports in the developed world, the rise of monopo-
listic practices by  lead firms and digital platforms 
across GVCs and the growing digital divide, it may 
be extremely difficult for developing countries, espe-
cially LDCs, to leapfrog into digital industrialization 
on their own. The previous section has suggested the 
need to rethink trade and investment agreements as 
one necessary step but South–South digital coopera-
tion at the regional level can also play an important 
role. Digital cooperation at the regional level can be 
added to the ongoing regional integration initiatives 
in the South, including in Africa.


UNCTAD (2018b) has suggested a ten-point South–
South digital cooperation agenda which includes:


•  building a data economy
•  building cloud computing infrastructure
•  strengthening broadband infrastructure
•  promoting e-commerce in the region
•  promoting regional digital payments
•  progressing on single digital market in the region
•  sharing experiences on e-government
•  forging partnerships for building smart cities
•  promoting digital innovations and technologies
•  building statistics for measuring digitization.


An important step towards digital cooperation is to 
build a regional data economy among neighbouring 
countries. This can help each country as they can use 
the big data of the region to develop AI for manu-
facturing customized digital products. However, to 
build a regional data economy, countries first need to 
“own” their data. Ownership of data at the national 
level  by  governments will  allow  the  countries  to 
decide with whom to share their data. Sharing data at 
the regional level will allow the pooling of regional 
data and digital capacities, and the use of existing 
digital  infrastructure within  the  region  to  process 
the regional data. Similar national rules and regula-
tions on ownership of data in countries within the
region  can  also  help  in  faster flow of  data within 
that region. Further, free flow of non-personal data 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


93


within the region can strengthen the regional integra-
tion process.


Regional strategies  in data cooperation need  to be 
discussed along with the ways to classify data and 
decisions need to be taken on what data can be shared 
regionally. A regional strategy around the ownership 
and sharing of data can provide substantial support 
to national digital industrial policies.


Along with building the data economy, South–South 
digital  cooperation  is  needed  for maximizing  the 
benefits of cloud computing. Cost savings from cloud 
computing can only be realized through significant 
pooling of configurable computing resources which 
will lead to economies of scale and can drastically
reduce the cost of using IT infrastructure (Alford and 
Morton, 2009). Cloud computing infrastructure at the 
regional level can provide significant benefits to the 
public as well as the private sector in the region in 
terms of cost, flexibility, efficiency and scalability. 
Such infrastructure should be accompanied by initia-
tives to build trust in local cloud service providers and
a Cloud Code of Conduct that specifies the terms of 
data usage through the cloud. This needs to be sup-
ported by regional action for cybersecurity.


For all countries in a region to have a level playing 
field in terms of access to opportunities arising from 
cloud  computing,  it  is  important  that  all  countries 
within a regional bloc have a similar broadband eco-
system. Broadband networks can be regarded as an 
interconnected multilayered ecosystem of high capac-
ity communication networks, services, applications 
and users and are the foundation of digital economies. 
Bigger developing countries in a region can provide 
key support  to other developing countries  through 
investing  in  the  development  of  their  broadband 
infrastructure. Countries within  regional blocs can 
undertake similar reforms in telecom rules to attract 
investments in broadband infrastructure in the region. 
Regional cooperation arrangements and the sharing 
of regulatory experiences and practices can help in 
developing this key infrastructure in the regions.


Further, regional markets can be served more effec-
tively using digital  technologies  like  e-commerce. 
However,  for  e-commerce  to  expand  the market 
access of manufactured products within a region it is 
important that there are uniform cross-border e-com-
merce rules and regulations in that region. Uniform 
rules are needed for governing consumer protection, 


intellectual  property,  competition,  taxation  and 
information security. Uniform rules are also required 
for  tackling  unjustified  geo-blocking. A  regional 
e-commerce strategy needs to be developed which 
supports the national e-commerce strategy.


Regional  e-commerce  needs  to  be  supported  by 
protected  digital  payment  infrastructure  capacities 
within  the region. Obviously,  this depends on suf-
ficient physical infrastructure and connectivity being 
available, which is an important prerequisite. Digital 
payments are more transparent and traceable and are
essential for e-commerce. But success in widespread 
use of digital payments requires a strong regulatory 
framework to supervise commercial banks, financial 
institutions and other e-money institutions and rules
around consumer data protection and competition
issues as well as  legal provisions around payment 
clearing and settlement systems. Developing coun-
tries need to be extremely careful in their trade
negotiations as well as investment treaties for pre-
serving their policy space for regulating their digital 
payment platforms. This makes regional cooperation 
in digital payments challenging, but there exist some 
examples in the South. Southern Africa Development 
Community  (SADC) members  have developed  an 
Integrated Regional Electronic Settlement System 
(SIRESS) at the regional level to facilitate financial 
transactions and cross-border payments. National and 
regional clearing houses have been set up to facilitate 
payments between financial institutions.


In  the digital world,  regional markets can be  truly 
integrated  only  if  they  progress  towards  a  single 
digital market in the region. A regional single digital 
market (RSDM) could move towards seamless access 
to online activities by all consumers and producers
in  the  region,  irrespective  of  their  nationality  and 
country of residence. This is an extremely difficult 
goal for the South, given the existing limited digital 
infrastructure and capacities, but should be the ulti-
mate objective.


South–South  (and  triangular)  cooperation  is  also 
needed for assisting countries to build smart cities in 
the South. Although the financial resources needed 
to create smart cities are huge from the perspective 
of small economies, moves in this direction can also 
help to generate financial resources in the future by 
increasing  the  returns  to  investments. Triangular 
partnerships  and  collaborations  can  be  forged 
with  advanced  countries  to  strengthen  broadband 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


94


infrastructure and develop smart cities in the South, 
which rely heavily on digitization.


Another area of regional digital cooperation is digital 
innovations and technology. Many developing coun-
tries are in a process of incentivizing digital start-ups 
to encourage innovations. Small and medium enter-
prises are  the main beneficiaries of  these  low-cost 
high-returns innovations. However, it is a challenge 
to retain successful digital  innovations for further-
ing national digitalization efforts because of a high 
rate of acquisitions of these start-ups by the big tech 
firms, who pick out the most successful innovations. 
This is an area where South–South cooperation can 
greatly contribute. Development banks like the New 
Development Bank,  the Asian Development Bank 
and  the African Development Bank  can  play  an 
important role in financially supporting these start-
ups  and  encourage  them  to  develop  software  and 


digital technologies for use at the regional level. A 
regional  strategy  can be designed  that  encourages 
start-ups  that  cater  to  providing  innovative digital 
solutions at the regional level. Intraregional invest-
ments in digital technologies can foster technology 
transfers and innovations if they allow source-code
sharing and encourage tailoring of the digital tech-
nologies from open source codes to their needs and 
requirements. There can also be enormous learning 
opportunities for the South in its collaboration with
the North for designing tools and statistics to bench-
mark digitization and trace its progress.


While South–South digital cooperation should adopt 
an ambitious agenda, realities on the ground mean 
that  sequencing  and  prioritizing  elements  of  that 
agenda will  be  important  and  need  to  be  adapted 
according to the level and pace of digital development 
of the countries within the region.


D. The way forward for developing countries


Moving towards a digital economy holds both more 
and less potential for income and employment crea-
tion in developing countries than often thought. This 
is  because many  existing  studies  overestimate  the 
potential adverse employment and income effects
of  some  digital  technologies,  such  as  robots,  as 
argued in TDR 2017. At the same time, there is an 
equally exaggerated tendency, bordering on digital 
utopianism,  that attributes boundless opportunities 
for developing countries, through further rounds of 
liberalization, to leapfrog in to high value added and 
job-creating activities in all segments of the manufac-
turing process as well as services (IMF, 2018). But 
whatever position one takes, the rapid pace of digi-
talization is leaving many policymakers unprepared. 
Depending  on  a  country’s  level  of  development, 
unpreparedness can take several forms – from skills 
and infrastructure deficits to inexistent or fragmented 
policy adjustment – and can have numerous adverse 
consequences,  including  falling  further behind  the 
technological frontier, stalled economic catch-up or 
even marginalization from the global economy. The 
tendency for market concentration and the emergence 
of a vicious Medici circle of reinforcing economic 
and political power in the digital world compounds 
that threat.


The simple truth for the governments of developing 
counties is that realizing the potential benefits from 
a digital world will  be difficult,  and  that  ensuring 
those benefits have a wide social reach will be more 
difficult still. It requires ambitious policies in a wide 
range of areas that must be employed in a coherent 
way. Engaging  in digital  trade  is a promising first 
step,  and will  spur  the  provision of  hard  and  soft 
digital infrastructure, which is a basic requirement 
for people and enterprises to engage successfully in 
the digital economy. Digital preparedness in many 
developing countries will require international sup-
port  and  cooperation; UNCTAD’s  eTrade For All 
initiative provides one possible model for such part-
nerships (UNCTAD, 2017d).


Digital  trade  is  not  an  end  itself.  Narratives  of 
the benefits of digital  trade often  take a consumer 
perspective, coached in dollar terms. But digitized 
exchanges are generally paid for in data: goods and 
services are delivered, often free of charge in dollar 
terms, in exchange of the customers’ data. Looked 
at from a development perspective, merely increas-
ing connectivity might empower larger and already 
more productive firms and sharpen the exclusion of 
other firms. Moreover, providing customer data  to 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


95


international platforms tends to result in a concentra-
tion of corporate power that may make it difficult for 
developing countries to get access to, own and use 
data regarding their economies and their citizens for 
their own economic development. Polarization is just 
as much, perhaps more, a threat in a digital world as 
an analogue world.


This means that policy changes in a wide range of 
areas  should  accompany  increased digital  connec-
tivity. Policies that govern the access to and use of 
data are crucial, and should focus on making access 
to non-personal data as open as possible. Access to, 
ownership of and capabilities to analyse and trans-
form data into economically meaningful knowledge 
will be central to reaping the benefits from a digital 
world. While ensuring that data governance frame-
works  appropriately  address  privacy  and  digital 
security considerations, policies should also encour-
age investment in data that have synergies both within 
and across industries.


Regarding competition and antitrust measures, poli-
cies on standards, public participation in long-term 
finance, public procurement, etc. may be necessary 
to increase the benefits to developing countries in the 
digital economy. Also required are bold demand-side 
policies, as developing countries can reap such ben-
efits only if their consumers have the income required 
to turn their preferences into effective demand
without recurring to debt. It must be understood that 
digitalization will not deliver against a backdrop of 
fiscal retrenchment and austerity.


In this sense, establishing a virtuous circle between 
the  new digital  technologies’  greater  emphasis  on 
customized  demand on  the  one  hand,  and  greater 
involvement  of  developing  countries  in manufac-
turing  processes  that  satisfy  such  demand  on  the 
other will require the adoption of more expansionary
macroeconomic policies and reconnecting wage and 
productivity growth.


Some of the key policies that can help developing 
countries  face  the  challenges  posed by  the  digital 
revolution  and  increase  their  developmental  gains 
from GVCs are briefly noted here.


1. Building digital infrastructure


    ICT infrastructure, is a necessary condition for 
progressing  in  a  digitalized world. But  this  in 
turn presupposes the availability of the necessary


physical infrastructure, such as, most obviously, 
power  connections.  In  addition  to  supportive 
physical infrastructure, it is important to develop 
strong banking and financial institutions provid-
ing  substantially  enlarged  access  to  the  entire 
population; this is still hugely underprovided in 
many developing and least developed countries. 
When  laying  the  ground  for  the  digital  infra-
structure, existing internal imbalances, such as 
rural–urban  differences,  should  be  addressed 
so  that  rural  areas  do  not  suffer  a widening 
digital  divide  and  can  benefit  from  enhanced 
connectivity.


2. Devising national data regulatory policies


    To the extent that data is the fuel of the digital 
age, its control, much like with oil in the Fordist 
era, opens huge profit opportunities to its own-
ers (Tarnoff, 2018). It therefore becomes critical 
for countries to devise national data policies to
ensure  equitable  distribution  of  gains  arising 
from data which is generated within the national 
boundaries. Currently,  such  a  policy  does  not 
exist  in most of  the developing  countries  and, 
de facto, data are owned by the one who gathers 
and stores data, mainly digital super-firms, who 
then  have  full,  exclusive  and  unlimited  usage 
property rights on it. National data policy should 
be designed to address four core issues: who can 
own data; how it can be collected; who can use
it; and under what terms. It should also address 
the  issue  of  data  sovereignty which  relates  to 
what data can leave the country and are thereby
not  governed  under  domestic  laws. The Data 
Revolution Policy of Rwanda can provide a good 
learning opportunity for developing countries.


    But  data,  unless  processed, may  be  of  little 
value. Big-data analytics using algorithms have 
revolutionized production as well as distribution 
services. The  limited  ability  of  the  develop-
ing world  to  transform data  into economically 
meaningful  knowledge has  fuelled  the  growth 
of  highly  profitable  digital  platforms, which 
through  “network  effects”  have  been  able  to 
glean more data and use it to facilitate entry into 
new markets and new business lines. The rising 
rents of these super-platforms and their ability to
kill competition from national platforms remains 
unchecked because of a lack of regulatory poli-
cies. This has not only restricted development of 
national platforms but has also closed a window
of  opportunity  for  the  developing  countries  to 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


96


develop their data analytics and upgrade to post-
production higher value added activities.


3. Regulating digital platforms and developing
national marketing platforms


    Regulation is essential for developing countries 
to  gain  from  e-commerce,  else  linking  into 
existing platforms will only provide the super-
platforms with more  data,  strengthening  them 
further  and  facilitating  their  greater  access  to 
domestic markets. Tighter regulation of restricted 
business  practices;  break-up  of  large  firms 
responsible for market concentration; regulating 
digital platforms as a public utility with direct 
public  provision  of  the  digitized  service;  and 
strong monitoring and administration at the inter-
national level are some of the options to regulate 
super-platforms.


4. Taxing the super-firms


    Taxing these firms where their activities are based 
rather than where they declare their headquarters
will help in redistributing their rents and increase 
government revenues.


5. Drawing up digital industrial policies


    Once policies around data ownership and regu-
lations for checking anticompetitive practices of 
super-platforms are in place, developing coun-
tries will be able to prepare themselves for the
digital world. Digital  industrial  policies  are 
needed to enhance the use of digital technologies 
and digital services in production as well as to 
build digital competencies in all sectors.


6. Harnessing digital start-ups


    Innovations are key  to digital  industrial devel-
opment. While many developing countries  are 
encouraging  digital  start-ups  as  the  primary 
source  of  digital  innovations,  there  is  a  need 
for a more comprehensive policy with respect
to digital start-ups, which prevents the gains of 
innovations flowing out  of  the  country. Direct 
investment  by governments  in  corporate  equi-
ties can sustain digital innovations, enhance use 
of  advanced  technology  and  promote  reverse 
innovations.


7. Developing digital competencies


    Developing digital competencies to fill the digital 
gap will require efforts at various levels including 


introducing  digital  education  in  schools  and 
universities,  upskilling  the  digital  skills  of  the 
existing workforce,  running  special  basic  and 
advanced  skill  development  programmes  and 
funding digital entrepreneurship.


Developing  countries will  not  be  able  to  digitally 
leapfrog on their own. They will need support both 
at the regional as well as international level. Regional 
integration  agendas  need  to  include  regional  sup-
port  for  building  a  data  economy;  building  cloud 
computing infrastructure; strengthening broadband 
infrastructure; promoting e-commerce in the region; 
promoting regional digital payments; progressing on 
a single digital market in the region; sharing experi-
ences  on  e-government;  forging  partnerships  for 
building smart cities; promoting digital innovations 
and technologies; and building statistics for measur-
ing digitization.


Given that large-scale use of digital technologies is 
still unfolding and that related impacts are still not 
fully  understood,  international  cooperation  to  fill 
data gaps and develop comparable metrics needs to 
accompany policy efforts at the national level. The 
international community is just beginning a dialogue 
on what rules and regulations can harness the pro-
ductivity and developmental potential of the digital 
economy. Agreement needs to be reached on what 
part of the issues around the digital economy are in 
the realm of the WTO and what part in that of other 
international organizations. A premature commitment 
to rules with long-term impacts in this fast-moving 
area where influential actors might be driven by nar-
row business interests should be avoided. It is perhaps 
worthwhile,  here,  recalling  the  conclusion  of  the 
respected Canadian development economist, Gerald 
Helleiner (2000: 12) in his Raúl Prebisch Lecture at 
UNCTAD just five years after the establishment of 
the WTO:


I doubt whether there is any longer much dispute 
over  the  fact  that many  developing  countries 
signed  the Marrakesh Agreement without  suf-
ficient appreciation of its implications and/or in 
the expectation of considerably more change in 
industrial country protectionist practice than has
so far materialized. Nor, I suspect, is there much 
disagreement  that  industrial  countries  vastly 
overestimated  developing  countries  capacities 
(and, as  it  turns out, willingness)  to  implement 
all of its elements within the agreed timetables.


To avoid any such repetition, it is important to retain 
freedom and space to design digital policies which 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


97


help  in  increasing developmental gains from trade 
and foreign investments, like policies around local-
ization,  restrictions  on  free  flow  of  data,  tech-
nology  transfers  and  custom duties  on  electronic 
transmissions.  Developing  countries  will  need 


appropriately inclusive and comprehensive venues, 
such as UNCTAD’s intergovernmental expert group 
on  e-commerce  and  the  digital  economy,  to  dis-
cuss the complex issues involved and to help shape
coherent development-oriented policies.


1  Parts  of  UNCTAD  (2017a)  also  addressed  the 
digitalization of value chains but focused on impli-
cations  for  foreign  direct  investment  and  related 
policymaking, which  complements  the discussion 
in this chapter. The broad perspective of UNCTAD 
(2018a)  regarding  links  between  a wide  range of 
frontier technologies and sustainable development 
further complements the focus on digital technolo-
gies and the manufacturing process in this chapter.


2  Beyond the questions examined in this chapter, the 
new digital technologies also raise macroeconomic 
issues. Digitalization  and  the  associated  greater 
importance of intangibles may well lead to a decline 
in the demand for physical capital goods. This raises 
issues of measuring output and  inflation.  It might 
also contribute  to an ongoing decline  in  the price 
of physical capital goods and the long-term decline 
of fixed capital formation as a share of GDP, which 
has traditionally been considered the major driver 
of economic and productivity growth. The growing 
importance of intangibles also raises distributional 
issues. These  issues  are  beyond  the  scope of  this 
chapter, but distributional effects from robot-based 
automation and from drivers of market power and 
concentration were discussed in TDR 2017.


3  Fu et al. (2011: 1204) also conclude that “[s]tudies 
largely fail to provide convincing evidence indicat-
ing significant positive technology transfer and spill-
over effects of FDI on the local firms”. De Marchi 
et al. (2018), provide similar evidence for the more 
recent period.


4  For  discussion  and  further  empirical  evidence 
regarding the greater role of intangibles in economic 
activities, see e.g. WIPO, 2017.


5 While this aspect has been a mainstay in development
economics and structural change analyses  follow-
ing Chenery  and Syrquin  (1975),  in  trade  theory, 
Markusen (2013) revived attention to heterogeneous 
demand patterns.


6 The ratio of material use (measured in tonnes of raw
ore or crops) to GDP has fallen in almost all regions 
of the world in the last three decades, most of all in 
Europe and the United States, and to a lesser extent 
in Africa, Oceania  and Latin America  (SERI/WU 
Global Material Flows Database).


7  This measure most likely underestimates the inputs 
from the digital sector to manufacturing. Some parts 
of the digital sector are probably classified in other 
categories than in ISIC Revision 4 divisions J61–J63. 
Only data referring to these divisions are used here 
because available data do not allow for disaggrega-
tion of data in divisions that may cover more than
digital services that affect manufacturing.


8  According to IMF, 2018: 1, 7: “Available evidence 
suggests that the digital sector is still less than 10 per-
cent of most economies if measured by value added, 
income or  employment”,  even  though  “Estimates 
of the size of the digital sector can be sensitive to 
the choice of definition”. Bukht and Heeks, 2017, 
estimate  the  digital  economy  to make  up  around 
5 per cent of global output and 3 per cent of global 
employment. It should also be noted that the database 
used here is the only one available for assessing the 
role of digital services in manufacturing but that its 
country sample covers only 43 individual economies 
with the remainder comprising a rest-of-the-world 
aggregate.


9  Bessen,  2016,  provides  evidence  for  such  rent-
seeking strategies of firms in the United States. For 
further discussion, see also TDR 2017.


10 Such cost reductions may even apply to entire fac-
tories in that digital design simulation of factories 
can anticipate and resolve operational problems even
before the facility exists physically.


11  For case-study evidence suggesting that digitization 
of value chains may hurt small African producers, 
see Foster et al. (2018). For more general discussion 
see e.g. Foster and Graham (2017).


12  Capital income represents the remainder when wages 
are subtracted from value added in exports. It is not 
further analysed as it cannot be allocated to business
functions in the same way as labour income. For the 
rationale of defining business functions in this way 
and related measurement issues, see de Vries et al., 
2018.


13 Data  for  some  other  developed  and  developing 
countries are provided in the online Appendix.


14  “Big  tech  companies”  are defined here  as  compa-
nies of the “digital economy” (defined as sectors of 
“Technology Equipment” + “Software and IT services” 


Notes




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


98


of the Thomson Reuters Business Classification) that 
reached the top 100 of non-financial corporations by 
market capitalization.


15 Source: ITU, ICT Facts & Figures, The world in 2017. 
Available at https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/
Documents/facts/ICTFactsFigures2017.pdf.


16  One  reflection  of  this  is  the  string  of  Science, 
Technology and Innovation Policy (STIP) Reviews 
that UNCTAD has undertaken for developing coun-
tries and economies in transition. See http://unctad.
org/en/pages/publications/Science,-Technology-and-
Innovation-Policy-Reviews-(STIP-Reviews).aspx.


17  This contrasts with the traditional view, based on the 
product life-cycle theory (Vernon, 1966). As noted by 
von Zedtwitz et al. (2015: 12), who also discuss other 
departures from Vernon’s initial notion, “[a]ccording 
to this traditional view, new products and technologies 
are first developed and launched in advanced coun-
tries, and only later introduced and commercialized 
in less developed countries when they have become
increasingly mature, out-of-date, and obsolete. The 
flow of innovation, from a market point of view as 
much as from a technological perspective, is thus from 
advanced to developing countries”.


18  For examples of frugal innovation see, for example, 
Laperche and Lefebvre, 2012. For additional discus-
sion, see also UNCTAD, 2018a: chap. IV.


19  For example, the Chinese company Huawei devel-
oped its smartphone business by outcompeting main 
incumbent firms not simply through low-cost advan-
tage but by relying on recent scientific knowledge 
and the integration of ensuing new technologies in 
its innovation strategies (Joo et al., 2016). Starting by 
producing low-end phones for the domestic market, 
its continued focus on local R&D and reverse engi-
neering of foreign technology allowed it to become 
a global leader in telecommunications networks by 
2012 (Kang, 2015).


20  For a succinct discussion of how intellectual property 
law affects 3D-printing see, for example, Malaty and 
Rostama (2017). For more detailed discussion see, 
for  example, Osborn  (2016: 270) who concludes: 
“perhaps the innovations most impacted by 3D print-
ing should be removed from certain IP protections 
altogether. This argument is perhaps strongest in pat-
ent law, where the utilitarian nature of the inventions 
urges their introduction into the public domain”.


21  For detailed discussion, see the literature on “two-
sided markets”. There  is  no  accepted  definition 
of “two-sided markets”, but digital platform busi-
nesses  are  generally  considered  a  crucial  element 
that makes a market  two-sided (see, e.g. Rysman, 
2009; Gürkaynak et al., 2017), as  these platforms 
have two distinct user groups that offer each other 
network benefits.


22  For example, iPad and Amazon’s Kindle although 
competitors, collaborated and Amazon developed a 
Kindle Reader app for iPads, which Apple approved. 
Consumers can now read e-books they purchase on 
Amazon on either a Kindle Reader or iPad, which 


eliminates any competition from small application
developers and drives them out of the ecosystem.


23  For example, in 2016 the European Union announced 
the  antitrust  case  against Alphabet  for  impos-
ing  licensing  conditions  for  the Android OS  that 
favoured Google’s products and apps for its rivals, 
making  it  difficult  for  other  operators  to  develop 
alternative operating systems.


24 See TDR 2017. Lynn,  2017,  provides  an  account 
of this shift  in the United States, with a divergent 
view in Atkinson and Lind, 2018. For more general 
discussion see, e.g. Khan, 2017; and Vezzoso, 2016.


25  See,  for  example,  the  Human  Rights  Council 
HRC Resolution 34/7 adopted on 23 March 2017, 
http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_
id=28120; and the European Union’s General Data 
Protection Regulation  (https://www.eugdpr.org/), 
which entered into force on 25 May 2018, requir-
ing firms to give customers more control over their 
online  information, and may be an  important first 
step towards a better understanding of how compa-
nies themselves value data.


26  Davies et al., 2018, provide an account of the eco-
nomic size of tax avoidance through tax havens.


27  For further discussion, see also TDR 2017: chap. VI.
28  One policy problem that this business model poses is 


difficulty in identifying when a market price is below 
cost, i.e. a criterion required to establish a case of 
predatory pricing on which established competition 
policy could act.


29  See https://autoriteitpersoonsgegevens.nl/en/news/
canadian-and-dutch-data-privacy-guardians-release-
findings-investigation-popular-mobile-app.


30 European Commission: Statement by Commissioner
Vestager  on Commission  decision  to fine Google 
€2.42  billion  for  abusing  dominance  as  search 
engine by giving illegal advantage to its own com-
parison shopping service (see http://europa.eu/rapid/
press-release_STATEMENT-17-1806_en.htm).


31  As further discussed in TDR 2017, a starting point for 
any such policies might be the Set of Multilaterally 
Agreed  Equitable  Principles  and Rules  for  the 
Control  of Restrictive Business Practices  adopted 
by the United Nations General Assembly in 1980. 
Available  at:  http://unctad.org/en/docs/tdrbpcon-
f10r2.en.pdf.


32  The European Union’s  new data  protection  laws 
provide a case in point.


33  See UNCTAD, 2018b,  for  detailed  discussion on 
importance of data in the digital economy.


34  Available  at:  http://statistics.gov.rw/publication/
rwanda-national-data-revolution-and-big-data.


35  Proposal  in TiSA,  art.  2.2, Annex  on Electronic 
Commerce, undated (November 2016). See Kelsey, 
2018.


36  United States and European Union proposals – US, 
JOB/GC/94; and para. 20, JOB/GC/97.


37  https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kikuu-
quietly-positioning-itself-to-become-africas-first-
mobile-commerce-unicorn-300358163.html.




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


99


Alford T and Morton G (2009). The economics of cloud 
computing  analyzed: Addressing  the  benefits  of 
infrastructure in the cloud. Available at: http://tedal-
ford.sys-con.com/node/1147473.


Atkinson RD  and Lind M  (2018). Commentary: Who 
wins after U.S. antitrust  regulators attack? China. 
Available  at:  http://fortune.com/2018/03/29/com-
mentary-who-wins-after-u-s-antitrust-regulators-
attack-china/.


Baldwin R (2016). The Great Convergence: Information
Technology and the New Globalization. Harvard 
University Press. Cambridge, MA.


Baldwin R and Lopez-Gonzalez J (2013). Supply-chain 
trade: A portrait of global patterns and several test-
able hypotheses. Working Paper No. 18957. National 
Bureau of Economic Research.


Basiliere P  (2017). Gartner  predicts  2018:  3D Printing 
changes business models. Available at: https://blogs.
gartner.com/pete-basiliere/2017/12/12/gartner-pre-
dicts-2018–3d-printing-changes-business-models/.


Bauer M, Ferracane MF  and  van  der Marel E  (2016). 
Tracing  the  economic  impact  of  regulations  on 
the free flow of data and data localization. Global 
Commission on Internet Governance Paper Series 
No.  30. Available  at:  https://www.cigionline.org/
publications/tracing-economic-impact-regulations-
free-flow-data-and-data-localization.


Bessen JE (2016). Accounting for rising corporate profits: 
Intangibles or regulatory rents? Law and Econom-
ics Working Paper No.  16–18. Boston University 
School  of Law. Available  at:  https://www.bu.edu/
law/files/2016/11/Accounting-for-Rising-Corporate-
Profits.pdf.


Brynjolfsson E, Eggers F  and Gannamaneni A  (2018). 
Using massive online choice experiments to measure 
changes in well-being. Working Paper No. 24514. 
National Bureau of Economic Research.


Bukht R and Heeks R (2017). Defining, conceptualising 
and measuring  the digital economy. Development 
Informatics Working Paper No. 68. Global Develop-
ment Institute. University of Manchester.


Chang H-J and Andreoni A (2016). Industrial policy in a 
changing world: Basic principles, neglected issues 
and  new  challenges. Cambridge  Journal  of Eco-
nomics  40Years Conference. Available  at:  http://
www.cpes.org.uk/dev/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/
Chang_Andreoni_2016_Industrial-Policy.pdf.


Chenery H and Syrquin M (1975). Patterns of Develop-
ment 1950–70. Oxford University Press. Oxford.


Cornell University,  INSEAD  and WIPO  (2017). The
Global Innovation Index 2017: Innovation Feeding
the World. Ithaca, Fontainebleau and Geneva.


Davies RB, Martin  J,  Parenti M and Toubal F  (2018). 
Knocking on tax haven’s door: Multinational firms 
and transfer pricing. The Review of Economics and
Statistics. 100(1): 120–134.


References
De Backer K and Flaig D  (2017). The  future of  global 


value chains: Business as usual or “a new normal”? 
Science, Technology and  Innovation Policy Papers 
No. 41. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and 
Development. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/
d8da8760-en.


De Marchi V, Giuliani E and Rabellotti R (2018). Do global 
value chains offer developing countries learning and 
innovation opportunities? The European Journal of
Development Research. 30(3): 389–407. 


de Vries GJ (2018). Global value chain and domestic value 
added export analysis using the World Input-Output 
Database: Methods and an illustration. Background 
material prepared for the Trade and Development
Report 2018.


de Vries GJ, Miroudot S and Timmer MP (2018). Func-
tional specialization in international trade: An explo-
ration  based  on  occupations  of workers. Mimeo. 
University of Groningen.


Edmans A (2014). Blockholders and corporate governance. 
Annual Review of Financial Economies. 6(1): 23–50.


Elder J (2013). Review of policy measures to stimulate 
private demand for innovation: Concepts and effects. 
National Endowment for Science, Technology and 
the Arts Working  Paper No.  13/13. Manchester 
Institute of Innovation Research. Available at: https://
www.nesta.org.uk/report/review-of-policy-meas-
ures-to-stimulate-private-demand-for-innovation-
concepts-and-effects/.


Ernst  and Young  (2016). How will  3D  printing make 
your company the strongest link in the value chain? 
EY’s  global  3D  printing  report  2016. Available 
at:http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/
EY-3d-druck-studie-executive-summary/$FILE/
ey-how-will-3d-printing-make-your-company-the-
strongest-link-in-the-value-chain.pdf.


Eurofound (2018). Game Changing Technologies: Exploring
the Impact on Production Processes and Work. Publi-
cations Office of the European Union. Luxembourg.


Ezrachi A and Stucke ME (2016). Virtual Competition: The
Promise and Perils of the Algorithm-Driven Economy. 
Harvard University Press. Cambridge, MA.


Ferrari A  (2012). Digital Competence in Practice: An
Analysis of Frameworks.  European Commission. 
Joint Research Centre.  Institute  for  Prospective 
Technological Studies. Seville. Available at: http://
dx.doi.org/10.2791/82116.


Filitz  R, Henkel  J  and Tether  BS  (2015).  Protecting 
aesthetic  innovations? An  exploration  of  the  use 
of registered community designs. Research Policy. 
44(6): 1192–1206.


Foroohar R  (2017). Release  big  tech’s  grip  on  power. 
Financial Times. 18 June.


Foster C and Graham M (2017). Reconsidering the role 
of the digital in global production networks. Global
Networks. 17(1): 68–88.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


100


Foster C and Heeks R  (2014). Nurturing user-producer 
interaction:  Inclusive  innovation  flows  in  a  low-
income mobile  phone market.  Innovation and
Development. 4(2): 221–237.


Foster C, Graham M, Mann L, Waema T and Friederici N 
(2018). Digital control in value chains: Challenges 
of  connectivity  for East African firms. Economic
Geography. 94(1): 68–86.


Foster JB and McChesney RW (2011). The Internet’s unho-
ly marriage to capitalism. Monthly Review. March. 
Available at: https://monthlyreview.org/2011/03/01/
the-internets-unholy-marriage-to-capitalism/.


Fu X, Pietrobelli C and Soete L (2011). The role of for-
eign  technology and  indigenous  innovation  in  the 
emerging  economies: Technological  change  and 
catching-up. World Development. 39(7): 1204–1212.


Gehl Sampath P (2018). Regulating the digital economy: 
Are we moving towards a ‘win-win’ or a ‘lose-lose’? 
Working Paper No. 5. United Nations University. 
Maastricht Economic and social Research institute 
on Innovation and Technology. 


Graef  I  (2015). Market definition and market power  in 
data: The case of online platforms. World Competi-
tion. 38(4): 473–505.


Gürkaynak G, İnanılır Ö, Diniz S and Yaşar AG (2017). 
Multisided markets  and  the challenge of  incorpo-
rating multisided  considerations  into  competition 
law  analysis.  Journal of Antitrust Enforcement. 
5(1): 100–129.


Haskel J and Westlake S (2018). Capitalism without Capi-
tal: The Rise of the Intangible Economy. Princeton 
University Press. Princeton, NJ.


Helleiner G (2000). Markets, politics and globalization: 
Can  the global economy be civilized? Tenth Raúl 
Prebisch Lecture. 11 December. UNCTAD. Geneva. 
Available at http://unctad.org/en/Docs/prebisch10th.
en.pdf Hill R  (2017).  Second  contribution  to  the 
June–September  2017 Open Consultation  of  the 
ITU CWG-Internet: Why should data flow freely?. 
Available at: www.apig.ch/CWG-Internet%202017-
2bis.pdf.


Hopkins TK and Wallerstein I (1986). Commodity chains 
in the world economy prior to 1800. Review (Fer-
nand Braudel Center). 10(1): 157–170.


Hymer S (1972). The internationalization of capital. Jour-
nal of Economic Issues. 6(1): 91–111.


ICRICT  (Independent Commission  for  the Reform of 
International Corporate Taxation) (2018). A roadmap 
to improve rules for taxing multinationals: A fairer 
future  for  global  taxation. February. Available  at: 
https://www.world-psi.org/sites/default/files/attach-
ment/news/icrictunitarytaxationengfeb2018.pdf.


ILO (2018, forthcoming). Robotics and Reshoring. Inter-
national Labour Organization. Geneva.


ILO-ITU (2017). Digital skills for decent jobs for youth 
campaign  to  train  5 million youth with  job-ready 
digital skills. International Labour Organization and 
International Telecommunication Union. Available 


at: https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Digital-Inclusion/
Youth-and-Children/Pages/Digital-Skills.aspx


IMF (2018). Measuring the digital economy. International 
Monetary  Fund. Washington, D.C. Available  at: 
http://www.imf.org/en/Publications/Policy-Papers/
Issues/2018/04/03/022818-measuring-the-digital-
economy.


Immelt JR, Govindarajan V and Trimble C (2009). How 
GE is disrupting itself. Harvard Business Review. 
October: 56–65.


Joo SH, Oh C and Lee K (2016). Catch-up strategy of an 
emerging firm in an emerging country: Analysing 
the case of Huawei vs. Ericsson with patent data. 
International Journal of Technology Management. 
72(1/2/3): 19–42.


Kang B (2015). The innovation process of Huawei and 
ZTE: Patent data analysis. China Economic Review. 
36: 378–393.


Kelsey J (2018). How a TPP-style E-commerce outcome 
in  the WTO would  endanger  the  development 
dimension of the GATS acquis (and potentially the 
WTO).  Journal of International Economic Law. 
21(2): 273–295.


Khan LM (2017). Amazon’s antitrust paradox. Yale Law
Journal. 126(3): 710–805.


Kowalski P, Rabaioli D and Vallejo S (2017). International 
technology transfer measures in an interconnected 
world:  Lessons  and  policy  implications. OECD 
Trade Policy Papers No.  206. OECD Publishing. 
Paris. Available  at:  https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/
trade/international-technology-transfer-measures-
in-an-interconnected-world_ada51ec0-en.


Kozul-Wright R and Poon D (2017). Learning from China’s 
industrial strategy. Project Syndicate. 28 April. Avail-
able at: https://www.project-syndicate.org/commen-
tary/china-industrial-strategy-lessons-by-richard-
kozul-wright-and-daniel-poon-2017-04?barrier= 
accesspaylog.


Laperche B and Lefebvre G (2012). The globalization of 
Research & Development in industrial corporations: 
Towards “reverse innovation”? The cases of General 
Electric and Renault. Journal of Innovation Econom-
ics & Management. 10(2): 53–79.


Leliveld A  and Knorringa P  (2018).  Frugal  innovation 
and development research. The European Journal
of Development Research. 30(1): 1–16.


Lewis HD (1881). The story of a great monopoly. The Atlan-
tic. March. Available  at:  https://www.theatlantic.
com/magazine/archive/1881/03/the-story-of-a-
great-monopoly/306019/.


Luo S, Lovely ME and Popp D (2017). Intellectual return-
ees as drivers of indigenous innovation: Evidence 
from the Chinese photovoltaic industry. The World
Economy. 40(11): 2424–2454.


Lynn BC  (2017). The  consumer welfare  standard  in 
antitrust: Outdated or a harbor  in a  sea of doubt? 
Testimony before the Senate Committee on the
Judiciary: Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition, 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN A DIGITAL WORLD: PROSPECTS, PITFALLS AND POLICY OPTIONS


101


and Consumer Rights. Available  at:  https://www.
judiciary.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/12-13-17%20
Lynn%20Testimony.pdf.


Malaty E and Rostama G (2017). 3D printing and IP law. 
WIPO Magazine. February. Available at: http://www.
wipo.int/wipo_magazine/en/2017/01/article_0006.
html.


Markusen JR (2013). Putting per-capita income back into 
trade  theory. Journal of International Economics. 
90(2): 255–265.


Mazzucato M (2017). Mission-oriented innovation policy: 
Challenges and opportunities. Institute for Innova-
tion and Public Purpose. University College London. 
Available  at:  https://www.thersa.org/globalassets/
pdfs/reports/mission-oriented-policy-innovation-
report.pdf.


Midler C, Jullien B and Lung Y (2017). Rethinking Innova-
tion and Design for Emerging Markets: Inside the
Renault Kwid Project. CRC Press. Boca Raton, FL.


Milberg W and Winkler D (2013). Outsourcing Econom-
ics: Global Value Chains in Capitalist Development. 
Cambridge University Press. Cambridge.


Negroponte, N  (1995). Being Digital. Vintage Books. 
New York, NY.


Newman C, Rand J, Talbot T and Tarp F (2015). Technol-
ogy transfers, foreign investment and productivity 
spillovers. European Economic Review. 76:168–187.


Osborn L (2016). 3D printing and intellectual property. In: 
Olleros FX and Zhegu M, eds. Research Handbook
on Digital Transformations. Edward Elgar Publish-
ing. Cheltenham: 254–271.


Pérez C (2010). Technological dynamism and social inclu-
sion in Latin America: A resource-based production 
development strategy. CEPAL Review. 100: 121–141.


Pérez C and Marín A (2015). Technological change and 
sustainable development in a world of opportunities
for the region. Available at: http://www19.iadb.org/
intal/icom/en/notas/39-6/.


Prebisch R (1949). Introduction: The economic develop-
ment of Latin America and its principal problems. 
Economic Survey of Latin America 1948. ECLA. 
Santiago: xvii–xx.


Prebisch R (1986). Address delivered at the twenty-first 
session of ECLAC, Mexico City, 24 April. CEPAL
Review. 29: 13−16.


Purdy M and Daugherty P (2017). How AI boosts industry 
profits and innovation. Accenture. Available at: https://
www.accenture.com/t20171005T065812Z__w__/
us-en/_acnmedia/Accenture/next-gen-5/insight-
ai-industry-growth/pdf/Accenture-AI-Industry-
Growth-Full-Report.pdfla=en?la=en.


Rodrik D (2015). From welfare state to innovation state. 
Project Syndicate. Available at: https://www.project-
syndicate.org/commentary/labor-saving-technology-
by-dani-rodrik-2015-01.


Rodrik D (2018). What do  trade agreements  really do? 
Journal of Economic Perspectives. 32(2): 73–90.


Rysman M (2009). The economics of two-sided markets. 
Journal of Economic Perspectives. 23(3): 125–143.


Salazar-Xirinachs  JM, Nübler  I  and Kozul-Wright R 
(2014).  Introduction.  In:  Salazar-Xirinachs  JM, 
Nübler  I  and Kozul-Wright  R,  eds. Transform-
ing Economies: Making Industrial Policy Work
for Growth, Jobs and Development.  International 
Labour Office. Geneva: 1–38.


Santiago F and Weiss M (2018). Demand-driven policy 
interventions to foster sustainable and inclusive
industrial  development  in  developing  countries. 
Inclusive and Sustainable  Industrial Development 
Working Paper No.  17. United Nations  Industrial 
Development Organization.


Saviotti PP and Pyka A (2013). The co-evolution of innova-
tion, demand and growth. Economics of Innovation
and New Technology. 22(5): 461–482.


Schwartz PM and Solove DJ  (2011). The PII problem: 
Privacy and a new concept of personally  identifi-
able information. New York University Law Review. 
86(6):1814–1894. Available at: https://scholarship.
law.berkeley.edu/facpubs/1638/.


Singh PJ  (2017). Digital  industrialisation  in  develop-
ing countries: A review of the business and policy 
landscape. Available  at:  http://www.itforchange.
net/sites/default/files/1468/digital_industrialisa-
tion_in_developing_countries.pdf.


Storm S  and Kohler P  (2016). CETA without  blinders: 
How  cutting  “trade  costs  and more” will  cause 
unemployment, inequality and welfare losses. Global 
Development  and Environment  Institute Working 
Paper No. 16-03. Tufts University. Medford, MA.


Tarnoff B  (2018). Big  data  for  the  people:  It’s  time  to 
take it back from our tech overlords. The Guardian. 
14 March. Available  at:  https://www.theguardian.
com/technology/2018/mar/14/tech-big-data-capi-
talism-give-wealth-back-to-people.


Temin P (2017). The Vanishing Middle Class: Prejudice
and Power in a Dual Economy. MIT Press. Cam-
bridge, MA.


Tørsløv TR, Wier LS and Zucman G (2018). The miss-
ing profits  of  nations. Working Paper No.  24701. 
National Bureau of Economic Research.


Turner A (2018). Capitalism in the age of robots: Work, 
income and wealth  in  the 21st-century. Lecture at 
School of Advanced International Studies. 10 April. 
Johns Hopkins University. Washington, D.C. Avail-
able  at:  https://www.ineteconomics.org/research/
research-papers/capitalism-in-the-age-of-robots-
work-income-and-wealth-in-the-21st-century.


Ubhaykar R (2015). The emerging world of 3D printing. 
Outlook Business.  6 March. Available  at:  https://
www.outlookbusiness.com/the-big-story/lead-story/
the-emerging-world-of-3d-printing-590.


UNCTAD (2017a). World Investment Report 2017: Invest-
ment and the Digital Economy (United Nations
publication. Sales No. E.17.II.D.3. New York and 
Geneva).




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


102


UNCTAD  (2017b). The  “new”  digital  economy  and 
development. UNCTAD Technical Notes on  Infor-
mation and Communications Technology for Devel-
opment No.  8. Available  at:  http://unctad.org/en/
PublicationsLibrary/tn_unctad_ict4d08_en.pdf.


UNCTAD  (2017c). Rising Product Digitalisation and
Losing Trade Competitiveness. UNCTAD/GDS/
ECIDC/2017/3. New York and Geneva.


UNCTAD (2017d). Information Economy Report, 2017:
Digitalization, Trade and Development (United
Nations  publication.  Sales No.E.17.II.D.8. New 
York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (2018a). Technology and Innovation Report:
Harnessing Frontier Technologies for Sustainable
Development (United Nations publication. Sales No. 
E.18.II.D.3. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD  (2018b). South–South Digital Cooperation:
A Regional Integration Agenda. UNCTAD/GDS/
ECIDC/2018/1. New York and Geneva.


UNCTAD (TDR 2002). Trade and Development Report,
2002: Global Trends and Prospects, Developing
Countries in World Trade (United Nations publica-
tion. Sales No. E.02.II.D.2. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2008). Trade and Development Report,
2008: Commodity Prices, Capital Flows and the
Financing of Investment (United Nations publica-
tion. Sales No. E.08.II.D.21. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2014). Trade and Development Report,
2014: Global Governance and Policy Space for
Development  (United Nations  publication.  Sales 
No. E.14.II.D.4. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2016). Trade and Development Report,
2016: Structural Transformation for Inclusive and
Sustained Growth (United Nations publication. Sales 
No. E.16.II.D.5. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2017). Trade and Development Report,
2017: Beyond Austerity: Towards a Global New Deal
(United Nations publication. Sales No. E.17.II.D.5. 
New York and Geneva).


United Nations and ECLAC (2018). Data, Algorithms and
Policies: Redefining the Digital World. Economic 
Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. 
Santiago (LC/CMSI.6/4).


USTR (Office of the United States Trade Representative) 
(2016). Request  for  public  comments  to  compile 
the National  Trade  Estimate  Report  (NTE)  on 
foreign  trade  barriers.  Federal Register.  19  July. 
Available at: https://www.federalregister.gov/docu-
ments/2016/07/19/2016-16985/request-for-public-
comments-to-compile-the-national-trade-estimate-
report-on-foreign-trade-barriers.


Van Alstyne MW, Parker GG and Choudary SP (2016). 
Pipelines, platforms, and the new rules of strategy. 
Harvard Business Review. 94(4): 54–60.


Vernon R  (1966).  International  investment and  interna-
tional trade in the product cycle. Quarterly Journal
of Economics. 80(2): 190–207.


Vezzoso S (2016). Competition policy in a world of big 
data.  In: Olleros FX and Zhegu M, eds. Research
Handbook on Digital Transformations.  Edward 
Elgar Publishing. Cheltenham: 400–420.


Vijayabaskar M  and Suresh Babu M  (2014). Building 
capabilities in the software service industry in India:
Skill formation and learning of domestic enterprises 
in value chains. In: Salazar-Xirinachs JM, Nübler I 
and Kozul-Wright R, eds. Transforming Economies.:
Making Industrial Policy Work for Growth, Jobs and
Development. International Labour Office. Geneva: 
239–266.


von Zedtwitz M, Corsi S, Søberg PV and Frega R (2015). 
A typology of reverse innovation. Journal of Product
Innovation Management. 32(1): 12–28.


Warren E  (2017). America’s monopoly moment: Work, 
innovation,  and control  in  an age of  concentrated 
power. Speech, 6 December. Open Market Institute. 
Washington, D.C. Available at: https://openmarket-
sinstitute.org/events/americas-monopoly-moment-
work-innovation-and-control-in-an-age-of-concen-
trated-power/.


WEF (2015). Deep Shift: Technology Tipping Points and
Societal Impact. World Economic Forum. Available 
at: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GAC15_
Technological_Tipping_Points_report_2015.pdf.


WIPO (2017). World Intellectual Property Report 2017:
Intangible Capital in Global Value Chains. World 
Intellectual Property Organization. Geneva.


World Bank, IDE-JETRO (Institute of Developing Econo-
mies,  Japan External Trade Organization), OECD 
(Organisation  for  Economic  Co-operation  and 
Development), UIBE  (University  of  International 
Business and Economics) and WTO (World Trade 
Organization) (2017). Global Value Chain Develop-
ment Report 2017: Measuring and Analyzing the
Impact of GVCs on Economic Development. World
Bank. Washington, D.C.


Wunsch-Vincent S (2006). The Internet, cross-border trade 
in services, and the GATS: Lessons from US–Gam-
bling. World Trade Review. 5(3): 319–355.


Zeschky MB, Winterhalter S  and Gassmann O  (2014). 
From cost to frugal and reverse innovation: Mapping 
the field and implications for global competitiveness. 
Research-Technology Management. 57(4): 20–27.




103


BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES:
INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND
STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION IV


The  last chapter  recognized  that building a digital 
infrastructure has  to be a key part of  any  strategy 
to  help  developing  countries  grasp  the  benefits  of 
emerging digital technologies. It also suggested that 
the  strong  scale  and network  effects  exhibited by 
that  infrastructure can give  rise  to  economic  rents 
and warned  that  leaving  its provision  to corporate 
interests rather than giving a lead role to public policy 
would probably skew outcomes in ways that would 
be neither inclusive nor sustainable, particularly in 
developing countries.


This concern reflects an older and wider discussion 
on the link between infrastructure and development. 
There is consensus among economists and economic 
historians that infrastructure has often been at the cen-
tre of the transformative shifts in the economy over
the last 250 years, beginning with the canal network 
in Britain as its industrial revolution got under way. 
There  is  also broad agreement  that many of  these 
capital-intensive infrastructure projects – highways, 
airports, harbours, utility distribution systems, rail-
ways, water and sewer systems, tele communication 
systems,  etc.  –  have  exhibited  scale  and  network 
effects that engage both the public and private sectors 
in a variety of complicated financial, economic and 
political interactions. What is less clear is the best 
way to manage those interactions, the precise chan-
nels through which large infrastructure projects can 
help  generate  sustained development, whether  the 
benefits derived match the costs incurred and, per-
haps most difficult, whether those benefits and costs 
are shared in ways that generate inclusive outcomes.


In the face of such uncertainty, it is not surprising that 
numerous growth accounting exercises have  failed 
to generate conclusive econometric results from the 
introduction of infrastructure variables, while myriad 
case studies have pointed to a disconnect between the


microeconomic performance of infrastructure projects 
and their macroeconomic promise (see box 4.1). Nor is 
it surprising to find that many successful infrastructure 
programmes were as much  the product of political 
ambition – “bold endeavours” as Felix Rohatyn (2009) 
put it – as careful public accounting and cold statistical 
calculation. Indeed, Albert Hirschman, in his seminal 
study titled The Strategy of Economic Development
published exactly 60 years ago, was right in describ-
ing  large-scale  infrastructure planning  as  “a matter 
of faith in the development potential of a country or
region” (1985: 84).


On that metric, the Washington Consensus, which has 
shaped much development policy thinking over the 
last 40 years, has shown little faith in the potential of 
developing countries. Infrastructure lending by the 
World Bank, which was its original rationale, dropped 
precipitously  beginning  in  the  1970s,  as  its  focus 
shifted to other forms of lending that concentrated on 
economic adjustment measures, good governance and 
social safety nets, rather than building infrastructure. 
However, this trend has been reversed in recent years 
(see figure 4.1).


The revival of  interest  in  infrastructure reflects,  in 
part, a growing acceptance in many advanced econo-
mies, since the 2008 financial crisis, given that such 
spending  can  have  positive  short-  and  long-term 
impacts on growth and, therefore, an important role 
in  tackling secular stagnation  (Summers, 2016).  It 
is  also  a  recognition  of  the  central  role  that  large 
infrastructure projects have played in the remarkable 
growth and poverty-reduction story that has unfolded 
in China. Indeed, the high ranking of China (relative 
to its income level) in the McKinsey Connectedness 
Index seems to indicate the faith placed by its leader-
ship on infrastructure-led growth, including building 
a strategic advantage in the emerging digital economy 


A. Introduction




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


104


BOX 4.1 What do empirical studies tell us?


Aschauer’s  influential work  (1989)  found  evidence  for  the widely  accepted wisdom  that  “roads  lead  to 
prosperity” (see also Deng, 2013). Looking at the economy of the United States from 1948 to 1985, he concluded 
that infrastructure investments led to productivity increases, finding that a 10 per cent rise in infrastructure stock 
over time was associated with a 4 per cent increase in productivity. The study even showed that the converse 
also held: declining infrastructure investment from 1970 to 1985 was responsible for declining output per capita 
over the same period in the United States. These findings triggered a spurt of empirical research examining 
the contribution of infrastructure to growth. One strand has looked at the effects of aggregate infrastructure 
stocks and service flows on per capita GDP. This includes a majority of the macroeconomic studies, which 
look at expansion paths of per capita sectoral stocks with per capita GDP, thereby identifying countries that 
are outliers in terms of infrastructure investments in middle- and low-income regions (Ingram and Fay, 2008). 
Another strand has examined the effects of specific kinds of infrastructure interventions on growth and poverty 
reduction, usually focusing on particular geographical areas, enterprises or sectors (Straub, 2008).


However, there is still a lot of ambiguity on both conceptual and empirical fronts (see Estache, 2006; Estache 
and Garsous, 2012; Bom and Ligthart, 2014). The theoretical framework linking infrastructure and growth 
remains weak; and as Straub (2008) notes, a majority of the studies lack a clear hypothesis to be tested. As a 
result, although several studies after Aschauer (1989, 1990) focused on questioning the cause–effect relationship 
between infrastructure stocks and growth (see Gramlich, 1994), and the question of spurious correlations due to 
non-stationarity of data or missing variables (Holtz-Eakin, 1994), there is still a great deal of controversy on the 
direction and magnitude of the growth-enhancing effects of infrastructure (see Lakshmanan, 2011; Deng, 2013).


Empirically, the first critical issue is the measurement of infrastructure itself, as there continues to be no unified 
definition of the term (Cassis et al., 2016). Many studies measure infrastructure in terms of an investment flow or 
stock (public capital), or a single physical asset (Calderón and Servén, 2010; Lakshmanan, 2011; Deng, 2013), 
and consider the impact of one or the other kinds of infrastructure on growth (water, electricity, transport, or 
a combination thereof). But given that infrastructure investments are relatively heterogeneous in nature, and 
some forms of infrastructure (roads and telecommunications) have a greater impact on productivity than others 
(such as airlines), the scope of the study becomes an important issue in assessing findings and their relevance 
to the wider debate (Bröcker and Rietveld, 2009; Melo et al., 2013). Furthermore, macro- and microstudies 
often result in contradictory findings. This is because the most direct impacts of infrastructure on growth are 
obtained at the province or state level where network effects of infrastructure investments and indirect benefits 
are most evident, whereas in some cases, at the macro level expansion of infrastructure has been found to be 
associated with lower growth, for reasons that are not well explored.


A second issue that affects empirical comparisons relates to inadequacies in the data on infrastructure (Elburz 
et al., 2017). Infrastructure is a result of both public and private investment, with private investment ranging 
between 25 per cent to 70 per cent of total infrastructure investment in different countries. But since data on 
infrastructure are scant and typically do not provide a comprehensive total of private and public investments, 
public infrastructure is used as a proxy in a large number of studies, thereby potentially leading to undercounting 
of total infrastructure stocks of countries in existing empirical analyses. This problem is exacerbated by the 
fact that many countries have not maintained reliable public infrastructure investment figures until recently, 
which creates issues around comparability.


Third, infrastructure stock figures might not really convey the level of services offered, because there can be 
large differences between the quality and quantity of infrastructure services offered (Straub, 2008), especially 
in developing countries. Hence, existing estimates do not capture the efficiency of infrastructure and service 
quality, which is a very important determinant of growth.


In a widely accepted study, Calderón et al. (2011) estimated that a 10 per cent rise in infrastructure assets can 
directly account for an increase in GDP per capita of between 0.7 per cent and 1 per cent. But in general, the 
variability in the data used and its relevance to the central question of infrastructure’s impact on growth, the 
model specification, the econometric methodology and the treatment of non-stationarity and causation, are all 
causes for inconclusive results. These data difficulties also make it hard to arrive at methodologies to compare 
and contrast the experiences of countries in promoting growth through increases in stock in infrastructure. 
Straub (2008: 22) reviewed 64 empirical studies linking infrastructure to growth to find that very few of them 
actually addressed the question directly and systematically.




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


105


(Woetzel et al., 2017). Many other developing coun-
tries are keen to understand how China managed this 
process and to replicate its success.


Multilateral financial institutions, including new insti-
tutions from the South such as the Asian Infrastructure 
Investment Bank and the New Development Bank, 
have  begun  scaling  up  support  for  infrastructure 
investment in developing countries. There are also 
several  international  initiatives  –  such  as  the Belt 
and Road Initiative in China and the (much smaller) 
infrastructure plan for Africa from Germany – that 
have put  infrastructure investments at  their centre. 
Meanwhile, international institutional investors, ever 
on the lookout to strengthen their financial portfolios, 
seem keen on infrastructure as an asset class, since it 
offers a steady return on investment profile. All this 
chimes well with  the  2030 Development Agenda, 
constructed around a series of ambitious goals and 
targets, which together add up to a massive infrastruc-
ture programme on a global scale; the Addis Ababa 
Action Agenda agreed at the Third United Nations 
Conference on Financing for Development in 2015, 
has reinforced this ambition.


But even as more resources have been made available 
for infrastructure projects, the scale of the financing 


challenge has, if anything, become more daunting. 
The World Bank has acknowledged this in its call to 
scale up efforts “from billions to trillions” to meet 
the 2030 Agenda and proffered a new framework to 
meet this challenge involving an enhanced role for the 
private sector  through public–private partnerships, 
blending and de-risking techniques. This has focused 
the infrastructure debate on the “bankability” of pro-
jects (discussed in section D). While this focus has, no 
doubt, helped to raise awareness of the infrastructure 
challenge, it misses or, worse, sidelines, some key 
questions  from  a  developing-country  perspective 
beginning with  how  infrastructure  can  actually 
become  a  real  force  for  structural  transformation, 
raising  productivity  across  sectors  and  activities, 
and  creating  a more  virtuous  development  circle. 
Posing  that  question  leads  naturally  to  a  series  of 
related questions that policymakers from developing 
countries have begun to ask:


•  How should they seek to channel new financing 
possibilities in the most effective and sustainable
ways?


•  How should they approach new initiatives com-
ing from specific lead countries (such as the Belt 
and Road Initiative in China) and from regional 
arrangements?


• What are the important considerations to bear in
mind when entering into specific financing deals 
for new infrastructure?


• What are the possible threats and how can they
be avoided?


This chapter addresses the role of infrastructure in
the process of structural transformation as its central
question. It draws, in part, on the framework provided 
by Hirschman to make planning and programming 
activities more  effective,  in  the  face of  the uncer-
tainties,  constraints  and  tensions  inherent  in  the 
development process. Recognizing that development 
planning is a “risky business”, Hirschman stressed 
the importance of sequencing and experimentation 
to establish the right balance between what was then 
commonly called “social overhead capital” (public 
infrastructure) and directly productive activities (pri-
vate investment) (Hirschman, 1958: 83). Beginning 
from  his  description  of  development  strategy  as 
“diversified investment in the general growth of the 
economy rather than growth of one specific activity” 
(Hirschman,  1958:  85),  the  chapter  proposes  that 
crowding in private investment as part of an unbal-
anced  growth  strategy  offers  a  useful  framework 


FIGURE 4.1 Multilateral development banks:
Finance for infrastructure as
proportion of total banks’ finance
(Percentage)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on banks’ annual reports.
Note: Infrastructure includes energy, transportation and telecom-


munications. Values are averages for each decade, based on
banks’ annual commitments from both concessional and non-
concessional windows. World Bank: includes International Bank
for Reconstruction and Development and International Develop-
ment Association only. Inter-American Development Bank: the
1960s are the average over 1967–1969. Asian Development
Bank: based on figures available from 1971.


67.2 64.8


39.8
33.5


26.3 26.2
30.2


0


10


20


30


40


50


60


70


80


1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s


World Bank
Inter-American Development Bank
Asian Development Bank




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


106


within which to consider infrastructure investments
in many of today’s developing countries (Hirschman, 
1958: 93). It seeks to show how public infrastruc-
ture investments can help to break the “interlocking 
vicious circles”  (Hirschman, 1958: 5)  that  impede 
development and to help generate the kind of linkages 
that are key to structural transformation.


Building such linkages is neither an automatic nor 
a  linear  process. The growth  effects  of  infrastruc-
ture depend on where infrastructure investments
take place, and how these investments are planned, 
executed and sequenced. The  links between  infra-
structure and  transformation are best  forged when 
infrastructure projects are clearly designed and placed 
as part of a wider development strategy that recog-
nizes and actively fosters the positive feedback loops 
between  infrastructure,  productivity  and  growth. 
Indeed,  throughout  history  from  the  development 
of Western Europe and the United States up until
the recent cases of successful industrializers of East 
Asia,  infrastructure  development  has  been firmly 


tied to broader strategic objectives and institutional 
changes. These  experiences  provide  an  effective 
counter to the bankability approach, since they show 
that  development  strategies  are  not  best  pursued 
through emphasis on individual projects determined 
solely by criteria of financial viability. The alterna-
tive requires a more holistic approach, that includes 
projects based on developmental criteria, and which 
may not be financially viable in the short run.


The chapter is organized as follows. Section B situ-
ates the discussion on infrastructure and development
by  tracing  it historically, providing a  taxonomy of 
different types of infrastructure and how they can
contribute to a virtuous development circle in the
context of unbalanced growth. Section C maps recent 
estimates of infrastructure needs and raises some
concerns about meeting those needs primarily as a 
question of  the  bankability  of  projects. Section D 
offers  some  elements  for  planning  infrastructure 
investments, which it sees as key to growth promo-
tion. Section E concludes.


B. Infrastructure matters: Conceptual issues and historical lessons


Physical and social  infrastructure has always been 
at  the  centre  of  discussions  in  developing  coun-
tries, beginning with the crude colonial imperative 
of  extracting  and  exporting  natural  resources  at 
minimum  cost,  in  the  commodity-based  value 
chains that developed during the nineteenth century. 
Programmes to achieve minimum standards of nutri-
tion, health and education made a brief appearance 
in the interwar period as a philosophy of “colonial
trusteeship” sought to deflect growing social discon-
tent (Arndt, 1987: 27–29). But it was only during the 
Second World War and the subsequent struggle for 
political independence and local control over natural
resources that a more serious discussion on infra-
structure and development was launched. Given the 
ideological currents of the time, that discussion was 
strongly shaped by an emerging development narra-
tive focused on overcoming “market failures”, seen 
as endemic in infrastructure provision, and requiring 
government  involvement  through  public  utilities 
(power,  telecommunications, water,  etc.),  public 
works (highways, dams, irrigation, etc.) and public 


transport  systems  (railways,  ports,  airports,  etc.). 
Infrastructure was again the focus of attention, but 
from an opposing perspective, in the 1980s, as talk 
of “government failures” accompanied the sharp neo-
liberal policy turn. At that time, privatization became 
the instrument of choice to boost efficiency, along 
with measures to enhance private participation in
infrastructure provision by making it more profitable. 
This included – in a sense coming full circle – tying 
infrastructure  to  the  right business environment  to 
enable participation in global value chains. The 2030 
Agenda has once again broadened the debate with a 
more ambitious infrastructure agenda.


Underpinning all these twists and turns is the abid-
ing question of whether, and if so how, infrastructure 
programmes can help to trigger and sustain a virtu-
ous circle of growth and structural transformation. 
Answering this requires unpacking the term “infra-
structure” to consider the requirements, implications 
and consequences of different types of infrastructure
creation.




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


107


1. Types of infrastructure


Infrastructure encompasses a broad category of goods 
and services that involve investments in both the
social and physical stock of capital. Definitions of 
the term by development economists have been less
than precise (Ingram and Fay, 2008: 301). Hirschman, 
for example, employing  the umbrella  term “social 
overhead  capital”,  defined  infrastructure  as  those 
“basic  services without which primary,  secondary 
and  tertiary  productive  activities  cannot  function” 
(1958:  83),  and  provided  or  heavily  regulated  by 
public  agencies. He  further  distinguished  a  “hard 
core” of transportation and power (characterized by 
technical  indivisibilities  and  a  high  capital–output 
ratio), from a softer group of more traditional public 
goods such as health and education.


The tendency to identify infrastructure with “public
goods”  is  somewhat misleading  (as  the  defining 
characteristics of non-excludable and non-rival
often do not apply)1 but does serve as a reminder of
the tendency to underinvest in their provision, since 
the strong presence of externalities can give rise to 
free-riding  behaviour  and  drive  a wedge  between 
their  social  and private  returns. This  tendency,  as 
Hirschman recognized, is particularly acute in devel-
oping countries. While individual projects associated 
with softer infrastructure are often smaller compared
to harder projects such as in energy or transport, the 
difficulties of excluding some users and their non-
rival nature means they are likely to be provided at 
less than full cost to users. Therefore, they have usu-
ally relied on significant and continuous public sector 
financing. Moreover, while recognizing the potential 
long-term benefits  of  these  types  of  infrastructure 
spending  in  terms of  productivity,  innovation  and 
employment  creation,  it  can  be  difficult  to meas-
ure  these  benefits  in  the  short  term, making  them 
vulnerable  to political expediencies and budgetary 
pressures. This is the case with health and education 
services, particularly in those areas heavily depend-
ent on intangible investments (such as in R&D and 
skills), which may not require large sunk costs but do 
require ongoing investments to maintain and improve 
the services provided.


In many  cases,  however,  infrastructure  services, 
particularly  those  of  the  harder  variety,  are  both 
rivalrous in consumption and excludable in access
and cannot, therefore, be considered as public goods 
in the strict sense. However, externalities persist, and 
other market  failures  complicate  their  delivery.  In 


particular,  significant  scale  economies,  large  sunk 
costs and long gestation periods make for both natural 
monopolies and strong complementarities, whereby 
the effectiveness of investment in one sector depends
on investments in others. This is particularly the case 
where  infrastructure provision  is  closely  linked  to 
networks. These  characteristics  are  found mainly 
in the energy, water, public transport and telecom-
munications sectors, although variations exist within 
sectors, across countries and over time.2 These are, 
moreover,  the  sectors  that  have  traditionally  been 
seen as having a more direct  impact on economic 
growth and structural transformation.


Networked infrastructure services can be delivered 
through hybrid systems with varying degrees of state 
ownership and regulatory oversight. This makes their 
provision a matter of policy choice and contestation. 
In addition,  technological changes have an  impact 
on  the  provision  of  such  infrastructure,  including 
through a shift  to  less capital-intensive  techniques 
and increased competition (Markard, 2011; Torrisi, 
2009; Kasper, 2015).


This  is  certainly  the  case with  the  power  system, 
comprising  energy  generation,  transmission  and 
distribution. Electricity generation has  historically 
relied on conventional fossil fuels and involved large 
centralized power stations. Transmission and distri-
bution are  responsible  for moving electricity  from 
power stations  to users. Promoting such a system, 
from generation to delivery to the end users, requires 
long-term investment in large-scale projects; it also 
involves risks and uncertainty and therefore requires 
detailed planning (Markard, 2011). But its provision 
dramatically increases both economic productivity
and quality of life. In rural areas, access to afford-
able  energy  can  boost  farm productivity  because 
of its uses in pumping water for irrigation, mecha-
nization,  agricultural  processing  and  post-harvest 
storage. Developing a domestic energy industry has 
multiple benefits, because of jobs created in system 
maintenance and repairs, billing and administration, 
and power plant operation and distribution, in addi-
tion to backward linkages and new domestic markets 
(UNCTAD,  2017).  Positive  feedback  effects  are 
created as energy provision supports transportation 
and  information  and  communication  technologies 
(ICTs), which in turn assist in energy generation and 
distribution.


Like  energy,  transportation  infrastructure  (roads, 
railways, airports, seaports, bridges, waterways and 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


108


tramways) calls for large-scale investment projects 
and long gestation periods, although smaller, local-
ized projects with shorter execution periods are also 
possible. The design of transportation systems shapes 
social  transformations,  and  how  populations  and 
businesses settle and interact (NCE, 2014; Atack et 
al., 2010). The choice of transport systems, their scale 
and their spread, matters considerably for structural 
transformation as well as other economic and social
impacts. This is already evident in most developing 
countries, many of which are still dealing with the 
legacy of colonial  choices  in developing  transport 
systems, since these typically emphasized connecting 
the locations of cash-crop production or extraction
of natural resources with towns and ports for export. 
More widely  diffused  transport  connectivity,  by 
contrast, can assist in more broad-based growth. For 
example, in road construction, investing in secondary 
roads in rural areas has been found to have wide-
ranging positive impacts and higher benefit-to-cost 
ratios than investments in highways (United Nations, 
2016). Rural  roads  that  increase  connectivity  for 
rural areas obviously increase access to markets and 
related knowledge; they also have benefits for house-
hold income, poverty reduction and access to health 
care  and  education  (Schweikert  and Chinowsky, 
2012). Efficient  transport  systems can also  reduce 
production costs, alleviating the need to store large 
quantities of material and allowing large and small 
producers to work with just-in-time systems (Nordås 
and Piermartini, 2004).


The  infrastructure  services  dealing  with  water 
provision are  recognized  to be crucial not  just  for 
human welfare but also for economic development. 
Such services and related physical infrastructure
occur at multiple scales and serve urban, industrial, 
agricultural  and  rural  users,  as well  as  involving 
ecological considerations (Global Water Partnership, 
2009). They  include dams and hydropower; water 
supply; wastewater,  sanitation  and water  quality; 
storm water systems; irrigation and drainage; river 
and coastal works; pipelines and canals; and natural 
water  infrastructure  (Grigg,  2017). The  particular 
nature of water as a basic human need, in combina-
tion with  its  amenability  to  being  controlled  and 
monopolized  in  different  circumstances, makes 
public involvement in its provision both necessary
and fraught. While everyone needs “access to safe 
water in adequate quantities for drinking, cooking and 
personal hygiene, and sanitation facilities that do not 
compromise health or dignity” (UN-Water, 2015: 37), 
not everyone gets it. Agriculture depends on irrigation 


that raises crop output and is associated with lower
inequality (United Nations, 2016) and water infra-
structure can reduce vulnerabilities related to food
and energy security. Similarly, water is an essential 
input for manufacturing processes. But distributional 
conflicts – across locations, sectors, income catego-
ries and social groups – loom especially large in the 
case of water, and the manner of its provision can 
raise environmental concerns. Longer-term concerns 
about water overuse and inadequate renewal of fresh
water supplies, as well as water pollution, along with 
the (often unintended) consequences of major water 
infrastructure projects (such as displacement because 
of  dams, waterlogging  and  salinity  through  canal 
networks, inequality of access and so on) mean that 
public involvement in its provision and regulation is 
inevitable even when much of the infrastructure is
privately provided.


An  example  of  the  strong  network  externalities 
associated with infrastructure comes from telecom-
munications  infrastructure, which  includes  fixed 
and mobile  telephony,  radio  and  Internet  systems, 
along with the machinery that enables information 
transmission,  transmission  lines  and  cables.3 This
is an area that has been dominated by private play-
ers,  including network and platform operators and 
technology  and  content  providers,  especially  as 
rapid technological change has enabled favourable 
financial returns (Czarnecki and Dietze, 2017; ADB, 
2017; Henckel and McKibbin, 2010; Serebrisky et 
al.,  2015).  In  addition  to  facilitating  communica-
tions in general, such infrastructure is increasingly 
required by  a wide  range of  activities  in banking, 
trade and production, and has enabled new forms of 
economic activity to emerge. This impact tends to be 
higher where levels of penetration are near universal 
(Estache, 2010: 16), but even where penetration is 
low there can be many positive effects. For example, 
Hjort and Poulsen (2017) report that new submarine 
telecom cables in different parts of Africa brought 
the arrival of fast Internet, leading to the emergence 
of technology start-ups and a manufacturing sector 
that produces Internet-capable devices to serve the
region, an improvement of supply chain coordination 
enhancing productivity in manufacturing and agri-
business, and the creation of jobs in the ICT sector 
and elsewhere. As the industry moves from traditional 
fixed  networks  to  software-based  network  tech-
nologies, the scale of investment has been changing 
rapidly from being predominantly large to including 
smaller-scale  projects  (Deloitte,  2017). However, 
regulatory  requirements  in  this  area  are  complex, 




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


109


involving not just the specification of standards and 
usage limits, but also the prevention of monopolistic 
behaviour, which places often serious demands on 
policymakers in developing countries.


2. Infrastructure and the virtuous circle
of growth


Much of the development policy challenge amounts 
to finding ways to trigger and sustain virtuous circles 
of  increased  resource mobilization,  faster  capital 
formation,  rising  productivity,  better  jobs,  higher 
incomes and expanding markets, both at home and 
abroad,  enabling more  resource mobilization. As 
discussed in TDR 2016,  industrial  development 
and diversification have been key to most sustained 
growth  and development  experiences. As  industry 
–  particularly manufacturing  –  expands,  primary 
activity tends to become more efficient, as a result of 
both increased demand and the provision of capital
and  intermediate  goods,  in  turn  feeding  industrial 
dynamism. The service sector also expands to com-
plement manufacturing activities and, at higher levels 
of income, comes to dominate the economy.


Industrial development was central to Hirschman’s 
idea that developing countries should pursue “unbal-
anced growth” with productive resources targeted at 
a few sectors. This was based on the belief that the 
resulting disruption would not only stimulate further 
private investment in the favoured sectors but would
help promote various organizational and other capa-
bilities whose shortage might otherwise curtail the 
growth  process. The  unbalanced  growth model  is 
based around exploiting scale economies and comple-
mentarities in favoured sectors that can induce more
investment and productivity growth. Those sectors, 
in Hirschman’s framework, have more backward and 
forward linkages; the former referring to provision of 
inputs from other activities and sectors, the latter to 
demand for new activities. The development policy 
challenge is, accordingly, about identifying lead sec-
tors, addressing missing linkages and strengthening 
inter-industry and intersectoral interdependencies to
boost productivity growth.


Hirschman  believed  that  this  framework would 
provide the best guide for the efficient sequencing 
of infrastructure spending, as the shortages revealed 
to the planning authorities would ensure that public 
investments in social overhead capital would comple-
ment those already under way in the private sector, 


thereby further boosting productivity growth. In this 
sequence,  infrastructure would  follow  rather  than 
lead  the  growth  process.  It  is  largely  around  this 
sequencing issue that differences between balanced 
and unbalanced growth strategies emerged in early 
development policy debates (see box 4.2). Despite 
these differences, there was general agreement that 
in most developing countries, investment in general, 
and in infrastructure, in particular, involves a series 
of non-marginal adjustments that are poorly coordi-
nated by markets and for which planning techniques 
of various kinds are desirable.


There are additional ways in which infrastructure
spending  can drive  productivity  and growth. Like 
other  government  spending,  infrastructure  invest-
ment boosts aggregate demand, potentially sparking 
broader-based output growth  through scale econo-
mies which  feed  into  productivity  increases. This 
typically leads to greater private sector investment, 
and  by  extension,  also  raises  private  demand  for 
physical capital over a longer time-horizon (Dissou 
and Didic, 2013). These complementary effects on 
private capital formation tend to be cumulative, as 
infrastructure provision affords greater certainty for 
private industry, and the consequent increased rates 
of capital formation help to crowd in investments in
other sectors of the economy.4 In turn, increased pro-
ductivity and rising incomes lead to higher demand 
for various infrastructure services. In this way infra-
structure investment becomes part of the process of
cumulative causation, whereby industrial expansion 
creates employment, incomes and demand, and leads 
to increased productivity (Myrdal, 1957).


Infrastructure investment can simultaneously address
supply-side constraints and thereby raise the produc-
tivity of other activities (Straub, 2008; Estache and 
Fay, 2009). Insofar as this reduces costs and improves 
the durability of  private  capital  investment,  it  also 
enables the private sector to spend less on maintain-
ing  its  own  capital,  releasing  resources  for  other 
productive investment. Infrastructure provision that 
promotes social  inclusion – such as better housing 
and improvements in health, education, sanitation and 
nutrition – enhances labour productivity in addition to 
promoting social welfare (Serebrisky, 2014). At low 
levels of existing infrastructure, the growth-enhancing 
and social-inclusion effects of new infrastructure
investment tend to be even greater (Straub, 2008).5


Conversely,  low or  insufficient  infrastructure  can 
handicap enterprises by increasing production costs 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


110


BOX 4.2 Balanced versus unbalanced growth


The central issue in the early debates on development policy was how to shift from a resource-dependent to
an industrializing economy with a diversified production structure. Industrialization was understood to be an 
inherently dynamic process, thanks to the presence of increasing returns (both at the firm and sectoral levels), 
complementarities (on both the supply and demand side), learning economies and various other externalities 
that if successfully exploited could drive productivity growth and support job creation.


The problem, recognized by most economists, was that in developing countries these features also introduced 
a  large wedge between  the private and  social  returns  from  investments, making  the market  an  inefficient 
mechanism for mobilizing and allocating  the  required  resources. Accordingly,  the  state would have  to be 
involved in connecting the investment and industrialization processes in developing countries. The question 
was how and where it should make that connection.


For balanced growth theorists such as Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, Ragnar Nurkse and Tibor Scitovsky the major 
constraint on productive investment was on the demand side. Small markets in most developing countries 
produced uncertainty about the expected returns on investment and made it difficult to achieve scale economies, 
thereby choking off the accumulation process and closing down an industrial growth path before it could really 
get started.


The solution outlined by Rosenstein-Rodan (1943) was a coordinated investment programme (which Nurkse 
called “a big push”) across several industries, to guarantee a sufficient level of aggregate demand to make 
those investments viable. In particular, expansion of light industries providing consumer goods seemed the 
most promising option as these could provide local demand for each other’s output; and a large-scale and 
integrated infrastructure programme was seen as the ideal way to break the constraint on self-sustaining growth 
because it would both stimulate local demand and lead to lower production costs (Nurkse, 1953). Moreover, 
complementarities across the investments in electricity generation, transport, communications, etc. implied 
that these too should be organized as an indivisible block if their full benefits were to be realized. The resulting 
development strategy combined centralized infrastructure planning with infant industry protection and, in the 
process, introduced a whole range of new planning techniques (shadow pricing, linear programming, etc.) to 
help manage the subsequent growth trajectory.


Early criticisms of the balanced growth model raised concerns that, given an inelastic supply of factors in 
many developing  countries,  it might  be  prone  to  inflationary  pressures. Also,  its  emphasis  on  consumer 
goods industries seemed to ignore the opportunities for economies of scale in the production of capital and 
intermediate goods and the potential of tapping into export markets (Fleming, 1955; Sheahan, 1958). Still, 


(related  to  transport,  logistics and  storage),  render 
products that would otherwise be competitive as
uncompetitive,  limit  access  to markets  and make 
rural production unprofitable (Escribano and Guasch, 
2005, 2008; Donaldson, 2010; Escribano et al., 2010). 
Indeed, countries that have experienced stalled indus-
trialization or premature deindustrialization (see TDR
2016) have tended to have inconsistent trajectories of 
infrastructure investments, that have been inadequate 
overall and sometimes pulled the economy in other
directions.  In  India,  for  example,  several  studies 
have noted that underinvestment in infrastructure
required  for manufacturing  sector  (Ghosh,  2012; 
Simon and Natarajan, 2017) has constrained private 
investment. By contrast, the rise of information tech-
nology services and digital products was possible in 
India because the conditions for the expansion of
telecommunications and broadband networks were 
relatively less costly for the government to deliver 


on a wide scale  (Douhan and Nordberg, 2007).  In 
several natural resource-rich developing countries, 
infrastructure investments have pulled the economy
in the direction of resource extraction, at the expense 
of other productive activity.


The resulting infrastructure gaps then become con-
straints on supply. For example, Mesquita Moreira 
et  al.  (2013)  found  that  high  transportation  costs 
were  associated with  falling  exports  in Chile  and 
Peru, while Escribano et al. (2010: 8) showed that 
poor infrastructure in Africa increased transport and 
energy costs for local firms, with severe consequences 
for manufacturing productivity and competitiveness. 
Allcott  et  al.  (2016)  found  that  power  shortages 
reduced Indian manufacturing revenues and producer 
surpluses  by  almost  10  per  cent. When  countries 
have adequate electricity provision with few or no
power outages, producers do not need to have costly 




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


111


backup generators. Power outages are a particularly 
acute problem in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, 
as indicated in figure 4.2 by the average number of 
outages  suffered by firms  in  a month.  It  has  been 
estimated for sub-Saharan Africa alone that continu-
ous energy supply would accelerate growth by two 
percentage points per year.6


In what  follows, we  consider whether  unbalanced 
growth through infrastructure investments can really 
help countries to move to a strong growth trajectory. 
The historical experiences considered below suggest 
that they were certainly significant in many success 
stories. However, even within a framework of unbal-
anced growth, there are at least two additional issues 
to keep in mind (Myrdal, 1970). First, some of the 
supply-side limitations that are common in many
developing countries, such as scarcity of skills or the 
absence of the institutions required to mobilize and 


with the focus firmly on economies of scale, these disagreements were mainly empirical matters relating to 
the scope for coordinated expansion.


Picking up on both  the  inelasticity  of  supply  and  the  importance  of  capital  goods  industries, Hirschman 
(1958) presented a  starker contrast between a balanced and unbalanced growth model. Like  the balanced 
growth theorists, he recognized that externalities could disrupt any desired investment sequence. However, for 
Hirschman growth was always, everywhere and necessarily, an intrinsically uncertain and uneven process – 
marked by rapid advances in some sectors followed by catching up in others. This made the principal challenge 
for policymakers the search for complementarities across industries rather than scale economies.


Comparing development  to  “an  endlessly  spinning  cobweb”,  he  contrasted  a  big  push with  a  sequential 
progression of promoting and then reducing “tensions, disproportions and disequilibria”, using profits and 
losses as the metric for identifying disequilibria and the means to induce subsequent investments (Hirschman, 
1958: 66). “[A]t each step, an industry takes advantage of external economies created by previous expansions, 
and at the same time creates new external economies to be exploited by other operators” (Hirschman, 1958: 67). 
The role of the state planner is to assess whether productive private investment or infrastructure investment will
induce the most progress in other industries, through creating excess capacity or shortages. Hirschman introduced 
the concept of (backward and forward) linkages as the mechanism for simultaneous and progressive expansion 
in both domestic demand and supply and to better identify the sectors to focus on. This made input–output 
tables, rather than aggregate demand, Hirschman’s policy framework of choice. Since he was unconvinced that 
most developing countries had the capabilities to undertake big centralized investment programmes, he offered 
a more pragmatic approach to infrastructure planning that would help break the “interlocking vicious circles” 
of underdevelopment (Hirschman, 1958: 5). This would occur by allowing infrastructure (“social overhead 
capital”) to lag behind in an investment sequence beginning with productive private investment primarily in 
the capital goods and intermediate goods sectors (see Hirschman, 1958: 83).


Arguably, the contrast between the two approaches was oversold at the time, as Streeten (1959) recognized 
and Hirschman  (1961,  1987)  later  accepted. Both  approaches were  concerned with  investment  planning 
and both (albeit to different degrees) recognized that expanding output ahead of demand would give rise to 
further complementary investments and innovations. This was particularly true of infrastructure investments, 
given the significant indivisibilities those involved. Indeed, the two theories began with the challenge of a 
divergence between social and private returns, employed much the same conceptual framework – indivisibilities, 
externalities, increasing returns, complementarities in supply and demand – and acknowledged a central role for 
the state. This turns the discussion of investment planning, including with respect to infrastructure, into a matter 
of empirical detail about where scale economies are located and the political economy question of whether or
not the developmental state has the requisite institutional capacities to pursue larger- or smaller-scale projects.


FIGURE 4.2 Number of electrical outages
in a typical month


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on World Bank
Enterprise Surveys: What Businesses Experience database.
Available at: http://www.enterprisesurveys.org/data/exploretopics/
infrastructure (accessed 7 March 2018).


0


5


10


15


20


25


30


North
Africa


Sub-Saharan
Africa


East Asia South Asia South-East
Asia


Latin America
and the


Caribbean




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


112


coordinate resources, have to be addressed directly 
through  industrial policies of one kind or another. 
Second, in addition to expanding the “right” invest-
ments,  it may  also be necessary  to  restrict  certain 
kinds of private investments and production that pull 
the economy into unforeseen and undesired directions. 
In the absence of such disciplining mechanisms, it is 
also likely that public investments, including in infra-
structure, will be captured by certain private interests, 
with their potential development impact reduced or
lost altogether.


3. Historical experiences


While infrastructure can boost productivity growth 
through a variety of channels, its contribution to sus-
taining a virtuous development circle does not occur 
in an institutional or policy vacuum. The gains that 
infrastructure brought during the industrial revolu-
tion, first in England and then in continental European 
countries, were not only the result of long-standing 
investments spanning decades or even centuries; they 
were often built on clear policy visions that placed
infrastructure at the centre of nation-building efforts. 
Indeed,  the  later  industrialization began,  the more 
conscious those efforts appear to have become, given 
the larger investment push that was usually required 
to achieve catch-up (TDR 2003, 2016).


As Haldane (2018) has noted, the series of success-
ful transformation episodes that have sustained an
unprecedented ratcheting up in living standards over 
the past 250 years have all tended to involve the inter-
linking of infrastructure, innovation and institutions 
in ways  that have not only  supported higher  rates 
of capital formation but also responded to the eco-
nomic and social disturbances that accompany such
episodes. For example, structural change in Britain 
between 1760 and 1860 was not simply the fortuitous 
product of  technological breakthroughs  and entre-
preneurial endeavour, but rather the intertwining of 
a series of industrial, agricultural and demographic 
changes. The private capital behind  these changes 
was often on a relatively small scale but more sig-
nificant  investments were  needed  in  physical  and 
social infrastructure to ensure the required linkages 
across the newly emerging activities and to support 
businesses, workers  and  society buffeted by  these 
changes. This was particularly true for the turnpikes, 
canals and railways that accompanied Britain’s rise 
as a global economic superpower. Britain gained an 
advantage from the early streamlining of legislative 


procedures for infrastructure projects and the fact that 
these projects could be effectively implemented and 
managed at a regional level, reflecting its pattern of 
spatially unbalanced industrial development, through 
ad hoc  initiatives  among  interested private  actors. 
National initiatives only emerged later to better coor-
dinate existing projects in line with the demands of a 
more sophisticated and integrated national economy.


In Europe,  the French  architect Michel Chevalier 
was one of the first to envision a scheme for a multi-
country infrastructure network at the heart of efforts 
to  end poverty  and  conflict  in Europe. Conceived 
in  1830, Chevalier’s  impressive  plan7 was for a
grand European  transport  system  to  connect  the 
entire continent with rails, roads and shipping routes, 
whereby  railway  lines  spanning  over  60,000  km 
would  traverse  from  the Mediterranean,  the Black 
Sea and the Caspian Sea (through northbound lines), 
linking them to eastbound destinations of Flanders 
at  the North  Sea  via Warsaw, Vilnius,  Riga  and 
St Petersburg to the Russian Pacific (Högselius et al., 
2015; Drolet, 2015). He believed that enhanced con-
nectivity  between  regions would  encourage  trade, 
commerce and  industrialization  in Europe and  the 
Ottoman Empire, and that this was the only way to 
foster  political  harmony. This  vision  tied  “public 
works” (as infrastructure was then known) intimately 
with the economic, political and industrial progress 
of Europe at the time. The essential features of this 
plan were  indeed  adopted  by France  as well  as  a 
number of European countries that became independ-
ent between 1830 and 1871, including Belgium, the 
German Empire, Greece, Italy, Serbia and Romania; 
and it even led to cross-country multilateral initia-
tives  for  infrastructure  expansion  (Ambrosius  and 
Henrich-Franke, 2016). Many of these countries saw 
railways  as  a means  for  industrial  transformation, 
with  the  result  that  the European  railway network 
expanded from 1,865 miles  to over 215,000 miles 
between 1840 and 1913 (Ambrosius and Henrich-
Franke, 2016: 44).


In  the United States,  the development of  transport 
(notably railway) stimulated several industries such 
as iron, steel and timber; encouraged financial enter-
prise  by promoting private  investments  into  these 
sectors and railway construction; and contributed
directly to the generation of national income through 
the provision and expansion of interregional and local 
transportation services (Jenks, 1944, 1951; Pereira 
et al., 2014; Shaw, 2014). Rohatyn (2009) provides 
examples of bold public moves on infrastructure in




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


113


the United States over two centuries that transformed
the country and its economic potential:


•  the construction of the Erie Canal, which opened 
a water route to the west;


•  Lincoln’s  support  for  the  transcontinental  rail-
road, which transformed the country and enabled 
vast new cities to emerge;


•  Land Grant  colleges  that  started  in  the mid-
nineteenth century, which dramatically expanded 
access to higher education;


•  the Homestead Act of 1852, which enabled the 
westward expansion of population and settlement;


•  the construction of the Panama Canal in the early 
twentieth century, which enabled ships  to pass 
between Atlantic and Pacific oceans and effec-
tively sealed the hegemony of the United States 
in the region for the next century;


•  the Rural Electrification Administration of  the 
Franklin D. Roosevelt government, which brought 
electricity to the rural United States with all its
attendant benefits;


•  the GI Bill (Serviceman’s Readjustment Act of 
1944), which  provided  free  college  education 
and low-interest home and business loans to
all veterans with more than 90 days in uniform, 
thereby creating a secure domestic market;


•  the interstate highway system created by Eisen-
hower’s Federal Aid Highway Act, which revi-
talized the economy and modernized the United 
States.


As Rohatyn notes, the benefits extended far beyond 
the  purely  economic:  “Canals,  roads,  highways, 
schools, electrical power grids – it was this extensive 
and innovative infrastructure that made life in the
United States more  comfortable, more  egalitarian 
and more secure” (2009: 221).


An important feature of the evolution of infrastruc-
ture development in these countries was the gradual 
but increasing significance of public control. While 
early systems in nineteenth- and twentieth-century
Europe and the United States were often entirely
private or a mix of public and private (with some
significant public investment exceptions), from the 
late nineteenth century onwards there was a gradual 
public  takeover  of  responsibility,  supported  by 
broader  national  visions  of  “municipal  socialism” 
in Europe and “progressivism” in the United States 
(Marshall, 2013).


The experience with railway expansion in the United
States during the second half of the nineteenth century 
is particularly instructive. In the first phase, extensive 
state involvement was essentially through subsidies, 
regulations, legal privileges, military protection, etc. 
as part of an early public–private partnership model. 
This enabled the rapid development of a transcon-
tinental  network,  but  also  gave  rise  to  financial 
speculation, market concentration and inefficiencies, 
business failures and political corruption. The public 
control that followed, particularly during the time of 
the New Deal, made it possible for governments to 
integrate spatial planning at the national, regional and 
local levels; and enabled an integrated approach to 
development, whereby infrastructure investments and 
maintenance were closely coordinated with national
economic goals and requirements.


As  it  became  evident with  time  that  infrastruc-
ture  provision  calls  for  coordination,  institutional 
frameworks to govern infrastructure emerged at the 
national level, which sought to centralize control with 
national authorities so as to plan and develop infra-
structure integrating spatial, economic and temporal 
perspectives. Governments  began  to  use  bilateral 
and plurilateral  agreements  to  achieve  some  level 
of  standardization. As  the coexistence of  state-run 
and private rail lines in much of continental Europe, 
the United States and Britain led to clashes between 
private and public infrastructure systems (Cootner, 
1963; Shaw, 2014), combinations of competitive and 
cooperative development structures were developed
across road transport, telecommunications and postal 
services  (Ambrosius  and Henrich-Franke,  2016; 
Nerlove, 1966).


While  the  links  between  development  and  infra-
structure spending appear  to have grown closer  in 
the  late  industrializing  economy of  the nineteenth 
century,  triggering a virtuous circle augmented by 
increased  international  trade,  those  links were  a 
good deal more tenuous for many developing coun-
tries. Indeed, the new communication technologies 
of  that  era,  railways,  steamships  and  telegraphs, 
created  a  global  infrastructure network  that  led  to 
growing income gaps as many developing countries 
were locked into a vicious circle of increased trade, 
weak  diversification  and  low productivity  growth 
(TDR 1997; Pascali, 2017). In many of the colonized 
countries,  this same infrastructure shaped a highly 
uneven internal economic landscape: many devel-
oping countries inherited city planning or transport 
and port networks that were built for other purposes, 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


114


like natural resource exports, rather than developing
a vibrant domestic market, and are still having to
address the resultant inadequacies and imbalances
(Rodney, 1973; Cooper, 1993). The globalization
experience in the nineteenth century serves as an
important reminder that simply expecting a combina-
tion of new technology, infrastructure spending and
trade to deliver sustainable and inclusive growth is
not borne out by the historical record.


Only after the Second World War were some devel-
oping countries able to establish their own virtuous
circle linking infrastructure, industrialization, trade
and economic growth. In the Republic of Korea – a
prime example of manufacturing-led industrializa-
tion after the Second World War – the confluence
of technological advance, export promotion, invest-
ment and capital accumulation was linked not only
to favourable external conditions but also to multi-
annual plans from 1962 to 1992 that set out targets
and allocated resources for investments in social
overhead capital. Infrastructure investment was a key
element of these plans (see table 4.1), to the extent
that between 1960 and 2002, it amounted to 14 per
cent of GDP on average (Bang, 2003).8


Similarly, in China over the past three decades, the
emphasis on infrastructure had the purpose of cre-
ating and enabling high-linkage sectors that were
critical for generating growth (Holz, 2011). After the
Asian crisis of 1997–1998, the Chinese Government


increased public infrastructure investment rapidly to
stimulate domestic demand and promote economic
growth, and these were the underlying reasons for the
increase in public infrastructure investment after the
2008 crisis as well. Public infrastructure investment
grew in real terms at an average annual rate of 25 per
cent over 1997–2010 (Zhang et al., 2013: 91).9 This
was instrumental in creating two distinct types of
external economies. First, consistent infrastructure
investment resulted in reduction in costs for private
sector activity and enlargement of the market, as dis-
persed and fragmented pockets of small demand were
converted into larger markets of effective demand.
The expansion of public infrastructure and profitabil-
ity of private activities raised wages and promoted
consumption, while backward linkages led to private
investment in new sectors. Second, public investment
in strategic sectors created vertical economies in the
intermediate stages of production, leading to possi-
bilities of forward linkages between such activities
and other lagging sectors to promote growth through
“returning” economies (Sutcliffe, 1964).


In both the Republic of Korea and China, infrastruc-
ture investments were sequenced according to the
needs of the industrial sectors. This is similar to the
successful cases of industrializers in the nineteenth
century, such as Europe and the United States,
where targeting infrastructure investments accord-
ing to sectoral needs was planned and coordinated
so as to avoid bottlenecks that slow down national


TABLE 4.1 The role of infrastructure in industrialization of the Republic of Korea


Industrial policy phase Key infrastructure investments


1960–1970: First five-year development plan, along with
policy to promote exporters across sectors such as iron, silk
and fishing.


Development of the Seoul–Busan Highway and the Busan
Port for exports; construction of power plants to support
iron and steel and other core sectors; investment in primary
education.


1970–1980: Accelerated industrialization with focus on
promoting large exporting sectors, including textiles,
plywood, iron ore and electronics.


National land development plan; investments in the Seoul
Metro, Honam Highway, Yeongdong Highway and industrial
complexes, nuclear power plants to support energy needs for
industry.


1980–1990: Rationalization and restructuring, with focus on
upgrading products and processes, especially in textiles,
electronics, iron and steel products, footwear and ships.


A slowdown in aggregate infrastructure investment; targeted
investments to build the regional energy supply system;
strengthening of secondary and tertiary education and
expansion of national R&D programme to support expansion
of high technology sectors.


1990–2000: Transition to a knowledge-based economy,
with focus on semiconductors, automobiles, computers and
ships.


Expansion of transportation facilities, such as the Incheon
Airport and high-speed railway system; information highway
and e-government projects; further increase in public
investment in higher education.


Source: Bang, 2003.




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


115


and regional growth. This also meant  that, despite 
increasing  participation  of  the  private  sector,  the 
reins of infrastructure planning and coordination were 
firmly with the government, to ensure the appropriate 
balance between national  economic,  social,  urban 


and environmental goals.10 This strategy implicitly 
recognized the strong intertemporal dimension, since 
building infrastructure that promotes structural trans-
formation requires long-term coordination, spanning 
several decades (Shi et al., 2017).


C. Infrastructure in developing countries


1. Needs and gaps


In the past several years, multilateral financial insti-
tutions, private consultancy firms and international 
experts have provided estimates of infrastructure
investment needs, for both developed and developing 
countries, based on current and medium-term require-
ments. Table 4.2 summarizes some recent estimates 
for (mainly) economic infrastructure investment at 
the global level and by sector, which suggest annual 
needs  ranging  from $4.6  trillion  to  $7.9  trillion.11
This range includes estimates using both baseline and 
low-carbon scenarios. The baseline scenario assumes 
that  current  growth will  continue  into  the  future, 
while  the  investment needs  for addressing climate 
change hinge heavily on the concept of sustainable 
infrastructure.12


The large variation (over $3 trillion) across estimates, 
is  because  of  differences  in methodologies,  data 
sources and the types of expenditures considered.13
All  of  these  calculations  involve  a wide  array  of 
assumptions  about  future  infrastructure  demand, 


prices and technological change. For obvious reasons, 
all such estimates of future needs for infrastructure
investment  have  problems  related  to  coverage, 
assumptions  and methodologies. There  is  lack  of 
clarity about the definition of infrastructure and types 
of investment considered, as well as lack of compre-
hensive  data  on  current  infrastructure  investment. 
The assessment of needs based on quality indicators
and the use of expected GDP growth and elasticity of 
infrastructure investment to growth are problematic.


Few  estimates  use  any  calculation  of minimum 
required infrastructure stocks, which are considered 
more pertinent for low-income countries in need of
rapid catching up. The emphasis on a “top-down” 
approach based on  the  use  of  global models  is  to 
the detriment of a “bottom-up” assessment of needs 
based  on  country-specific  circumstances  and  spe-
cific long-term development strategies. The lack of 
a network perspective  fails  to  take  full account of 
the interdependencies between sectors and types of
infrastructure. In addition, rapidly changing technolo-
gies make the task of producing accurate estimates 


TABLE 4.2  Infrastructure investment needs at the global level, annual 2015/16–2030
(Trillions of 2015 dollars)


Annual total
needs for “core”
infrastructurea


Annual
total needs
(baseline
scenario)


Annual
total needs
(low-carbon
scenario)b


Selected sectors (baseline scenario)


Power and
electricity


T&D Transport Telecoms


OECD (2017a) 4.9 6.3 6.9 0.7 2.7 0.6


Bhattacharya et al. (2016) 5.4 7.9 . 1.5 2.0 1.0


Woetzel et al. (2016) 3.3 4.6–6.0 . 1.0 1.2 0.6


NCE (2014) 3.8 6.4 7.0 0.7 1.0 0.5


Source: OECD, 2017a: tables 3, A and 4.
a “Core” infrastructure investment includes power and electricity transmission and distribution (T&D), transport (roads, rail, airports and ports),


water and sanitation, and telecommunications. Total infrastructure includes, in addition to “core” infrastructure, primary energy supply (coal, oil
and gas) and energy efficiency.


b Under the low-carbon scenario, investment in low-emission, climate-resilient infrastructure is taken into account in order to limit the rise in global
temperature to 2°C by the end of the century.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


116


particularly hard, since they would inevitably change 
future costs and needs (Woetzel et al., 2016: 13).14
Insufficient inclusion of infrastructure needs for cli-
mate change adaptation and mitigation results in more 
modest estimates (Estache, 2010; Bhattacharya et al., 
2016; Schmidt-Traub, 2015; OECD, 2017a, 2017b).


These shortcomings raise doubts about both accuracy 
and comparability across different estimates. Despite 
all  this,  international  institutions and experts have 
reached the conclusion that investment needs are
very large, especially when compared with current 


investment levels (OECD, 2017b). For developing 
countries, UNCTAD estimates investment needs of 
$1.6 trillion–$2.5 trillion per year between 2015 and 
2030, against current actual investment of $870 bil-
lion.15 An earlier study by Bhattacharya et al. (2012)
projected needs in developing countries to be between 
6 per cent and 8 per cent of GDP by 2020, against 
an actual investment level of 3 per cent in 2012.16 In
Latin America and  the Caribbean  (LAC), ECLAC 
(2017) estimated infrastructure investment needs at 
6.2 per cent against an actual spending of 3.2 per cent 
of the region’s GDP in 2015.17 In Africa, projected 
needs are said to be in the order of 5.9 per cent of 
the region’s GDP over the 2016–2040 period, against 
current trends at around 4.3 per cent (AfDB, 2018
figure 3.7; and Heathcote, 2017: 28).18 In Asia, both 
current and projected investment needs over the years 
2016–2030 have been estimated at around 5 per cent 
of GDP (ADB, 2017). These regional evaluations are 
not perfectly comparable, since they are produced by 
different organizations drawing on their own meth-
odologies and data sources.


There are large regional and intraregional variations 
in current infrastructure investment, as indicated in 
figure 4.3. In Africa, Ethiopia and United Republic 
of Tanzania spend well above 5 per cent of GDP on 
infrastructure, while Nigeria and South Africa (the 
region’s two largest economies) have expenditures of 
just above 3 per cent and Egypt just over 2 per cent. 
In Latin America, the regional average is, to a large 
extent, influenced by low infrastructure expenditure 
in  the  region’s  larger  economies, with Argentina, 
Brazil  and Mexico  spending  less  than  2  per  cent 
of GDP  in  2015. A  few  small  economies  such  as 
Guyana, Trinidad  and Tobago,  and Uruguay  also 
spend less than 2 per cent of GDP on infrastructure. In 
contrast, Andean countries such as the Plurinational 
State  of Bolivia, Colombia  and Peru  spend  above 
6 per cent, followed closely by smaller economies 
such as Nicaragua, with expenditure of nearly 6 per 
cent in 2015. In Asia, at one extreme, East Asia spent 
5.8 per cent of its GDP on infrastructure in 2011, but 
this subregional average was dominated by China, 
which showed infrastructure expenditure of 6.8 per 
cent of GDP over 2010–2014. At the other extreme, 
South-East Asia spent just 2.1 per cent, as the econo-
mies hit by the East Asian financial crisis of 1997 
(such  as  Indonesia, Malaysia,  the Philippines  and 
Thailand) experienced significant declines in public 
spending as a proportion of GDP that have not fully 
recovered thereafter (ADB, 2017: 28–30). Therefore, 
while on the whole Asia invests more and Africa and 


FIGURE 4.3 Current infrastructure investment,
selected subregions and economies
(Percentage of GDP)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on ECLAC (2017), AfDB
(2018: 80), ADB (2017) and Heathcote (2017).


Note: Asia: Current infrastructure includes the following Asian subre-
gions and economies: Central Asia (Armenia and Georgia), East
Asia (China, Mongolia, the Republic of Korea and Hong Kong,
China), South Asia (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal,
Pakistan and Sri Lanka), South-East Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia,
the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam) and The
Pacific (Fiji, Kiribati and Papua New Guinea), all for the year
2011. Africa: Current infrastructure investment expenditure in
the year 2015. Countries included are: Angola, Egypt, Kenya,
Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa and United Republic of
Tanzania. Latin America and the Caribbean: Figures are based
on InfraLatam database. Current infrastructure investment is
from year 2015. Countries included in the figure are: Argentina,
Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Chile (2014 expenditure),
Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador,
Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama,
Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay (2013 expenditure).


0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


Angola
Egypt
Kenya


Morocco
Nigeria


Senegal
South Africa


United Republic of Tanzania
Central Asia


East Asia
South Asia


South-East Asia
The Pacific


Argentina
Bolivia (Plurinational State of)


Brazil
Chile


Colombia
Costa Rica


Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Guatemala


Guyana
Honduras


Mexico
Nicaragua


Panama
Paraguay


Peru
Uruguay


A
fri


ca
A


si
a


La
tin


A
m


er
ic


a
an


d
th


e
C


ar
ib


be
an




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


117


Latin America invest less in infrastructure develop-
ment, no clear patterns emerge within regions, even 
in terms of country size or per capita income.


In sectoral terms, Heathcote (2017) indicates that in 
Latin America there will be a strong concentration of 
transportation needs in the coming decades (between 
the years 2016 and 2040), as these have been rela-
tively neglected, while  the energy sector  seems  to 
be scoring better (Fay et al., 2017: 9–10). In Africa, 
the biggest infrastructure deficit is thought to be in 
the energy sector (AfDB, 2013: 3, 2018), although 
even  here,  transport  stands  out  as  the  sector with 
the largest financing needs over the coming decades 
(see figure 4.3). In Asia, the largest financing needs 
are estimated to be in the energy sector, followed by 
transport.


Another way of  estimating  infrastructure  needs  is 
to look at absolute gaps in existing stock of  infra-
structure  according  to  various  indicators.  Road 
density per square kilometre is a very rough indica-
tor  of  the  development  of  transport  infrastructure, 
and it must obviously be seen also in the context
of  terrain, population density and other ecological 
considerations. Nevertheless,  figure  4.4  points  to 
truly shocking differences between Europe and the 
developing regions, while within Asia (which shows 
slightly  better  levels)  there  are  large  differences 
between East Asia and most of the rest of the con-
tinent. This confirms the overall logistical problems 
that are very much a reflection of the overall state 
of infrastructure as expressed in figure 4.5, whereby 
most developing regions are still on average able to 


meet just above half of the performance standards in 
the United States.


Figure 4.6 indicates the still-huge gaps in access to 
energy, in terms of the proportion of the population 
with  access  to  electricity  and  clean  cooking  fuel. 
Clearly, massive investments will be required in sub-
Saharan Africa and Asia to approach anything like the 
coverage already achieved in advanced economies; 
and the challenge is made even greater by the large 
absolute populations in both regions.


FIGURE 4.4 Paved road density
(Km of paved road per 100 km2 of land area)


Source: AfDB, 2018: table 3.3.


FIGURE 4.5 Logistics performance index, 2016


Source: World Development Indicators database, Logistics Performance
Index surveys, conducted by the World Bank in partnership with
public and private institutions engaged in international logistics.


Note: Respondents evaluated the quality of infrastructure related to
trade and transport (e.g. ports, railroads, roads, information
technology), assigning values from 1 (very low) to 5 (very high).


FIGURE 4.6 Energy access, 2016
(Percentage of total population)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on World Development
Indicators database.


0


20


40


60


80


100


120


140


Africa Asia Europe Latin America


0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5


North Africa


Sub-Saharan Africa


East Asia


South Asia


South-East Asia


Latin America and
the Caribbean


United States


0 20 40 60 80 100


North Africa


Sub-Saharan Africa


East Asia


South Asia


South-East Asia


Latin America and
the Caribbean


To electricity
To clean fuels for cooking




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


118


Telephone connectivity (whether through landline or 
mobile telephony) was seen in the previous chapter 
to be essential for taking advantage of new digital 
technologies. However,  figure  4.7  indicates  that, 
despite  the  significant  recent  expansion  in  such 
connections, there are still gaps in most developing 
regions. Meanwhile,  access  to  infrastructure  that 
is seen as essential for social and human develop-
ment indicates even larger gaps in most developing 
regions. Figure 4.8 shows how the majority of the 
population of sub-Saharan Africa and large swathes 


of South  and South-East Asia  in particular do not 
have access to piped water, especially within homes. 
Gaps are also huge with respect to basic sanitation 
facilities, as evident from figure 4.9.


2. The financing gap narrative


Both  the  historical  discussion  and  the  challenges 
outlined in section B point to the need for countries 
to  have  a  comprehensive  long-term  vision  that 
recognizes  the  need  to  coordinate  across  sectors, 
regions  and  timelines,  along with  a more  targeted 
medium-term planned approach towards infrastruc-
ture creation. This contrasts, quite sharply, with the 
current approach to infrastructure investment that
looks at individual projects on a case-by-case basis to 
ensure that they are “bankable” (assuring repayment 
of loans taken for such investment) and requires that 
all investors in such projects get adequate returns.


The  current  approach  can  be  traced  back  to  two 
important changes that upended the policy discussion 
from the late 1970s. First, the sharp ascendency of 
a market-friendly perspective on infrastructure that 
gained wide  currency by  the  1980s  prompted  the 
emergence of a narrower view related to measuring, 
understanding and improving conditions for provid-
ing infrastructure at the micro level (see e.g. Andrés et 
al., 2013). This approach, along with intense scrutiny 
of the entire public investment-driven infrastructure
model,  led  to a widespread privatization of public 


FIGURE 4.7 Telephone access and use, 2016
(Subscriptions per 100 people)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on World Development
Indicators database.


0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160


North Africa


Sub-Saharan Africa


East Asia


South Asia


South-East Asia


Latin America and
the Caribbean


Fixed telephone
Mobile phone


FIGURE 4.8 Safely managed water supply
access, 2015
(Percentage of total population)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on WHO/UNICEF
database (July 2017 update).


0 20 40 60 80 100


North Africa


Sub-Saharan Africa


East Asia


South Asia


South-East Asia


Latin America and
the Caribbean


Accessible on premises
Piped


FIGURE 4.9 Sanitation facilities access, 2015
(Percentage of total population)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on WHO/UNICEF
database (July 2017 update).


0 20 40 60 80 100


North Africa


Sub-Saharan Africa


East Asia


South Asia


South-East Asia


Latin America and
the Caribbean


At least basic Limited (shared)
Unimproved Open defecation




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


119


infrastructure services in the 1980s, assisted by meas-
ures to downsize state spending, reduce regulatory 
oversight and liberalize financial markets. In the case 
of the United Kingdom, the resulting reorganization 
was not just a transfer of state-owned business into 
private hands; it entailed commercialization of infra-
structure sectors in an “attempt to re-engineer public 
institutions on a model of market exchange” (Meek, 
2014: 57). This view was promoted  in developing 
countries,  in  particular,  through  the World Bank’s 
Doing Business Report.19  Second,  the  process  of 
hyperglobalization that picked up steam during the 
1990s (see TDR 2017) further cemented these pro-
cesses by promoting a global shift towards privatized 
infrastructure  services  and  the  financialization  of 
infrastructure provision. Priemus and van Wee (2013) 
note  that  infrastructure  no  longer  is  just  a  public 
good, but has now become a widely popular, globally 
traded, asset class. The long-term, steady nature of 
infrastructure investments has been instrumental in
endearing it to markets, making them the chosen class 
for institutional financial investors such as insurance 
companies, pension funds sovereign wealth funds and 
other foundations (Weber et al., 2016).


The financing gap narrative with respect to infrastruc-
ture is built around a few key points. First, estimated 
infrastructure investment gaps in each country (dis-
cussed above) are taken to imply a financing gap of 
a similar order of magnitude. Second, it is taken for 
granted that national public sectors in most countries 
are financially  constrained with  limited budgetary 
resources,  face  governance  problems  and  run  the 
risk of running into debt sustainability issues if they 
undertake  infrastructure  investments  on  the  scale 
needed in the coming years. Third, given this public 
resource  constraint,  private  capital, which  is  typi-
cally invested in short-term financial assets, should 
be unlocked for infrastructure projects. Fourth, for 
this to occur, a pipeline of “bankable” projects needs 
to be developed.


“Bankable” projects are defined as those “that pro-
vide investors with appropriate risk-adjusted returns” 
(Woetzel et al., 2016: 17). The standard diagnosis is 
that projects that fit that profile are currently scarce 
and  the  risk-adjusted  returns  of  existing  projects 
are  too  low  to attract private  investors. Numerous 
factors are pinpointed as restricting the delivery of 
“bankable” projects. These include low preparation 
capacity, high transaction costs, lack of liquid finan-
cial  instruments, weak  regulatory  frameworks and 
legal opposition, along with various  types of risks 


at the different phases of the life cycle of a project, 
such  as: macroeconomic,  political,  technical  and 
environmental  risks  at  the  phase  of  preparation; 
construction risks (overrun, cost escalation) during 
construction phase; and demand, operating and rev-
enue risks (e.g. price and exchange risks; unrealized 
projected demand) at the operation phase (Serebrisky 
et al., 2015; Bhattacharya et al., 2012; Woetzel et al., 
2016; G20, 2011).


In  order  to  expand  the  supply of  “bankable”  pro-
jects, the proponents argue that new paths should be 
explored to enhance prospective returns and mini-
mize risks that often arise during the life cycle of a 
project. To enhance returns, projects should be able 
to generate sufficient revenues over their life cycle, 
through adoption of user charges, public sector sup-
port (typically in the form of “viability gap finance”) 
and additional funding. Proposed measures to reduce 
risks and uncertainties  include: clear  identification 
of  actual  returns  and  possible  risks  (including  of 
default);  development  of  governance  structures  to 
ensure approval of stakeholders, including through 
compensation  schemes;  provision  of  de-risking 
instruments such as sovereign and credit guarantees; 
and government mapping of  long-term investment 
paths to reduce investors’ uncertainty about the future 
(Woetzel et al., 2016; G20, 2011).


Other proposed measures to increase project “bank-
ability” and thus attract private finance include the 
development  of more  liquid  security  exchanges, 
with  governments  acting  as market makers  (for 
instance, through issuing of equity and debt on their 
own infrastructure projects); and adoption of more 
favourable  international  investment  frameworks, 
with limits on expropriation, effective compensation 
and binding dispute-resolution mechanisms. In addi-
tion, standardization of contractual terms is identified 
as important to attract funds to smaller projects, as is 
project pooling to reduce transaction costs and attract 
larger  investors. Finally, supply-side constraints  to 
additional  private financing  include  strict  pension 
investment  rules  and  regulatory  restrictions  such 
as Basel  III  and Solvency  II, which  require more 
capital allocation for infrastructure (Woetzel et al., 
2016: 23–26).


The list is long, but an important conclusion is that 
project  “bankability”  extends beyond  the  intrinsic 
characteristics  of  the  project  itself.  It  depends  in 
large measure on the wider institutional and regula-
tory conditions  in which private finance might  (or 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


120


not)  be made  available,  such  as  better  developed 
capital markets and an investor-friendly regulatory 
framework. In this scheme, planning is identified as 
necessary  to  create  such  “bankable”  projects  and, 
as the G20 puts it, “[m]ore resources are needed for 
project  preparation…  [as  it]  encompasses  a wide 
range of activities that have to take place before a pro-
ject can be of interest to potential financiers” (G20, 
2011:  11).  In  line with  this  diagnosis, multilateral 
development banks are stepping in, by establishing 
joint  investment  platforms  in which  they  provide 
technical expertise, capacity-building and financing 
instruments  to  increase  the  supply  of  “bankable” 
projects (G20, 2011; UNCTAD, 2018).


The  financing  gap  narrative  raises  an  important 
concern that is shared by the wider development
community: the recognition that infrastructure devel-
opment is indispensable for sustainable and inclusive
growth.  In many parts of  the world,  infrastructure 
investment  has  declined  since  the  global  crisis 
(Woetzel et al., 2016: 10). Public investment, which 
can be used as a proxy for infrastructure investment, 
in developed countries was at a historic low at 3.4 per 
cent of GDP in 2015, against 4.7 in 1980 and about 
6 per cent in the 1960s. In emerging economies, it 
fell from above 8 per cent of GDP in the early 1980s 
to 4.3 per cent in 2000, recovering to 5.7 per cent in 
2008 and declining again thereafter (figure 4.10). It 
is worth noting  that  the outlier  in  this respect was 
China, with  impressive  rates  of  public  investment 


to GDP of 15 per cent to 20 per cent and associated 
high rates of output growth for several decades. The 
decline in public investment in developing countries 
in the 1980s and 1990s can be linked to adoption of 
fiscal adjustment policies in response to the debt cri-
ses and as part of structural adjustment programmes. 
The world as a whole is, therefore, underinvesting, 
and consequently creating a cumulative infrastructure 
gap, even though uncertainty remains as to its exact 
order of magnitude.


Nevertheless, the financing gap narrative has serious 
limitations. The first concern is with respect to the 
expected scale and role of private sector engagement 
in  infrastructure development. As noted  in  section 
B,  through  history,  domestic  public  financing  for 
infrastructure development has been dominant; and
experience  suggests  that  such public  sector  domi-
nance will continue even if private finance grows in 
the years ahead. Even today, where private finance 
exists, it comes in together with public funding. In 
Africa, domestic public finance accounts for 66 per 
cent of  total  infrastructure finance (G20, 2011: 7). 
In Latin America,  instances  in which  private  par-
ticipation in infrastructure (PPI) occur have public 
finance accounting for a third of total project funding 
(Fay et al., 2017: 8).20 In low-income countries, this 
proportion  is  nearly  75  per  cent  (G20,  2011:  10). 
In Asia,  private  investment  dominates  in  the  tel-
ecommunications  sector and also has a  significant 
presence  in  the energy  sector, but  its participation 
is very small in transport and virtually non-existent
in water  and  sanitation  (ADB, 2017). Thus, while 
private sector involvement in infrastructure invest-
ment may increase with greater supply of “bankable” 
projects, any rapid recovery of overall infrastructure 
investment in the future will critically depend on gov-
ernments’ capacities to carry out their leadership roles 
in planning and executing new infrastructure projects.


The reasons for public sector dominance in infrastruc-
ture have to do with the intrinsic characteristics of
infrastructure projects. These include their long ges-
tation periods, capital intensity, difference between 
private and social returns, complexity of planning and 
execution, the feedback loops with growth and eco-
nomic development, the specificities of the countries 
executing infrastructure projects and the non-linear 
impacts of infrastructure investments (see section D). 
In addition, there are macro, institutional and envi-
ronmental risks and uncertainties, factors that have 
a strong bearing on the viability and profitability of 
such projects. “Bankable” projects can mitigate some 


FIGURE 4.10 Trends in public investment, 1980–2015
(Percentage of GDP)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on IMF capital stock
data set.


Note: Public investment here is General Government Investment (gross
fixed capital formation).


0


5


10


15


20


25


1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015


Developed economies


Developing economies
(excl. China)


China




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


121


of these problems when well planned and executed, 
but they do not eliminate them entirely. More broadly, 
infrastructure sectors are closely interdependent, and 
therefore it is critical that infrastructure development
is  approached  systemically  by  the  state, which  is 
the only actor with the required political power and
coordination  capacity. Leaving  the  leadership  role 
vacant and expecting the private sector to fill the gaps 
is likely to lead to an outcome in which a fragmented 
infrastructure  landscape emerges, characterized by 
underinvestment, sectoral concentration of resources 
and persistently large infrastructure gaps.


This means  that  the  overall  development  strategy 
should determine infrastructure planning (e.g. what 
scale to target, and which sectors and technologies 
to prioritize), and to indicate the resources required 
to achieve these goals. This implies a reversal of the 
sequencing suggested by the financing gap approach. 
Instead  of  starting with  the  identification  of  gaps 
between actual and needed investment for infrastruc-
ture, followed by rigid assumptions of government 
expenditure  capacity,  estimating  private financing 
required and ending with project design  strategies 
to attract private capital  to fill  in the gap, the start 
should  be with  a  national  development  strategy. 
This would then be followed by a consideration of
the infrastructure development needed to support
this strategy, how government planning can support 
this process, how fiscal space may be expanded and 
what public–private investment mix could achieve 
these goals.


A second limiting aspect of the financing gap nar-
rative is that a project is understood as “bankable” 
in ways that are not necessarily desirable, since the 
features that might make a project “bankable” may 
not conform to the sort of development a national
government may want  to  pursue.  For  instance,  to 
what extent will a “favourable” international invest-
ment framework, understood as a condition to make 
a  project  “bankable”,  rob  a  national  government 
of precious space to pursue its policy goals? Or, to 


what extent may “bankable” projects entail trade-offs 
between productive and social infrastructures? Also, 
“bankable” projects imply de-risking by the public 
sector  through provision of  subsidies, which may 
erode  governments’  financial  capacity  to  execute 
other  elements  of  the  national  development  plan. 
All  this  suggests  that, within  a  clearly  established 
national development strategy, the terms of project 
“bankability” should be set not by private actors but 
‒ if at all ‒ by national governments to ensure con-
sistency between means and ends. That is, the state 
should decide both what general (macro, institutional, 
regulatory) and specific conditions  it may want  to 
provide and what projects should be prioritized and 
(in case it decides in favour of private sector involve-
ment) on what terms this should happen to ensure that 
private engagement is in line with national objectives.


A  third problematic  aspect  of  the financing narra-
tive is the notion that the public sector is always
and everywhere financially constrained because of 
restricted fiscal space and persistent or potential debt 
burdens, and therefore incentivizing the private sec-
tor to invest in infrastructure is the only option. To 
begin with,  these  incentives  to private  actors may 
turn out  to  have  larger  and more prolonged fiscal 
costs than anticipated, which would adversely affect 
public finances in any case. But more importantly, 
in reality, fiscal space and borrowing limits are not 
fixed, as revenues can be increased through various 
means and credit from the Central Bank can also play 
a role. This is important because public investment 
has the power to crowd in private investment, rais-
ing productivity, incomes and taxes. The successful 
historical experiences described in section B followed 
just such a trajectory.


Matters  of  legitimacy,  credibility  and  trust  are, 
undoubtedly,  complex  institutional  issues when  it 
comes to raising public revenue, but it can be argued 
that effective planning is just as big an issue facing 
many countries when it comes to the infrastructure
challenge. This is considered in the next section.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


122


A strategy of unbalanced growth, as noted earlier, 
assumes  that  there  are  some  sectors  that  generate 
more forward and backward linkages than others and 
that government policy should target  those sectors 
in terms of its efforts to mobilize, channel and man-
age resources and capabilities in ways that support 
a more virtuous growth circle. As discussed in TDR
2016, this implies the use of active industrial poli-
cies, mixing both general and selective measures, to 
support efforts to diversify and upgrade the economy. 
The Report  acknowledged  that  this would  require 
substantial state capacity, including the capacity to 
discipline recipients of support as well as to stimulate
a  learning economy at all  levels.  In both  respects, 
it  also  argued  that  to  get  the most  out  of  active 
policies,  the  developmental  state  should  establish 
a meaningful dialogue with the business sector and 
other stakeholders but in doing so should also avoid 
capture of the policy and regulatory framework by 
specific interest groups.


This  chapter  has  argued  that  infrastructure  pro-
grammes should also be seen as a complementary 
part  of  such  a  development  strategy. However, 
infrastructure programmes do require government to 
take more of a planning perspective than is the case 
with industrial policy. The difference is a subtle but 
important one, particularly as  the polarized debate 
between  balanced  versus  unbalanced  growth  has 
tended  to  pitch  industrial  policy  and  planning  as 
being opposed.


1. Some basic considerations


It is evident from the discussion so far that the specific 
features of infrastructure require moving beyond a 
purely project-led approach based on the financing 
gap narrative. Far from simply focusing on “small” 
mechanisms that identify and remove roadblocks for 
economic activities,  “large” mechanisms  that give 
strategic importance to certain industries play a criti-
cal role in promoting linkages through unbalanced 
growth  thus  inducing  industrialization  (Hausmann 
et al., 2008; Holz 2011: 221).  In  fact, both  theory 
and experience suggest that infrastructure’s role as 
an  inducement mechanism  to  industrialization  is 
dependent on how infrastructure investments are
structured and whether key feedback loops between 


infrastructure,  growth  and  economic  development 
are  factored  into  the  infrastructure  planning  pro-
cess. Some critical  considerations  that have direct 
relevance for organizing infrastructure investments 
in developing countries are as follows.


a. The impact of infrastructure depends on the
kind of investment


Some types of infrastructure (such as roads and
telecommunications) have  a greater  impact on 
productivity  than  others  (e.g.  air  transport  or 
sewage). Thus, for the development of linkages, 
it matters which infrastructure investments are
prioritized. This in turn will depend upon how 
the stock of  infrastructure has evolved histori-
cally relative to income, the pattern and pace of 
urbanization,  the  economic  and  institutional 
structures of countries (Fay et al., 2017) as well 
as how the investments are likely to induce link-
ages with local private sector activity.


b. The impact of infrastructure is context- and
sector-specific


    The impact of infrastructure on growth is influ-
enced by initial conditions, which explains why 
infrastructure development has immediate and
relatively  large  impacts  on  poorer  countries, 
as opposed to advanced countries where there
is  already  a  relatively  good  network  of  infra-
structure in place (Calderón and Servén, 2014). 
However,  even  at  low  levels  of  infrastructural 
development,  there  is  no  guarantee  that  new 
infrastructure  of  the  same  kind will  result  in 
similar  outcomes  across  countries  or  sectors. 
For example,  although  there  is  a  link between 
power outages and productivity of firms, these 
impacts will vary between countries and sectors, 
depending on how acute the problem of power 
provision in the country is, and how dependent 
a sector is on continuous power provision for
its production (Moyo, 2013). Similarly, even in 
a context of overall paucity of roads, efforts to 
increase connectivity through road infrastructure 
are likely to have the most impact when targeted 
to those regions where industrial activity is more 
easily facilitated.


c. The impact of infrastructure is non-linear


    Greater  infrastructure  investment  does  not 
always lead immediately to faster growth. Since 


D. A framework for considering the role of
infrastructure in development




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


123


infrastructure investment typically has significant 
economies of scale, it begins to have an impact 
on private sector productivity only after a thresh-
old level of infrastructure investment has been
reached. The relationship between infrastructure 
and growth can  therefore  take  the shape of an 
inverted “U” curve, where at initial stages, low or 
no infrastructure has no impact on growth, until 
after a threshold where additional infrastructure
will contribute to sharp rises in marginal growth, 
until economies reach a level of infrastructure
provision  that  is  almost  complete.  From  that 
point  on,  additional  infrastructure  investments 
have once again low or no impact on economic 
growth. As an example, constructing roads will 
have limited effects on growth until and unless 
some  road networks  are  developed. At  such  a 
point, additional roads will prompt a sharp rise in 
output, until a large network has been established, 
after which point, any more roads or maintenance 
expenditure can be expected to have low or no
output effects (Calderón and Servén, 2014).21


d. The impact of infrastructure depends on net-
work effects within and between different kinds
of investments


    All forms of modern infrastructure – transport, 
electricity, telecommunications and broadband – 
exhibit their own network effects. For instance, 
in the case of the Internet, the greater the number 
of  Internet  users,  the greater  the possibility of 
providing various online services. But different 
infrastructure investments also exhibit network 
effects between themselves, because achieving 
economies of scale in infrastructure provision is
often not just a case of providing for one kind of 
infrastructure but also entails complementarities
between  several  other  kinds  of  infrastructure 
investments (Agénor, 2010; Jiwattanakulpaisarn 
et  al.,  2012). For  example,  energy  to  promote 
production in rural areas would not necessarily
lead to an increase in the rate of return to enter-
prises in the absence of other investments, such 
as roads or telecommunications. Thus, the recent 
large-scale electricity roll-out in Rwanda did not 
seem to have a large impact on micro-enterprises 
because  of  additional  obstacles,  such  as  inad-
equate transport links, that limit their expansion 
(Lenz et al., 2017).


In  addition  to  these  considerations,  other  policy 
choices and macro processes also play a role in
determining how infrastructure interacts with growth 


and productivity. This includes the pace and nature 
of  capital  accumulation,  technological  advance-
ment, institutions that determine the sequencing of 
infrastructure investment and its interaction with
production capacities, linkages that emerge between 
sectors  over  time,  and  eventually,  trade  relations 
and international competitiveness (see Gomory and 
Baumol, 2000). This reiterates the need for planning, 
which is elaborated upon in the following subsection.


2. The role of planning in infrastructure
development


Rapid economic transformation is unlikely to occur 
spontaneously, and throughout the twentieth century 
successful countries have relied on planning by the 
state to “initiate, spur, and steer economic develop-
ment”  (Myrdal,  1970:  175), whether  in  centrally 
planned regimes, mixed economies or largely market-
based  private  investment  dominated  economies. 
However, from the late twentieth century, planning 
went into decline as a state tool for economic trans-
formation, except in East Asian economies. Recently 
it  has  staged  something  of  a  comeback,  as more 
developing countries are discovering the long-term 
costs of unplanned growth.


Planning  involves  a wide  range  of  choices,  from 
what sectors to prioritize and technologies to adopt, 
to the degree of macro coordination of investment 
decisions,  to  the  amount  of  resources  required 
and how to mobilize them (Chandrasekhar, 2016). 
Infrastructure planning is likely to assume different 
forms in different contexts, so plans need to be based 
on economic, social and geographical realities and 
aspirations, rather than any pre-established blueprint 
to guarantee a successful outcome. The design and 
execution of an infrastructure plan should take into 
account a country’s stage of development, existing 
infrastructure, industrial capabilities and expansion 
plans,  urban versus  rural  divides,  levels  of  policy 
ambition, existing infrastructure institutions and their 
coordination, availability of new financial, technical 
or other resources and the existence of political and
managerial capacity for effective implementation.


Therefore,  infrastructure planning  that fits broadly 
into a national economic development strategy would 
include the following elements:


•  a vision for the infrastructure sector in the long 
term in the context of the broader national indus-
trial development strategy;




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


124


• a consistent time frame to allow for coordination
of infrastructure planning with other goals of
development planning;


• a life-cycle analysis that allows for feedbacks and
improvements and that takes into consideration
broader economic and social benefits (market
access, poverty alleviation);


• flexibility to respond to possible technological
forecasts and potential disruptions or to path-
changing contingencies such as the need to
promote green technologies as a result of climate
change;


• a systemic approach that addresses sectoral inter-
dependencies; and


• coordination between different government lev-
els and departments.


Some models of infrastructure planning guidelines
have been developed in recent years with the purpose
of providing a road map to national governments.22
These guidelines present additional aspects to those
just outlined, such as:


• setting up an adequately staffed central infra-
structure unit, under the supervision of the prime
minister or president to ensure projects are pre-
pared and executed;


• understanding of the current infrastructure
situation and preparation of a list of gaps and
deficiencies that need to be addressed;


• looking for solutions with the largest economic
and social benefits while minimizing negative
social and environmental outcomes;


• laying out the framework and modalities for
private sector participation; and


• moving from planning to action by publishing
the plan, ensuring the necessary policy changes
for the selected projects and finalizing detailed
project preparation.


The Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA)
defines project preparation as “a process which com-
prises the entire set of activities undertaken to take a
project from conceptualization to actual implementa-
tion” (ICA, 2014: 2). But various obstacles to (and
shortcomings of) infrastructure project preparation
have been identified in recent years, including lack
of coordination; lack of funding to cover the project
preparation costs, which could be between 3 per
cent and 12 per cent of total project costs; lack of


institutional and human capacity for planning, project
appraisal and preparation; overly rigid and myopic
budgeting, which can limit multi-year costing and
thus inclusion of large and long-term projects; a dis-
connect between decentralized project planning and
overall fiscal targets and plans; and lack of a robust
public investment management process to deal with
the complex interplay between politics and planning
(Fay et al., 2017; AfDB, 2018).


Focusing on planning more broadly, Alberti (2015)
identifies further shortcomings from country case
studies in Latin America, including: lack of inter-
sectoral planning; narrow cost–benefit analysis that
does not take account of project linkages or exter-
nalities and the requirements of regional or sectoral
development; failures to anticipate social reactions;
no penalties if a national development plan is not
followed through; inadequate time for planning
activities in public entities crowded out by portfo-
lio administration time; lack of specialists to assist
the public sector and poaching of human resources
from the public sector during growth phases, when
project preparation is needed most due to growing
demand for infrastructure services. Looking at both
developed and developing-country experiences with
large infrastructure projects, Flyvbjerg (2009, 2007)
makes the additional point that such projects tend to
be characterized by cost overruns, benefit shortfalls
and underestimation of risks. In his assessment, much
of this has to do with perverse incentives whereby
planners deliberately miscalculate costs and benefits
to have their projects approved. However, this assess-
ment is project-based and therefore appears not to
include the linkages and externalities.


In the early stages of planning, some critical features
for success include: clear political support from
the top; better coordination between governmental
agencies and departments; the recognition of sec-
toral interdependencies; the generation of political
consensus of a kind that incorporates demands
from weaker stakeholders; better staffed planning
units for effective design of projects; and feasibility
studies that take into account broader development
benefits. In the later planning stages, a multi-year
budgetary approach is necessary to reduce disrup-
tion. Procurement practices could be used as a
tool to strengthen industry linkages, in addition to
serving the purpose of cost reductions. Studart and
Ramos (forthcoming 2019) highlight the positive
role played by national development banks through
their planning capacity, financial clout and available




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


125


instruments, including taking projects off the ground 
and contributing to the build-up of an infrastructure 
financing architecture with cross-party support.


It is likely that de-emphasizing the “bankability” of 
projects would reduce much of the complexity and 
costs in infrastructure planning, since the financial 
arrangements needed to bring the private sector on-
board are unduly complicated. The costs  involved 
are not just those of fees for banks or consultants on 
financial engineering, or upfront financial incentives 
but, equally important, the contingent liabilities that 
build up in the course of a project (TDR 2016). The 
latter are hard to anticipate fully, often impacting on 
future fiscal capacity to maintain support for infra-
structure development.


3. Experiences with national development
plans: Country evidence


Since  the early 2000s, many developing countries 
have started to prepare and publish national devel-
opment plans. These  initiatives do not necessarily 
imply that countries rigorously stick to each of their 
provisions, but rather indicate a vision which coun-
tries may want to pursue in terms of their national
trajectories. Many countries initially produced these 
as a follow-up to national (or poverty-reduction) strat-
egies under IMF–World Bank funded programmes, 
with uncertain government commitment or resources 
for  effective  implementation. At  the  same  time, 
under  the  broader  frameworks  of  the Millennium 
Development  Goals  and  now  the  Sustainable 
Development Goals, these plans have evolved and 
in many cases appear to be taking the form of incipi-
ent, broad-based national efforts to build a coherent 
development strategy. Their underlying motivations 
seem based on the growing understanding that only 
through  development  planning will  developing 
countries be able to accelerate growth, develop their 
productive capacities and achieve greater economic 
diversification.


This subsection looks at national plans of 40 devel-
oping  countries,  elaborated  from  the beginning of 
this millennium, to assess how they fare in terms of 
including infrastructure plans and the extent to which 
they address questions of structural change, linkages 
and productivity growth.


Ninety  per  cent  of  all  the  40  national  develop-
ment plans considered here contain some sort of


infrastructure plan. The infrastructure plans are then 
assessed with respect to their vision of the country’s 
infrastructure into the next 20–30 years, whether the 
plans are comprehensive or focused, which sectors 
are covered, and if the links to other policy objectives 
such as industrialization and economic diversifica-
tion are clearly stated. Other aspects covered include 
these questions: Is there a clearly designated central-
ized decision-making unit or agency? Do countries 
identify clear funding sources and adopt a multi-year 
budget approach? Is the role for the private sector, 
international  donors  or  agencies  specified,  and  to 
what extent? Are  review mechanisms present? Do 
the  plans  address  specific  constraints,  such  as  in 
the areas of  skills,  resources,  capacity,  legislation, 
environmental impacts and financing sources? Is a 
detailed pipeline of projects provided, and life-cycle 
analysis of project preparation? Do projects take into 
account productive linkages and externalities, going 
beyond traditional cost–benefit analysis?


FIGURE 4.11 Infrastructure planning:
Country evidence
(Percentage of total)


Source: UNCTAD secretariat calculations, based on national development
plans (or strategies) of 40 countries.


Note: These countries are: Africa: Botswana, Burkina Faso, Chad,
Ethiopia, the Gambia, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi,
Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, South Africa, Uganda, United
Republic of Tanzania and Zambia. Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh,
Bhutan, Cambodia, Fiji, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the
Philippines, Solomon Islands, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey,
Vanuatu, Viet Nam and Timor-Leste. Latin America and the
Caribbean: Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Colombia, Ecuador,
Guatemala, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and
Costa Rica.


0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100


Infrastructure plan
Alignment


Roles for public-private sector planning
Link with industrialization


Integrated approach
Vision


Clear funding sources
Medium-term targets
Review mechanisms


Role for donors
Pipeline of projects


Financing source constraints
Infra interdependencies
Environmental impacts


Central decision making
Human resource constraints


Political economy constraints
Project prep: productive linkages


Multi-year budget


National plans/strategies meeting
listed criteria




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


126


The  results  of  the  assessment  are  summarized  in 
figure 4.11. While these cannot provide evidence on 
implementation within countries, they nevertheless 
provide an indication of how extensive such national
plans are,  in  terms of  their  levels of coverage and 
depth. Overall, plans score well in terms of vision, 
alignment with  the broader  country’s  strategy  and 
links with policy goals such as industrialization or 
productive diversification. Most plans also identify 
clear funding sources and a role for the private sector 
in infrastructure development. However, these plans 
score considerably less well beyond these broad
features. Less than 40 per cent of such plans address 
the important issue of infrastructure interdependen-
cies, just above 20 per cent make clear references to 
central decision-making and only about 15 per cent 
include multi-year  budgets.  In  addition,  less  than 
40 per  cent of  such plans,  and  in  some cases  less 
than 20 per cent, address different sorts of constraints 
such as in the areas of skills, environmental impacts 
or sources of finance.


Even where  assessment  is more  positive,  such  as 
in  the  areas  of  vision,  alignment  and  links with 


industrialization/diversification goals, a more detailed 
reading of the plans suggests that: visions are not fully 
developed or  really  long  term or do not anticipate 
possible challenges (of technological nature, other) 
or obstacles; alignment does not specify the chan-
nels through which infrastructure development may 
support a broader development strategy; and  links 
with industrialization/diversification do not clearly 
articulate how development of certain types of infra-
structure might lead to the latter, lacking description 
of specific linkage identification or which tools might 
be needed to establish such linkages.


Experiences with infrastructure development in the
recent past might have been richer on the ground than 
the infrastructure plans surveyed convey. However, if 
these plans do capture the level of governments’ com-
mitment to infrastructure planning and development, 
then  considerably more work  is  needed,  for  both 
more robust national infrastructure and development
strategies, to ensure infrastructure development does 
play the fundamental role it can have in transforming 
developing economies.


Managing structural transformation is a big challenge 
at all levels of development. In part, that is because 
the mixture of creative and destructive forces accom-
panying such a transformation do not automatically 
translate into a virtuous growth circle while the rents 
that are inevitably created in the process can be
captured by a privileged group in ways that clog the 
economic arteries and increase the dangers of a politi-
cal stroke. There are already signs of this happening 
with  the  digital  revolution. However,  this  is  not 
inevitable and if history is any guide, public policy, 
including industrial policy, can help to manage more 
inclusive and sustainable outcomes. The chapter III 
set out some elements of that agenda.


This chapter has argued that structural transformation 
will also need to be accompanied by infrastructure
planning. However, even as the funding for infrastruc-
ture has begun  to  recover after decades of decline, 
serious discussion of what is needed to effectively
embed infrastructure programmes in a development 


E. Conclusion


strategy has not followed. Indeed, even when infra-
structure has been  included  in national plans,  there 
does not appear to be any clear framework for moving 
from ambition  to  implementation. This disconnect 
is in part the result of a singular ideological drive to 
limit the infrastructure challenge to a matter of project 
bankability, leaving it solely in the hands of finance 
ministries. But it also reflects a reluctance on the part 
of governments in developing countries to think about 
the challenge in a more comprehensive and integrated 
manner and to invest in the techniques, skills and insti-
tutional capacities required to ensure that infrastructure
will not  just build bridges but ensure  those bridges 
deliver on the ambitions of the 2030 Agenda. In that 
respect, the chapter has suggested that the old debate 
between balanced and unbalanced growth provides a 
rich discussion for thinking about those techniques, 
skills and institutional requirements. The bottom line 
when it comes to infrastructure spending is that it is 
too important a development matter to be left to the
sole responsibility of finance ministries.




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


127


1  A  good  is  non-excludable  if  people  cannot  be 
excluded from consuming it because of non-payment 
or other criteria and it is non-rivalrous if its consump-
tion by one person does not prevent others from
consuming it.


2  According to Markard, 2011: table 3, capital intensity 
is judged as very high in electricity and water supply, 
sanitation and road transport; regulation intensity as 
stronger in water and sanitation; systemic importance 
is highest in electricity supply, railway transport and 
telecommunications, and public-sector dominance 
is found in water supply and sanitation, and railway 
and road transport.


3 Telecommunications infrastructure is often inter-
twined with digital infrastructure, but as chapter III 
indicated,  digital  infrastructure  contains  several 
additional components.


4  This is contrary to the argument made in some recent 
literature, that infrastructure investment can crowd 
out  private  investment  (see Agénor  and Moreno-
Dodson, 2006, for example).


5  For  instance, Africa  has  a  power  infrastructure 
investment  backlog  of  over US$40  billion  and 
the world’s lowest electrification rate with around 
30.5 per  cent  (Odey and Falola, 2017; Nyambati, 
2017). So any additional infrastructure investment 
in electricity in Africa can be expected to have sig-
nificant effects on growth, private economic activity 
and conditions of life.


6 The Economist,  2017,  based  on World  Bank 
calculations.


7 Laid  out  in  Chevalier’s  book  Système de la
Méditerranée, 1836.


8  The Republic of Korea’s first five-year development 
plan (1962–1966) identified infrastructure as key to 
support the development of light industries, focusing 
on the construction of 275 km of railway and many 
highway projects (Ro, 2002). In the third five-year 
plan (1972–1976), there were comprehensive pro-
grammes  to  develop  airports,  seaports,  highways, 
railways and telecommunications (Ro, 2002). Such 
coordinated infrastructure expansion continued
through the subsequent decades, particularly in the 
1990s to deal with the emerging extreme infrastruc-
ture congestion.


9 This can be contrasted with sluggish public infra-
structure investment in India, which has held back 
the private sector, while in China it has lent a much-
needed boost to stimulate demand (Shi et al., 2017).


10  For  example, when  the Republic  of Korea  faced 
additional  infrastructure  pressures,  the  Private 
Capital Inducement Act of the Republic of Korea was 
formally launched in 1994. This set out the frame-
work  conditions  for  private  sector  investment  in 
infrastructure provision (World Bank, 2009). The Act 
identified two categories of investments – strategic 


infrastructures  (roads,  railways,  subways,  ports, 
airports, water supply and telecommunications) and 
other infrastructure projects, including gas supply, 
bus  terminals,  tourism promotion  areas  and  sport 
complexes (World Bank, 2009) but the state retained 
its overseer role in both.


11  These figures are adjusted for sector coverage, are 
for the period 2016–2030 and are expressed in 2015 
United  States  dollars.  The  sources  are: OECD, 
2017a; Bhattacharya  et  al.,  2016; Woetzel  et  al., 
2016; NCE, 2014. As a proportion of global GDP, 
these figures are in the range 4.8 per cent to 8.3 per 
cent, assuming global GDP grows in real terms over 
the years 2016–2023 according to projected rates of 
IMF WEO Database April 2018 and then at 3 per 
cent over 2024–2030. These proportions might be 
compared against investment estimates presented by 
Woetzel et al. (2016) at 3.5 per cent of global GDP 
in the past two decades.


12  According to the Global Commission on the Economy 
and Climate, sustainable infrastructure means, first, 
that infrastructure is socially sustainable, by: being 
inclusive  and  contributing  to  people’s  livelihoods 
and social well-being; and supporting the needs of 
the poor and reducing their vulnerability to climate 
shocks. Second, that it is economically sustainable, 
whereby it creates jobs and boosts growth but does 
not create unsustainable debt burdens for the govern-
ment or high costs for users. And, third, that it should 
be environmentally sustainable by limiting pollution, 
supporting conservation and the sustainable use of 
natural resources, contributing to a low-carbon and 
resource-efficient economy and withstanding climate 
change impacts (NCE, 2016: 22).


13 Some estimates comprise only capital investment
while others include expenditure on operations
and maintenance  as well.  Some methodologies 
are based on sectoral analysis with consideration
of use of more efficient technologies (e.g. OECD, 
NCE) plus  a  country-by-country  assessment  (e.g. 
Woetzel et al., 2016).  In  the case of Bhattacharya 
et al. (2016: 26–28), a macro-simulation is used in 
which  current  investment  spending  is  calculated 
for  the  base  year  and  then projections  for  invest-
ment requirements are obtained using assumptions 
on expected growth and investment rates, based on 
assessments of investment plans from major econo-
mies and regions.


14  According to Woetzel et al., 2016, disruptive tech-
nologies involve new technologies such as additive 
manufacturing, advanced automation and modular 
construction, and new products and services such as 
autonomous vehicles, drone deliveries and e-com-
merce, which have the potential to drastically shift 
the demand between different sources of energy (e.g. 
from fossil fuel to renewables), reduce the demand 


Notes




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


128


for specific types of infrastructure (e.g. transport – 
roads, ports) and change how infrastructure is built, 
with  the ultimate effect of  radically reshaping  the 
infrastructure sector.


15 These estimates of investment needs are at constant
prices and comprise power, transport, telecommu-
nications, water and sanitation; and exclude invest-
ment required for climate change. Actual investment 
is based on latest available year (UNCTAD, 2014: 
142). Bhattacharya provides an alternative estimate 
for developing countries, of $3.5 trillion–$4 trillion 
(at 2015 dollars) per year over the period 2016–2030, 
against actual infrastructure investment at $2.2 tril-
lion  in  2014, with  China  alone  accounting  for 
$1.3 trillion (Bhattacharya et al., 2016: 21–28).


 16  These  figures  exclude  expenditures  on  operation 
and maintenance and include additional invest-
ment needed to make investments sustainable. See 
Bhattacharya et al., 2012.


17  Other estimates of infrastructure investment needs 
for the LAC region fall  in the range 3 per cent to 
8 per cent of GDP, against actual spending at 2.8 per 
cent (Fay et al., 2017: table ES1 and box table 1). 
Serebrisky et al., 2015, and Serebrisky, 2014, draw-
ing on a range of studies, suggest needs of 5 per cent 
of GDP.


18  In United States dollar terms, the AfDB, 2018: 64, 
puts the infrastructure needs for Africa at between 
$130 billion and $170 billion a year, and a financ-
ing  gap  of  $68  billion  to  $108  billion.  Previous 
estimates,  produced  by  the Africa  Infrastructure 
Country Diagnostic, indicated needs of $93 billion 


a year in 2008, with a financing gap at $31 billion 
(AfDB, 2018: 64, 2013: 7).


19  That Report attempts to provide “objective” meas-
ures of business regulations and their enforcement 
across  190  economies  and  selected  cities. Higher 
values on  the  index are  taken  to  indicate “better” 
(usually  simpler  and more  liberal)  regulations  for 
businesses  and  stronger  protection  of  property 
rights, and these results have been used to influence 
policymakers  to move  towards  liberalizing  rules, 
often without appropriate recognition of the context 
or broader development considerations. There has 
been much criticism of both the choice of indicators
and the manner of measurement (typically based
on interviews conducted in one city of the country
concerned) not just from civil society but from the 
Independent Panel appointed by the President of the 
World Bank and headed by Trevor Manuel, former 
Finance Minister  of  South Africa  (World Bank, 
2013).


20  This portion of public finance comes from develop-
ment banks, export credit agencies and other public 
authorities and companies (Fay et al., 2017: 20).


 21  As an example, a recent study on understanding the 
regional growth determinants in the European Union 
between 1995 and 2010 concluded that transport and 
telecommunications investments have a non-linear
relationship with  growth  in  the European Union 
countries (Sanso-Navarro and Vera-Cabello, 2015).


 22 Some of these are elaborated in Bhattacharya et al., 
2016; Schweikert and Chinowsky, 2012; WEF and 
PWC, 2012; Alberti, 2015.


ADB (2017). Meeting Asia’s infrastructure needs. Asian 
Development Bank. Available at: https://www.adb.
org/publications/asia-infrastructure-needs.


AfDB (2013). An Integrated Approach to Infrastructure
Provision in Africa.  Statistics Department, Africa 
Infrastructure Knowledge Program. April. African 
Development Bank. Abidjan.


AfDB (2018). African Economic Outlook 2018. African 
Development Bank. Abidjan.


Agénor PR (2010). A theory of infrastructure-led develop-
ment? Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. 
34(5): 932–950.


Agénor P-R and Moreno-Dodson B (2006). Public infra-
structure  and  growth: New  channels  and  policy 
implications. Policy Research Working Paper Series 
No. 4064. World Bank.


Alberti J (2015). Pre-Investment in Infrastructure in Latin
America and the Caribbean: Case Studies from


References


Chile, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay. Inter-American 
Development Bank. Washington, D.C.


Allcott H, Collard-Wexler A and O’Connell, SD (2016). How 
do electricity shortages affect industry? Evidence from 
India. American Economic Review. 106(3): 587–624.


Ambrosius G and Henrich-Franke C (2016). Integration of
Infrastructures in Europe in Historical Comparison. 
Springer International Publishing. Cham.


Andrés LA, Schwartz J and Guasch JL (2013). Uncovering
the Drivers of Utility Performance: Lessons from
Latin America and the Caribbean on the Role of
the Private Sector, Regulation, and Governance in
the Power, Water, and Telecommunication Sectors. 
World Bank. Washington, D.C.


Arndt HW (1987). Economic Development: The History of
an Idea. University of Chicago Press. Chicago, IL.


Aschauer DA (1989). Is public expenditure productive? 
Journal of Monetary Economics. 23(2): 177–200.




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


129


Aschauer DA  (1990). Why  is  infrastructure  important? 
In: Munnell AH, ed. Is There a Shortfall in Public
Capital Investment? Federal Reserve Bank of Bos-
ton. Boston, MA: 21–50.


Atack  J, Bateman F, Haines M and Margo RA  (2010). 
Did  railroads  induce or  follow economic growth? 
Urbanization and population growth in the Ameri-
can Midwest, 1850–1860. Social Science History. 
34(2): 171–197.


Bang M-K  (2003). Fiscal  policy  in Korea  for  building 
infrastructure  and  its  knowledge  based  economy. 
Presentation made  at  the World Bank-Vietnam-
Korea Conference on Public Expenditure. 9 October. 
Available at: https://slideplayer.com/slide/6321423/.


Bhattacharya A, Meltzer JP, Oppenheim J, Qureshi Z and 
Stern N  (2016). Delivering on Sustainable Infra-
structure for Better Development and Better Climate.
December. Global  Economy  and Development. 
Brookings Institute. Washington, D.C.


Bhattacharya A, Romani M and Stern N (2012). Infrastruc-
ture for development: Meeting the challenge. Centre 
for Climate Change Economics and Policy. Policy 
Paper. Grantham Research  Institute  on Climate 
Change and the Environment in collaboration with 
G-24 Inter-Governmental Group of Twenty Four. 


Bom PRD and Ligthart JE (2014). What have we learned 
from three decades of research on the productivity
of public capital? Journal of Economic Surveys. 
28(5): 889–916.


Bröcker  J  and Rietveld  P  (2009).  Infrastructure  and 
regional development. In: Capello R and Nijkamp 
P, eds. Handbook of Regional Growth and Develop-
ment Theories. Edward Elgar. Cheltenham: 152–181.


Calderón C and Servén L (2010). Infrastructure and eco-
nomic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Journal
of African Economies. 19(S1): i13–i87.


Calderón C and Servén L (2014). Infrastructure, growth 
and inequality: An overview. Policy Research Work-
ing Paper No. 7034. World Bank.


Calderón C, Moral-Benito E  and  Servén L  (2011).  Is 
infrastructure  capital  productive? A dynamic  het-
erogeneous approach. Documentos de Trabajo No. 
1103. Banco de España.


Cassis Y, De Luca G and Florio M (2016). The history of 
infrastructure finance: An analytical framework. In: 
Cassis Y, De Luca G and Florio M, eds. Infrastruc-
ture Finance in Europe: Insights into the History of
Water, Transport and Telecommunications. Oxford 
University Press. Oxford: 1–38.


Chandrasekhar CP  (2016). Development  planning.  In: 
Reinert ES, Ghosh J and Kattel R, eds. Handbook
of Alternative Theories of Economic Development. 
Edward Elgar. Cheltenham: 519–532.


Chevalier M  (1836). Lettres sur L’Amérique de Nord. 
Volume 1. Charles Gosselin. Paris.


Cooper F (1993). Africa and the world economy. In: Coop-
er F, Mallon FE, Stern SJ Isaacman AF and Rose-
berry W,  eds. Confronting Historical Paradigms:


Peasants, Labor and the Capitalist World System in
Africa and Latin America. University of Wisconsin 
Press. Madison.


Cootner, PH (1963). The role of the railroads in United 
States economic growth. The Journal of Economic
History. 23(4): 477–521.


Czarnecki C and Dietze C (2017). Reference Architecture
for the Telecommunications Industry: Transforma-
tion of Strategy, Organization, Processes, Data, and
Applications.  Springer  International  Publishing. 
Cham.


Deloitte (2017). 2017 Telecommunications Industry Out-
look. Deloitte Development LLC.


Deng T (2013). Impacts of transport infrastructure on pro-
ductivity and economic growth: Recent advances and 
research challenges. Transport Reviews: A Transna-
tional Transdisciplinary Journal. 33(6): 686–699.


Dissou Y and Didic S (2013). Infrastructure and growth. 
In: Cockburn J, Dissou Y, Duclos J-Y and Tiberti 
L.  Infrastructure and Economic Growth in Asia. 
Springer International Publishing. Cham: 5–46.


Donaldson D  (2010). Railroads  of  the Raj: Estimating 
the  impact  of  transportation  infrastructure. Work-
ing Paper Series. No.  16487. National Bureau  of 
Economic Research.


Douhan R and Nordberg A (2007). Is the elephant step-
ping on its trunk? The problem of India’s unbalanced 
growth. Working Paper Series No. 2007:16. Depart-
ment of Economics, Uppsala University. Available 
at: https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/uunewp/2007_016.
html.


Drolet M  (2015). A  nineteenth-century Mediterranean 
union: Michael Chevalier’s Système de la Médi-
terranée. Mediterranean Historical Review. 30(2): 
147–168.


ECLAC  (2017).  Infrastructure  investment  in  Latin 
American  and Caribbean  countries  remain  below 
the  needs  of  the  region.  ECLAC Press Release. 
15 May. Available  at:  https://www.cepal.org/en/
noticias/inversion-infraestructura-paises-america-
latina-caribe-se-mantiene-debajo-necesidades-la.


Elburz Z, Nijkamp P  and Pels E  (2017).  Public  infra-
structure and regional growth: Lessons from meta-
analysis. Journal of Transport Geography. 58: 1–8.


Escribano A and Guasch JL (2005). Assessing the impact 
of  investment climate on productivity using firm-
level data: Methodology and the cases of Guatemala, 
Honduras, and Nicaragua. Policy Research Working 
Paper No. 3621. World Bank.


Escribano A and Guasch JL (2008). Robust methodology 
for investment climate assessment on productivity:
Application to investment climate surveys from Cen-
tral America. Working Paper No. 08–19. Economic 
Series (11). Universidad Carlos III de Madrid.


Escribano A, Guasch JL and Pena J (2010). Assessing the 
impact of infrastructure quality on firm productiv-
ity in Africa: Cross-country comparisons based on 
investment  climate  surveys  from  1999  to  2005. 




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


130


Policy Research Working Paper No.  5191. World 
Bank.


Estache A  (2006).  Infrastructure: A  survey  of  recent 
and upcoming issues. The World Bank Infrastruc-
ture Vice-Presidency,  and Poverty Reduction  and 
Economic Management Vice-Presidency. World 
Bank. Available at: http://siteresources.worldbank.
org/INTDECABCTOK2006/Resources/Antonio_
Estache_Infrastructure_for_Growth.pdf.


Estache A  (2010).  Infrastructure finance  in  developing 
countries: An  overview. EIB Papers No.  8/2010. 
European Investment Bank.


Estache A and Fay M (2009). Current debates on infra-
structure policy. Policy Research Working Paper No. 
4410. World Bank.


Estache A and Garsous G (2012). The impact of infrastruc-
ture on growth in developing countries. Economic 
Notes. Note 1. International Finance Corporation.


Fay M, Andres LA,  Fox C, Narloch U,  Straub S  and 
Slawson M  (2017). Rethinking Infrastructure in
Latin America and the Caribbean: Spending Better
to Achieve More. World Bank. Washington, D.C.


Fleming M (1955). External economies and the doctrine 
of balanced growth. The Economic Journal. 65(258): 
241–256.


Flyvbjerg  B  (2007).  Policy  and  planning  for  large-
infrastructure  projects:  Problems,  causes,  cures. 
Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design. 
34(4): 578–597.


Flyvbjerg B (2009). Survival of the unfittest: Why the worst 
infrastructure gets built – and what we can do about it. 
Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 25(3): 344–367.


G20  (2011).  Supporting  Infrastructure  in Developing 
Countries.  Submission  to  the G20  by  the MDB 
Working Group  on  Infrastructure.  June. Avail-
able  at:  http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/
en/297061468343728311/pdf/655610BR0v20Se0
Official0Use0Only090.pdf.


Ghosh M (2012). Regional economic growth and inequal-
ity in India during the pre- and post-reform periods. 
Oxford Development Studies. 40(2): 190–212.


Global Water  Partnership  (2009).  Investing  in  infra-
structure: The value of an IWRM approach. Policy 
Brief No.  7. Technical Committee. Global Water 
Partnership.


Gomory RE and Baumol WJ (2000). Global Trade and
Conflicting National Interests. MIT Press. Cam-
bridge MA.


Gramlich EM (1994). Infrastructure investment: A review 
essay.  Journal of Economic Literature.  32(3): 
1176–1196.


Grigg NS (2017). Global water infrastructure: State of the 
art review. International Journal of Water Resources
Development. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/
07900627.2017.1401919.


Haldane AG  (2018).  Ideas  and  institutions: A  growth 
story. Bank of England. Speech given at the Univer-
sity of Oxford. 23 May. Available at: https://www.


bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/speech/2018/
ideas-and-institutions-a-growth-story-speech-by-
andy-haldane.pdf?la=en&hash=BDF87B794BCE9
110D264BF955E43C1D7A533E593.


Hausmann R, Rodrik D and Sabel CF (2008). Reconfigur-
ing industrial policy: A framework with an applica-
tion to South Africa. Working Paper No. 168. Center 
for International Development. Harvard University.


Heathcote, C  (2017). Forecasting  infrastructure  invest-
ment needs for 50 countries, 7 sectors through 2040. 
19 September. Global  Infrastructure Outlook  and 
Oxford Economics. Available at: https://www.gihub.
org/blog/forecasting-infrastructure-investment-
needs-for-50-countries-7-sectors-through-2040/.


Henckel T and McKibbin WJ (2010). The economics of
infrastructure in a globalized world: Issues, lessons 
and future challenges. 4 June. Brookings Institute. 
Washington, D.C. Available at: https://www.brook-
ings.edu/research/the-economics-of-infrastructure-
in-a-globalized-world-issues-lessons-and-future-
challenges/.


Hirschman AO (1958). The Strategy of Economic Develop-
ment. Yale University Press. New Haven, CT.


Hirschman AO (1961). Latin American Issues: Essays and
Comments. Twentieth Century Fund. New York, NY.


Hirschman AO (1987). The political  economy of Latin 
American development: Seven  exercises  in  retro-
spection. Latin American Research Review. 22(3): 
7–36.


Hjort J and Poulsen J (2017). The arrival of fast Internet 
and  employment  in Africa. Working  Paper No. 
23582. National Bureau of Economic Research.


Högselius  P, Kaijser A  and  van  der Vleuten E  (2015). 
Europe’s Infrastructure Transition: Economy, War,
Nature. Palgrave Macmillan. Basingstoke.


Holtz-Eakin D (1994). Public-sector capital and the pro-
ductivity puzzle. Review of Economics and Statistics. 
76(1): 12–21.


Holz CA (2011). The unbalanced growth hypothesis and 
the role of the state: The case of China’s state-owned 
enterprises.  Journal of Development Economics. 
96(2): 220–238.


ICA  (2014).  Effective  project  preparation  for Africa’s 
infrastructure  development. Concept Paper.  Infra-
structure Consortium  for Africa Annual Meeting. 
Cape Town. November. 


Ingram GK and Fay M (2008). Physical infrastructure. In: 
Dutt AK and Ros J, eds. International Handbook of
Development Economics. Volume 1. Edward Elgar. 
Cheltenham: 301–315.


Jenks  LH  (1944). Railroads  as  an  economic  force  in 
American development. The Journal of Economic
History. 4(1): 1–20.


Jenks LH (1951). Capital movement and transportation: 
Britain  and American  railway  development. The
Journal of Economic History. 11(4): 375–388.


Jiwattanakulpaisarn P, Noland RB and Graham DJ (2012). 
Marginal  productivity  of  expanding  highway 




BRIDGING GAPS OR WIDENING DIVIDES: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION


131


capacity.  Journal of Transport Economics and
Policy. 46(3): 333–347.


Kasper E (2015). A definition for infrastructure: Charac-
teristics and  their  impact on firms active  in  infra-
structure. PhD dissertation. Technische Universität 
München. February.


Lakshmanan TR  (2011). The broader  economic  conse-
quences  of  transport  infrastructure  investments. 
Journal of Transport Geography. 19(1): 1–12.


Lenz L, Munyehirwe A, Peters J and Sievert M (2017). 
Does  large-scale  infrastructure  investment  allevi-
ate poverty? Impact of Rwanda’s electricity access 
roll-out program. World Development. 89: 88–110.


Markard J (2011). Infrastructure sector characteristics and 
implications  for  innovation  and  sectoral  change. 
Journal of Infrastructure Systems. 17(3): 107–117.


Marshall T  (2013). Planning Major Infrastructure: A
Critical Analysis. Routledge. Abingdon.


Meek J (2014). Private Island: Why Britain Now Belongs
To Someone Else. Verso. London.


Melo PC, Graham DJ  and Brage-Ardao R  (2013). The 
productivity of transport infrastructure investment:
A meta-analysis  of  empirical  evidence. Regional
Science and Urban Economics. 43(5): 695–706.


Mesquita Moreira M, Blyde JS, Volpe Martincus C and 
Molina D  (2013). Too  far  to  export:  Domestic 
transport  costs  and  regional  export  disparities  in 
Latin America  and  the Caribbean. Special Report 
on Integration and Trade. Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank. Available at: https://publications.iadb.
org/handle/11319/3664.


Moyo B (2013). Power infrastructure quality and manufac-
turing productivity in Africa: A firm level analysis. 
Energy Policy. 61: 1063–1070.


Myrdal G (1957). Economic Theory and Under-developed
Regions. G. Duckworth. London.


Myrdal G  (1970). An Approach to the Asian Drama:
Methodological and Theoretical. Vintage Books 
Edition. New York, NY.


NCE  (2014). Better Growth, Better Climate: The New
Climate Economy Report. New Climate Economy. 
Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. 
Washington, D.C.


NCE (2016). The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative:
Financing for Better Growth and Development – The
2016 New Climate Economy Report. New Climate 
Economy. Global Commission on the Economy and 
Climate. Washington, D.C.


Nerlove M  (1966). Railroads  and American  economic 
growth. The Journal of Economic History.  26(1): 
107–115.


Nordås HK and Piermartini R (2004). Infrastructure and 
trade.  Staff Working  Paper No.  ERSD-2004-04. 
World Trade Organization.


Nurkse R  (1953). Problems of Capital Formation in
Underdeveloped Countries. Blackwell. Oxford.


Nyambati AR (2017). Scaling up power infrastructure in 
sub-Saharan Africa for poverty alleviation. In: Falola 


T and Odey MO, eds. Poverty Reduction Strategies
for Africa. Routledge. Abingdon: 53–64.


Odey MO and Falola T (2017). Introduction. In: Falola 
T and Odey MO, eds. Poverty Reduction Strategies
for Africa. Routledge. Abingdon: 1–18.


OECD  (2017a). Technical  note  on  estimates  of  infra-
structure investment needs: Background note to the 
report Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth. 
July. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and 
Development. Paris. Available at: https://www.oecd.
org/env/cc/g20-climate/Technical-note-estimates-of-
infrastructure-investment-needs.pdf.


OECD (2017b). Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth. 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Devel-
opment. Paris.


Pascali L (2017). The wind of change: Maritime technol-
ogy,  trade  and  economic  development. American
Economic Review. 107(9): 2821–2854.


Pereira RM, Hausman WJ and Pereira AM (2014). Rail-
roads and economic growth in the antebellum United 
States. Working Paper No. 153. College of William 
and Mary. Williamsburg, VA.


Priemus H and van Wee B (2013). Mega-projects: High 
ambitions,  complex  decision- making,  different 
actors, multiple impacts. In: Priemus H and van Wee 
B, eds. International Handbook on Mega-Projects. 
Edward Elgar. Cheltenham: 1–8.


Ro J (2002). Infrastructure development in Korea. Paper 
prepared for the PEO Structure Specialists Meeting. 
Infrastructure Development  in  the Pacific Region. 
Osaka. 23–24 September. Available at: http://unpan1.
un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/APCITY/
UNPAN008650.pdf.


Rodney W (1973). How Europe Underdeveloped Africa. 
Bogle-L’Ouverture Publications. London.


Rohatyn F (2009). Bold Endeavors: How Our Government
Built America, and Why It Must Rebuild Now. Simon 
and Schuster. New York, NY.


Rosenstein-Rodan PN (1943). Problems of industrialisa-
tion of Eastern and South-Eastern Europe. Economic
Journal. 53(210/211): 202–211.


Sanso-Navarro M and Vera-Cabello M (2015). Non-linear-
ities in regional growth: A non-parametric approach. 
Papers in Regional Science. 94(S1): S19–S38.


Schmidt-Traub G  (2015).  Investment  needs  to  achieve 
the Sustainable Development Goals: Understanding 
the  billions  and  trillions. Working Paper, Version 
2. Sustainable Development Solutions Network. A 
Global Initiative for the United Nations. Available 
at: unsdsn.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/151112-
SDG-Financing-Needs.pdf.


Schweikert A and Chinowsky P (2012). National infrastruc-
ture planning: A holistic approach to policy develop-
ment in developing countries. Engineering Project 
Organizations Conference. Rheden. 10–12 July. Avail-
able at: https://www.academia.edu/2755320/Nation-
al_Infrastructure_Planning_A_Holistic_Approach_
to_Policy_Development_in_Developing_Countries.




TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2018: POWER, PLATFORMS AND THE FREE TRADE DELUSION


132


Serebrisky T (2014). Sustainable Infrastructure for Com-
petitiveness and Inclusive Growth. Inter-American 
Development Bank. Washington, D.C.


Serebrisky T, Suárez-Alemán A, Margot D and Ramirez 
MC  (2015). Financing Infrastructure in Latin
America and the Caribbean: How, How Much and
By Whom?  Inter-American Development Bank. 
Washington, D.C.


Shaw RE (2014). Canals For a Nation: The Canal Era in
the United States, 1790–1860. The University Press 
of Kentucky. Lexington, KY.


Sheahan  J  (1958).  International  specialization  and  the 
concept of balanced growth. The Quarterly Journal
of Economics. 72(2): 183–197.


Shi Y, Guo S and Sun P (2017). The role of infrastructure 
in China’s  regional  economic  growth. Journal of
Asian Economics. 49: 26–41.


Simon NS and Natarajan P (2017). Non-linearity between 
infrastructure inequality and growth: Evidence from 
India. Review of Market Integration. 9(1/2): 66–82.


Straub  S  (2008).  Infrastructure  and  development: A 
critical appraisal of the macro level literature. Policy 
Research Working Paper No. 4590. World Bank.


Streeten P (1959). Unbalanced growth. Oxford Economic
Papers. 11(2): 167–190.


Studart R  and Ramos L  (2019,  forthcoming). The new 
development banks and the financing of transforma-
tion in Latin America and the Caribbean. In: Barrow-
clough D, Gallagher KP and Kozul-Wright R, eds. 
Southern Led Development Finance: Solutions from
the Global South to Boost Resilience and Growth. 
Routledge. Abingdon.


Summers  LH  (2016).  The  age  of  secular  stagna-
tion: What  it  is  and what  to  do  about  it. Foreign
Affairs. 15 February. Available at: https://www.for-
eignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2016-02-15/
age-secular-stagnation.


Sutcliffe RB (1964). Balanced and unbalanced growth. The
Quarterly Journal of Economics. 78(4): 621–640.


The Economist  (2017). The  leapfrog model.  Special 
Report: What  technology  can  do  for Africa.  9 
November. Available  at:  http://media.economist.
com/news/special-report/21731038-technology-
africa-making-huge-advances-says-jonathan-
rosenthal-its-full.


Torrisi G (2009). Public infrastructure: Definition, clas-
sification  and measurement  issues. Economics,
Management, and Financial Markets.  4(3):  100–
124. Available  at:  https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.
de/25850/.


UNCTAD (2014). World Investment Report 2014: Invest-
ing in the SDGs: An Action Plan (United Nations
publication. Sales No. E.14.II.D.1. New York and 
Geneva).


UNCTAD (2017). The Least Developed Countries Report
2017: Transformational Energy Access (United


Nations  publication.  Sales No. E.17.II.D.6. New 
York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (2018). Scaling Up Finance for the Sustainable
Development Goals: Experimenting with Models of
Multilateral Development Banking. UNCTAD/GDS/
ECIDC/2017/4. New York and Geneva.


UNCTAD (TDR 1997). Trade and Development Report,
1997: Globalization, Distribution and Growth
(United Nations publication. Sales No. E.97.II.D.8. 
New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2003). Trade and Development Report,
2003: Capital Accumulation, Growth and Structural
Change (United Nations publication. Sales No. E.03.
II.D.7. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2016). Trade and Development Report,
2016: Structural Transformation for Inclusive and
Sustained Growth (United Nations publication. Sales 
No. E.16.II.D.5. New York and Geneva).


UNCTAD (TDR 2017). Trade and Development Report,
2017: Beyond Austerity – Towards a Global New
Deal (United Nations publication. Sales No. E.17.
II.D.5. New York and Geneva).


United Nations  (2016). The  infrastructure ‒  inequality ‒ 
resilience nexus. In: Global Sustainable Development
Report. Chapter 2. United Nations. New York: 21–40.


UN-Water (2015). The United Nations World Water Devel-
opment Report 2015: Water for a Sustainable World. 
UNESCO. Paris.


Weber B, Staub-Bisang M, Alfen HW (2016). Infrastruc-
ture as an Asset Class: Investment Strategy, Sustain-
ability, Project Finance and PPPs. 2nd edn. Wiley 
Publishing. Chichester.


WEF and PWC (2012). Strategic Infrastructure: Steps to
Prioritize and Deliver Infrastructure Effectively and
Efficiently. World Economic Forum and Pricewater-
houseCoopers. Geneva.


Woetzel J, Garemo N, Mischke J, Kamra P, Palter R (2016). 
Bridging  infrastructure  gaps. McKinsey Global 
Institute. McKinsey & Company. June.


Woetzel  J, Garemo N, Mischke  J, Kamra  P,  Palter R 
(2017). Bridging infrastructure gaps: Has the world 
made progress? Discussion Paper. McKinsey Global 
Institute. October.


World Bank (2009). Country case study: Korea. In: Toolkit
for Public–Private Partnerships in Roads and High-
ways. Public Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility. 
World Bank. Washington D.C.: 81–90.


World Bank  (2013).  Independent  panel  review  of  the 
Doing Business Report.  June. Available  at:  http://
pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/237121516384849082/
doing-business-review-panel-report-June-2013.pdf.


Zhang Y, Wang X and Chen K (2013). Growth and distribu-
tive effects of public infrastructure investments in
China. In: Cockburn J, Dissou Y, Duclos J-Y and Tib-
erti L. Infrastructure and Economic Growth in Asia. 
Springer International Publishing. Cham: 87–116.




133


TDR 2017  Beyond Austerity: Towards a Global New Deal


TDR 2016  Structural Transformation for Inclusive and Sustained Growth


TDR 2015  Making the International Financial Architecture Work for Development
TDR 2014  Global Governance and Policy Space for Development


TDR 2013  Adjusting to the Changing Dynamics of the World Economy


TDR 2012  Policies for Inclusive and Balanced Growth


TDR 2011  Post-crisis Policy Challenges in the World Economy


TDR 2010  Employment, Globalization and Development


TDR 2009  Responding to the Global Crisis; Climate Change Mitigation and Development


TDR 2008  Commodity Prices, Capital Flows and the Financing of Investment


TDR 2007  Regional Cooperation for Development


TDR 2006  Global Partnership and National Policies for Development


TDR 2005  New Features of Global Interdependence


TDR 2004  Policy Coherence, Development Strategies and Integration into the World Economy


TDR 2003  Capital Accumulation, Growth and Structural Change


TDR 2002  Developing Countries in World Trade


TDR 2001  Global Trends and Prospects; Financial Architecture


TDR 2000  Global Economic Growth and Imbalances


TDR 1999  Fragile Recovery and Risks; Trade, Finance and Growth


TDR 1998  Financial Instability; Growth in Africa


TDR 1997  Globalization, Distribution and Growth


TDR 1981– 2011  Three Decades of Thinking Development


TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Past issues




EMBARGO
The contents of this Report must not
be quoted or summarized in the print,
broadcast or electronic media before
26 September 2018, 17:00 hours GMT




Login