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Wto Report on G-20 Trade Measures

Report by WTO, 2011

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This sixth Report reviews trade and trade-related measures undertaken by G-20 economies in the period from 1 May 2011 to mid-October 2011. Section II of the Report presents a comprehensive description of all trade and trade-related developments during the reviewed period. Government support measures implemented during this period are covered in section III, and developments in Trade Finance in section IV. The final section of the Report provides the context of recent economic and trade trends.




25 October 2011




REPORT ON G-20 TRADE MEASURES
(MAY TO MID-OCTOBER 2011)1




EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Political resolve to resist protectionism is under stress

Disappointingly weak growth in some G-20 countries and continuing macroeconomic imbalances
globally are testing the political resolve of many governments to abide by the G-20 commitment to
resist protectionism, as reaffirmed by the G-20 Leaders at their last Summit Meeting in Seoul. Over
the period under review, there is no indication that recourse to new trade restricting measures by the
G-20 as a group has slackened nor that efforts have been stepped up to remove existing restrictions,
particularly those introduced since the onset of the financial crisis. Moreover, there is a growing
perception that trade protectionism is gaining ground in some parts of the world as a political reaction
to current local economic difficulties – difficulties that trade restrictions are very poorly equipped to
resolve, such as the case of currency fluctuations and macroeconomic imbalances. There are various
signs of a revival in the use of industrial policy to promote national champions and of import
substitution measures to back up that policy. Unilateral actions to shield domestic industries,
although appealing from a narrow short-term perspective, will not solve global problems; on the
contrary, they may make things worse by triggering a spiral of tit-for-tat reactions in which every
country will lose.

The situation is not yet alarming, but it is clearly adding to the downside risks to the global economy.
There is a need for urgent attention by the G-20 to prevent any further deterioration in their collective
trade policy stance and to place their faith in open markets and the benefits of freer trade at the heart
of their economic policies to re-boot growth in the world economy. Taking steps to keep up the
process of trade opening is important in this context.

The occurrence of new trade restrictions is still a matter of concern

The pace of implementation of new trade restrictions by G-20 economies has not decelerated over the
past six months. The number of restrictive measures (and those that have the potential to restrict or
distort trade) introduced since the beginning of May 2011 has declined slightly to 108 down from 122
recorded during the preceding six months. Not all G-20 economies took trade restrictive measures,
and some took the welcome step of introducing new measures to facilitate trade by, for example,
reducing import tariffs. Around half of the total measures recorded over this period can be considered
as trade restrictive.



1 This is intended to be a purely factual report and is issued under the sole responsibility of the


Director-General of the WTO. The report has no legal effect on the rights and obligations of WTO Members,
nor does it have any legal implication with respect to the conformity of any measure noted in the report with any
WTO Agreement or any provision thereof. This report is without prejudice to Members' negotiating positions in
the Doha Round.




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New import restrictive measures taken during May to mid-October 2011 cover around 0.6% of total
G-20 imports, which is the same share recorded during the previous six months. Restrictive measures
affected mainly machinery and mechanical appliances, articles of iron and steel, electrical machinery
and equipment, organic chemicals, plastics, and man-made staple fibres.

Export restrictions continue on an upward trend

The previous monitoring report highlighted the upward trend in the imposition of export restrictions
by G-20 economies, affecting mainly food products and some minerals. This trend has been
confirmed over the past six months. More new measures were put in place during May to mid-
October 2011 than in the past. Although the majority of these actions were justified on the grounds of
national responses to rising food prices, to secure domestic supply, or to address resource depletion,
they nevertheless go against the G-20 standstill pledge in this respect, and have the potential to
seriously affect trading partners.

As noted in the previous report, there is a risk that, in the absence of clearer multilateral disciplines,
governments may be tempted to use export restrictions to alter to their advantage the relative price of
their exports or to expand production by domestic industries. More self-imposed discipline on the use
of export restrictions and closer multilateral cooperation is needed to mitigate the impact of these
measures on importing countries.

The removal of previous restrictions still too slow

Most of the trade restrictive measures introduced since the beginning of the trade monitoring exercise
are still applicable. Out of a total of 674 measures that can be considered as restricting or potentially
restricting trade taken since October 2008, 19% have been eliminated. At the time of the last
monitoring report in May 2011, around 18% of the 550 restrictive measures had been removed. The
removal rate continues to be principally determined by the termination of trade remedy actions or the
end of temporary tariff increases. As a result, the cumulative share of world trade affected by new
trade restrictions since the start of the financial crisis continues to rise, to over 2% today. This is far
too high, and should be addressed urgently.

Risks and uncertainties for the world economy are increasing

The global economy has entered a dangerous, uncertain phase after the encouraging signals of
recovery seen at the end of 2010 and the beginning of 2011. Downside risks and uncertainties for the
global economy are now growing: global activity is slowing down, economic performance continues
to be uneven across countries, high debt levels and financial volatility are rising, high unemployment
levels persist in many countries, and confidence has fallen sharply recently. These risks are
aggravated by perceptions in markets that governments' responses to these challenges have been
inadequate so far.

World trade growth is slowing

World trade has grown more slowly than expected in recent months. Developed economies have been
hit by a number of problems ranging from the impact of natural disasters to issues related to national
budgets, credit conditions, and sovereign debt crisis. In light of the deteriorating economic situation,
the forecast for world export growth in 2011 was revised to 5.8%, down from the earlier estimate of
6.5%. Developed economies' exports are expected to rise by 3.7% and those from developing
countries by 8.5%.

The multilateral trading system continues to be an insurance policy against protectionism

During the 2008-09 global crisis, G-20 economies were for the most part able to resist protectionist
pressures, but their collective commitment is being tested by weaker economic growth, high
unemployment and fiscal austerity. The multilateral trading system has been instrumental in




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maintaining trade openness during the crisis. Members need to preserve and strengthen this system so
that it keeps performing this vital function in the future.

The best way to further open trade in a global, predictable and transparent manner remains the
multilateral route. It is the multilateral trading system that has helped countries navigate the crisis so
far and resist protectionism.

In a context of great economic uncertainty and rising global risks, it is all the more important that the
process of global trade opening continues. For this to happen, G-20 Leaders, as well as other
participants to the trade negotiations, need to show leadership, pragmatism, and determination to find
a way out of the current impasse in the Doha Round. The forthcoming 8th Ministerial Conference
provides a possibility to find a path forward.

I. INTRODUCTION


1. This sixth Report reviews trade and trade-related measures undertaken by G-20 economies in
the period from 1 May 2011 to mid-October 2011. Monitoring Reports covering previous periods
were issued on 24 May 2011, 4 November 2010, 14 June 2010, 8 March 2010, and
14 September 2009.2


2. Section II of the Report presents a comprehensive description of all trade and trade-related
developments during the reviewed period. Government support measures implemented during this
period are covered in section III, and developments in Trade Finance in section IV. The final section
of the Report provides the context of recent economic and trade trends.


3. The country-specific measures listed in Annexes 1 (trade and trade-related measures) and 2
(government support measures) are new measures taken by G-20 economies during the period
covered. Measures and programmes implemented before May 2011 are not listed in the Annexes. A
summary table, listing all relevant measures taken since the beginning of the trade monitoring
exercise in October 2008 and indicating the status of the listed measures, is provided separately and
can be downloaded from the WTO's Website.


4. Information about the measures included in this Report has been collected from inputs
submitted by G-20 members and from other official and public sources. All information collected
was sent for verification to the G-20 member concerned; 18 G-20 delegations replied to the
verification request. Where it has not been possible to verify a measure formally, that fact is noted in
the Annexes.


II. TRADE AND TRADE-RELATED POLICY DEVELOPMENTS


A. OVERVIEW


5. At their last Summit meeting in Seoul, G-20 Leaders reaffirmed their "unwavering"
commitment to resist all forms of protectionist measures. Furthermore, recognizing the importance of
free trade and investment for global recovery, they committed to keep markets open and liberalize
trade and investment as a means to promote economic progress for all and narrow the development
gap.


2 These reports have been prepared in response to the request by the G-20 to the WTO, together with
other international bodies, to monitor and report publicly on G-20 adherence to their undertakings on resisting
protectionism and promoting global trade and investment. G-20 Leaders meeting in Seoul on 11-12 November
2010 reaffirmed the extension of their standstill commitment to resist protectionism until the end of 2013 (as
agreed at their Toronto Summit), and committed to "roll back any new protectionist measure that may have
risen, including export restrictions and WTO-inconsistent measures to stimulate exports", and asked the WTO,
OECD, and UNCTAD to continue monitoring the situation and to report publicly on a semi-annual basis.




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6. Seen from the perspective of this commitment, it is clear that there have been many instances
where the pledges were not followed. Moreover, there are concerns that the political climate in some
regions is turning towards a retreat into protectionism, and that a tendency towards industrial support,
combined with trade-restrictive measures, is emerging in some countries. Calls have been made by
some political leaders to give preference to domestic products over imported ones, or "not to import
what can be produced at home". Although these political statements were not always followed by
specific trade measures, they nevertheless inject uncertainty into world markets.


7. Over the reviewed period, most G-20 governments have put in place new measures that
restrict or distort trade, or that have the potential to restrict or distort trade. An upward trend in trade
restrictions was recorded at the time of the previous monitoring report in May 2011. This trend has
continued over the last six months and is adding to the stock of trade restrictive measures already in
place.


8. The number of potentially restrictive measures (including both import and export measures)
taken by G-20 economies has not decelerated significantly over the past six months compared with
the previous periods. Table 1 shows the evolution of these numbers based on the information
contained in Annex 1 of this Report and in previous G-20 monitoring reports.


Table 1
Trade restrictive measures by G-20 economies


First Report
(Apr - Aug 09)


Second Report
(Sep 09 - Feb 10)


Third Report
(Mar - mid-


May10)


Fourth Report
(mid-May -
mid-Oct 10)


Fifth Report (mid-
Oct -


Apr 11)


Sixth Report
(May -


mid-Oct 11) Type of measure


5 months 6 months 3 months 5 months 6 months 6 months


Trade remedy 50 52 24 33 53 44


Border 21 29 22 14 52 36


Export 9 7 5 4 11 19


Other 0 7 5 3 6 9


Total 80 95 56 54 122 108



Note: Measures included in this table are those that restrict or have the potential to restrict and/or distort trade. The measures counted


in the table are not all comparable, in particular in terms of their potential impact on trade flows. It has been estimated that G-20
economies put in place 148 trade restrictive measures during the period October 2008 to March 2009. Table 1 does not include
government support measures listed in Annex 2.


9. The pace of initiation of new trade remedies investigations has slowed down somewhat over
the past six months. Fewer border measures, in the form of tariff increases and non-automatic import
licensing requirements, were recorded during this period.


10. However, the clear upward trend in the imposition of new export restrictions observed during
mid-October 2010 to April 2011 has continued over the past six months: 19 new measures that have
the effect of restricting or controlling exports were implemented. These measures were mainly in the
form of taxes, quotas, and bans, and affected certain minerals and some food products.


11. New import restrictive measures introduced by G-20 economies from May to mid-October
2011, along with new initiations of investigations into the imposition of trade remedy measures, cover
around 0.5% of total world imports, and 0.6% of total G-20 imports (Table 2).3



3 These percentages represent the trade coverage of the measures; they do not indicate the size of their


impact on trade. The value of trade is calculated using the UNSD Comtrade database, and is counted at the six-
digit tariff line level.




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Table 2
Share of trade covered by G-20 restrictive measures
(Per cent)


October 2008 to
October 2009a


November 2009 to
May 2010a


May 2010 to mid-
October 2010b


Mid-October 2010
to April 2011b


May to mid-
October 2011c


In total world imports 0.8 0.4 0.2 0.5 0.5


In total G-20 imports 1.0 0.5 0.3 0.6 0.6


a Based on 2008 import figures.
b Based on 2009 import figures.
c Based on 2010 import figures.


Source: WTO Secretariat calculations, based on UNSD Comtrade database using import figures. Import figures for G-20 include intra-
EU27 imports.


12. The new trade restrictive measures affect a relatively wide range of products. In terms of
number of trade measures, the sectors most frequently affected during the period under review are:
machinery and mechanical appliances, articles of iron and steel, electrical machinery and equipment,
organic chemicals, plastic and plastic articles, motor vehicles, and man-made staple fibres. The
sectors most heavily affected in terms of trade coverage are motor vehicles, electrical machinery and
parts thereof, machinery and mechanical appliances, rubber and articles thereof, and paper and
paperboard (Table 3).


Table 3
G-20 restrictive measures, 1st May 2011 to mid-October 2011
(Per cent)


HS Chapters Share in total restriction


Total imports affected 100.0


Agriculture (HS 01-24) 8.2
HS 01 - Live animals 1.3
HS 02 - Meat and edible meat offal 1.6
HS 03 - Fish and crustaceans 0.3
HS 04 - Dairy produce 1.4
HS 05 - Products of animal origin, not elsewhere specified or included 0.0
HS 07 - Edible vegetables 1.0
HS 08 - Edible fruit and nuts 0.0
HS 12 - Oil seeds and oleaginous fruits 0.3
HS 15 - Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their products 0.0
HS 16 - Preparation of meat and fish 0.0
HS 17 - Sugar and sugar confectionary 0.0
HS 20 - Preparations of fruits, vegetables and nuts 0.0
HS 22 - Beverages, spirits 1.7
HS 23 - Residues and waste of food industry 0.1
HS 24 - Tobacco and manufactured products 0.3


Industry products (HS 25-97) 91.8
HS 25 - Salt, sulphur, plastering materials, lime and cement 0.2
HS 28 - Inorganic chemicals 0.0
HS 29 - Organic chemicals 1.7
HS 31 - Fertilizers 0.0
HS 32 - Tanning or dyeing extracts 0.7
HS 37 - Photographic or cinematographic goods 0.1
HS 39 - Plastic and articles thereof 0.5
HS 40 - Rubber and articles thereof 3.7
HS 42 - Articles of leather 1.1
HS 43 - Furskins and artificial fur 0.0
HS 44 - Wood and articles of wood 0.2


Table 3 (cont'd)




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HS Chapters Share in total restriction


HS 47 - Pulp of wood or of other fibrous cellulosic material 0.0
HS 48 - Paper and paperboard 2.7
HS 49 - Printed books, newspapers and other products of the printing
industry 0.3
HS 52 - Cotton 0.0
HS 54 - Man-made filaments 0.0
HS 55 - Man-made staple fibres 0.4
HS 60 - Knitted or crocheted fabrics 0.0
HS 61 - Clothing, knitted or crocheted 0.7
HS 62 - Clothing, not knitted or crocheted 0.9
HS 63 - Other made up textiles articles 0.0
HS 64 - Footwear 0.0
HS 68 - Articles of stones 0.1
HS 69 - Ceramic products 0.3
HS 70 - Glass and glassware 0.2
HS 72 - Iron and steel 1.1
HS 73 - Articles of iron and steel 2.1
HS 74 - Copper and articles thereof 0.1
HS 76 - Aluminium and articles thereof 1.6
HS 81 - Other base metals and articles thereof 0.0
HS 82 - Tools of base metals 0.1
HS 84 - Machinery and mechanical appliances 4.6
HS 85 - Electrical machinery and parts thereof 13.2
HS 87 - Vehicles 54.6
HS 89 - Ships, boats and floating structures 0.1
HS 90 - Optical and other precision instruments 0.1
HS 95 - Toys, sports requisites 0.2
HS 96 - Miscellaneous manufactured articles 0.0
HS 97 - Works of art, collectors' pieces and antiques 0.0


Note: Calculations are based on 2010 import figures. Estimates of trade coverage were made for measures for which HS codes were
provided or were easy to identify.


Source: WTO Secretariat estimates, based on UNSD Comtrade database.


13. Among the non-verified measures, the most frequent actions relate to export restrictions
(registration requirements, tariffs, and bans), non-automatic import licensing requirements, and
government procurement measures, as well as some cases of tariff reductions.


14. Concerns remain about the impact of administrative practices that, according to some
countries, significantly restrict trade opportunities. For example, concerns continue to be raised about
the length of time taken by some countries to grant non-automatic import licences (in some cases the
procedure is reported to take up to 210 days, for example on shoes); however, it was not possible for
the Secretariat to verify these assertions because the actions were based on administrative decisions
and not on written regulations.


15. During the reviewed period, there were also instances where governments put in place
measures to further facilitate trade, in particular through the temporary reduction of import tariffs
(some on a temporary basis) or the streamlining of trade procedures. Out of a total of 215 trade and
trade-related measures recorded in Annex 1, around 50% can be considered as measures facilitating
trade. This compares with 45% during the period mid-October 2010 to April 2011, and 48%
recorded in the fourth G-20 report.


16. In the area of trade in services, G-20 economies are maintaining the general thrust of their
services trade policies and levels of market openness. Save for a few instances in which the original
restrictive effect of policies has been attenuated and work-permit requirements for certain categories




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of workers been removed by a few countries, restrictive measures introduced in the last couple of
years are still in place.


17. A Summary Table (made available separately online) provides information on the status of all
the measures taken since October 2008, and indicates their current status. Out of a total of
674 measures that can be considered as restricting, or potentially restricting, trade implemented by G-
20 economies since October 2008, 19% have been eliminated. At the time of the last monitoring
report in May 2011, around 18% of the 550 restrictive measures had been removed. The removal rate
continues to be principally determined by the termination of trade remedy actions or the (automatic)
end of temporary tariff increases.


18. A new feature observed during this period is a trend to address what is perceived as currency
undervaluation through trade measures. Exchange rate developments have given rise, in some cases,
to currency intervention and fed into requests by industries to more tailored assistance and protection
from foreign competition.


B. EXPORT RESTRICTIONS


19. A significant issue in the previous trade monitoring report was the emergence of an increasing
trend in export restrictions, imposed mainly on food products and some minerals. Measures included
export taxes in response to rising prices for agricultural products and export quotas on certain metals
and minerals with a view to securing domestic supply and to addressing resource depletion.


20. This upward trend has been confirmed during the past six months. More restrictive measures
were recorded than in past periods.


21. From May 2011 to mid-October 2011 19 new measures aimed at directly or indirectly
restricting exports have been implemented, compared with 11 measures in the preceding six-month
period. Restrictive measures were taken mainly on certain raw materials and minerals. Slightly more
than 25% of the reported restrictive measures affect food products.


C. SANITARY AND PHYTOSANITARY MEASURES


22. The G-20 members are very active when it comes to measures taken for food safety, and
animal and plant health protection. All WTO Members are obliged to provide an advance notice of
intention to introduce new or modified SPS measures, or to notify immediately when emergency
measures are imposed; the G-20 members remain among the WTO Members with the highest
numbers of notified measures. In previous years, G-20 members' notifications have accounted for a
considerable share of all SPS notifications: 55% from April to mid-October 2008, 48% from April to
mid-October 2009, and 66% from April to mid-October 2010. This share continued to rise, and for
the period from April to mid-October 2011, G-20 members' notifications represented 68% of all SPS
measures notified by WTO Members.


23. The number of SPS measures notified by G-20 Members from April to mid-October 2011 is
slightly above the corresponding period of the previous year, and significantly higher than for the
same period in 2008 and 2009 (Chart 1).4 Above this general rising trend in notifications, a recent
marked increase in emergency notifications can also be observed: G-20 Members submitted 19
emergency notifications from April to mid-October 2011, compared with eight emergency
notifications during the corresponding period in 2010. These 19 notifications account for just 32% of
the total number of emergency measures notified by all WTO Members from April to mid-October
2011. It may be that the G-20 members, as other developed Members of the WTO, have a more
extensive SPS regulatory system in place that addresses many emergency situations without the need
to introduce or change regulations, and hence without the need to notify the WTO.


4 SPS notifications are covered from 1 April - mid-October 2011 so as to ensure continuity of data since the last
reporting period and to adequately reflect general trends identified on the basis of SPS notifications.




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24. It is encouraging that many of the G-20 Members are following the recommendation to notify
SPS measures even when these are based on a relevant international standard, as this substantially
increases transparency regarding SPS requirements. Of the 389 regular notifications made by G-20
Members from April to mid-October 2011, 48% indicated that an international standard, guideline or
recommendation was applicable to the notified measure (117 Codex standards, 19 OIE standards,
49 IPPC standards). Of these 185 notifications, 123 (66%) indicated that the measure being notified
was in conformity with existing standards.


277 179 381 389


13


9


8
19


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


350


400


450


04/2008 - 10/2008 04/2009 - 10/2009 04/2010 - 10/2010 04/2011 - 10/2011


Chart 1
SPS notifications by G20 economies


Number of notifications


Source: WTO Secretariat estimates.


Regular Emergency




25. International standards often provide useful guidance regarding measures to address disease
outbreaks and other emergency situations. Indeed, 18 of the 19 emergency notifications made by G-
20 Members from April to mid-October 2011 indicated that an international standard, guideline or
recommendation was applicable to the notified measure (nine Codex standards, three OIE standards,
six IPPC standards). Thirteen of the 18 emergency notifications that indicated the existence of an
international standard - flagged that the notified measure was in conformity with such standard.


26. Members are asked to identify the purpose of the measure being notified, although many
measures have more than one objective. Most of the emergency measures notified by G-20 Members
during the period of April to mid-October 2011 concerned measures to protect human health: 11
notifications were related to food safety, 11 to the protection of humans from animal diseases or plant
pests, three were related to animal health, and seven to plant protection. This means that several of
the 19 emergency notifications during this period identified more than one objective for the measure.


27. The Fukushima nuclear power plant crisis of 11 March 2011 triggered most of the
emergency-related notifications for human health protection for the above-mentioned period,
reflecting the concerns of G-20 Members with the dangers of irradiated foods. An important element
to these notifications was that they concerned temporary bans that in most cases were limited to
products only from contaminated areas in Japan (generally from five prefectures).


28. Measures maintained by G-20 Members are often discussed in the SPS Committee: the top
ten Members in terms of complaints about measures they maintain are all G-20 Members, and specific




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trade concerns (STCs) raised on the basis of measures maintained by G-20 Members (231 in total)
account for 70% of all STCs raised to date (330 in total). For example, in the June 2011 meeting of
the SPS Committee, four of the five new STCs raised were in relation to G-20 Members' measures,
whereas eight of the eleven previously raised concerns related to G-20 Members' measures. The
proposed agenda for the SPS Committee meeting of 19-20 October 2011 includes eight new STCs, of
which four regard measures maintained by G-20 Members. In this proposed agenda, 12 of the 17
previously raised issues concern measures maintained by G-20 Members.


29. The distribution of STCs raised or discussed in relation to measures maintained by G-20
Members from September 2006 to mid-October 2011 is provided in Chart 2.5 Of the 115 specific
trade concerns raised or discussed in the SPS Committee from September 2006 to mid-October 2011,
83 concerned measures maintained by G20 Members.6


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Chart 2
Specific trade concerns about G-20 SPS measures, September 2006 to mid-October 2011


Number of STC


Source: WTO Secretariat.

30. Chart 3 details the subject-matter of the STCs raised on the basis of measures maintained by
G-20 Members to date, by reference to all the STCs raised to date in the SPS Committee. It shows
that food safety is slightly more prominent in STCs brought against G-20 Members: 34% of STCs
brought against G-20 Members were on the subject of food safety, whereas the corresponding figure
in all STCs is 32%. The proportion of animal health related concerns raised on the basis of measures
maintained by G-20 Members (34%), is less than that in all STCs (38%).



5 STCs are covered from 1 September 2006 to mid-October 2011 so as to ensure continuity of data since the last


reporting period. The term 'raised or discussed' indicates that a measure raised, for instance, in the October 2010 meeting
and subsequently discussed at the March 2011 meeting, would be counted only once.


6 The figure includes the eight new STCs included in the proposed agenda for the SPS Committee meeting of
19-20 October.




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34%
32%


34%


38%
25%


24%


7%


6%


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


350


STCs raised regarding measures maintained by G20 Members - 231 Total STCs - 330


Chart 3
Specific trade concerns by SPS subject matter


Source: WTO Secretariat estimates.


Food safety Animal health Plant health Other concerns


Note: Figures include the new STCs in the proposed agenda for the SPS Committee meeting of 19-20 October.




31. Food safety was clearly more present in the STCs raised against G-20 Members at the
June 2011 meeting when all four new STCs raised were principally on food safety. In contrast, during
the previous years, the STCs raised against G20 Members have covered different subject areas (for
example, of the six new "G20 STCs" raised at the June 2010 meeting, two were principally on food
safety, two on animal health, and two on other concerns).


D. TECHNICAL BARRIERS TO TRADE (TBT)


32. Notifications of technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures to the TBT
Committee fell slightly during May 2011 to October 2011: 434 notifications were submitted,
compared with 471 notifications in the previous five-month period.7 The share of notifications by G-
20 economies in total notifications dropped compared with the previous five-month period; G-20
notifications made up 37% of the total in the previous five-month period.


33. The number of specific trade concerns8 raised and discussed in the TBT Committee has
grown considerably since the first concern was raised in 1995. In total, Members have raised
317 STCs in the Committee, with the bulk of new STCs raised in the last five years. During the
period 1995 through 1999, the average number of new STCs raised was eight; during 2000 through
2006, the average number was 16; and during 2007 through 2010 the average number rose to 34. The
trend is expected to continue in 2011, with 31 STCs raised from January through September alone.
The possible reasons behind this increase are multiple. To a certain extent, it may reflect an increase
in participation of Members in the work of the TBT Committee and associated awareness of the
importance of implementing the provisions of the TBT Agreement. It could also indicate that
Members are increasingly taking regulatory measures affecting trade in goods as a means of meeting
policy objectives. In the Committee's review of these measures, the most frequent reason for raising a


7Under the TBT Agreement, WTO Members are required to make a notification if a proposed regulation may have
a significant effect on trade of other Members and if it is not based on an international standard. Since the Agreement
entered into force, about 14,100 notifications of new or changed regulations have been submitted by 113 WTO Members.


8 Specific trade concerns relate to draft technical regulations or conformity assessment procedures that are raised
for discussion in the TBT Committee most frequently because of concerns about the potential or actual trade effects.




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measure is the need for more information or clarification about the measure at issue. Thus, the
Committee serves as an important monitoring mechanism in that it provides an opportunity for
multilateral review, enhancing both the transparency and predictability of regulations.


34. Measures maintained by G-20 economies are frequently discussed in the TBT Committee.
Approximately 94% of the specific trade concerns raised to date (1995 to October 2011) have related
to draft measures of, or measures maintained by, G-20 Members. During 2011, all but three new
STCs raised concerned measures maintained by G20 Members. The scope of the TBT Agreement is
broad (the Agreement applies to all products – industrial as well as agricultural), and measures
affecting trade in a wide variety of products have been challenged. Among the most frequent
products at issue are: food products, alcoholic beverages, hazardous substances, and chemicals.
Recently, a number of draft measures relating to tobacco have been discussed.


35. One particular tobacco-related measure was discussed at length during the June 2011 meeting
of the Committee. Fourteen Members raised trade-related concerns over Australia's new draft bill
regulating the appearance and features of tobacco packaging. According to the draft legislation, all
tobacco products sold in Australia would have olive-coloured plain packaging as of 1 July 2012. No
logos or brand images would be permitted on the packaging. The product brand name would appear in
uniform font on the front, top, and bottom of the package, and graphic health warnings would be
displayed.


36. While Australia’s public health objectives were not challenged, some Members argued that
such regulations could create an unnecessary barrier to trade, since they viewed the measure as more
trade restrictive than necessary to achieve Australia’s public health objective. Some members argued
that Australia had not provided sufficient scientific evidence linking tobacco plain packaging to a
reduction in tobacco consumption; they questioned the efficacy of the measure to achieve the stated
objective. Australia claimed that plain packaging was effective in curbing tobacco consumption, as it
would eliminate one of the last remaining forms of tobacco advertising: packaging. This measure
had been notified to the WTO on 8 April 2011.


37. Also at the June meeting, Members raised concerns about the negative trade impact of
France’s Grenelle 2 Law, which includes provisions on product carbon footprint labelling and
environmental lifecycle analysis. The law was to put into place a one-year trial programme of carbon
footprint labelling as of 1 July 2011. Concerns focused, in particular, on the inclusion of
transportation emissions in the product carbon footprint, and the fact that carbon footprint labelling
could eventually be made mandatory in France. Members argued that this law could disadvantage
imported goods in the French market.


38. Under the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding, the panel on United States - Measures
Affecting the Production and Sale of Clove Cigarettes (complaint by Indonesia) has concluded, with
the report of the Panel circulated on 2 September 2011. A second panel report, on United States -
Measures Concerning the Importation, Marketing and Sale of Tuna and Tuna products (complaint by
Mexico), was circulated on 15 September 2011. Two additional disputes dealing with TBT matters
are currently under consideration. Following a request from Norway, a panel was established on
21 April 2011 to examine the EU-wide import ban on seal products. Another panel was established
on 19 November 2009 following complaints by Canada and Mexico over certain U.S. country of
origin labelling requirements.


E. TRADE REMEDIES


39. Contrary to what was widely anticipated, the global financial crisis that began in 2008 has not
so far led to an increase in the use of trade remedies. On the contrary, the statistics show a
considerable global slowdown in trade remedies activity since 2008. The figures with respect to G-20
members parallel this global trend. The most recent data available show that initiations of trade
remedy investigations by G-20 members have declined in 2011 compared with 2010, except with




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respect to countervailing duty investigations. The analysis provided below with respect to initiations
is based on a comparison of January-September 2011 with the same period in 2010. 9


Anti-dumping


40. The previous WTO monitoring report for G-20 members reported that anti-dumping
investigations initiated by these countries had dropped slightly from October 2009-April 2010 to
October 2010-April 2011.10 The data in Table 4 show that this declining trend is continuing more or
less at the same slow pace. During January-September 2011, G-20 members initiated 90 anti-
dumping investigations, compared with 95 initiations during the same period in 2010, a decline of
5%. This decline seems to result mainly from decreased activity by India and Brazil. Australia and
the United States increased their activity significantly, followed, to a lesser extent, by South Africa,
Mexico, and Indonesia.


Table 4
Initiations of anti-dumping investigations


G-20 Members January - September 2010 January - September 2011


Argentina 7 7


Australia 7 16


Brazil 18 13


Canada 2 1


China 4 2


EU 13 11


India 32 14


Indonesia 3 6


Korea Rep.of 3 0


Mexico 2 5


Russian Federationa 0 1


South Africa 0 3


Turkey 2 1


United States 2 10


TOTAL 95 90


a Non-WTO Member. Data for the Russian Federation collected from unofficial sources.


Source: WTO Secretariat calculations.


41. In terms of products affected by anti-dumping initiations, the general outlook did not change
significantly during January to September 2011 compared with the same period in 2010. In both
periods, metals were by far the most affected products, followed by chemicals and plastics.


Countervailing Measures


42. The two previous monitoring reports for the G-20 members reported a decrease in the number
of initiations of countervailing duty investigations. Table 5 shows that the trend has reversed in 2011,
although the number of initiations remains low in absolute terms. G-20 members initiated 15 new
countervailing duty investigations between January and September 2011, compared with eight



9 Data for January-September 2011 collected from various unofficial sources.


10 The initiation of an investigation provides a more timely indication of potential trend changes in
trade remedy action than the final imposition of anti-dumping or countervailing duties, since investigations can
take 12 months or more to complete. It should be noted that the initiation of an investigation does not
necessarily result in the imposition of a final measure, but the frequency of initiations can be used as a proxy for
the degree of pressure exerted on governments to raise trade barriers at a particular time.




- 13 -

initiations in the same period in 2010. It is worth noting that no G-20 member, except China,
decreased its countervail initiations between these two periods. Brazil and Mexico, which had no
initiations in January-September 2010 each initiated three countervailing duty investigations in
January-September 2011. Initiations by the United States rose from two to four in the same period.


Table 5
Initiations of countervailing duty investigations


G-20 Members January - September 2010 January - September 2011


Australia 1 1


Brazil 0 3


Canada 1 1


China 1 0


EU 3 3


Mexico 0 3


United States 2 4


TOTAL 8 15


Source: WTO Secretariat calculations.


43. In terms of product coverage of countervail initiations, metals were in the lead during both
periods. However, some of the new initiations in January-September 2011 targeted other industries,
such as chemicals (3), textiles (3), plastics (2), and machinery (2).


Safeguards


44. Safeguard activity by G-20 members declined during the reviewed period. The last
monitoring report for the G-20 members showed that initiations of safeguard investigations by G-20
members remained stable between October 2009–April 2010 and October 2010–April 2011. The
number of initiations of new safeguard investigations over the first eight months of 2011 decreased
compared with the same period in 2010 (Table 6).


Table 6
Initiations of safeguard investigations


G20 Member January - September 2010 January - September 2011


EU 1 0
India 0 1
Indonesia 7 3
Mexico 1 0
Turkey 0 1
TOTAL 9 5


Source: WTO Secretariat calculations.


F. POLICY DEVELOPMENTS IN TRADE IN SERVICES


45. In the area of trade in services, G-20 economies are maintaining the general thrust of their
services trade policies and levels of market openness. In the period under consideration, a few G-20
countries have reduced – without eliminating – the restrictive effect of specific sectoral service
policies, and removed work permit requirements for certain categories of workers. But for most G-20
Member countries, the restrictive measures introduced in the last couple of years are still in place.


46. On 20 May 2011, the Argentine Insurance regulator (Superintendencia de Seguros) enacted
Resolution 35,794 clarifying the scope of the new reinsurance regulatory scheme in Argentina set
forth in Resolution 35,615 of 21 February 2011, which was discussed in the previous report.




- 14 -

Resolution 35,615 limited reinsurance operations in Argentina to foreign reinsurers who, by 1
September 2011, were willing to establish a local branch in Argentina, unless, due to the nature of the
risk and the lack of local capacity, the Superintendencia granted a discretionary pre-approval
exception. Resolution 35,794 sets forth limits on offshore reinsurance operations, regulates
retrocession and reinsurance operations between companies belonging to the same financial group,
and lays down capital requirements for reinsurers setting up a branch in Argentina. Under Resolution
35,794, local reinsurers are allowed to retain 10% of their eligible equity and must retain at least 15%
of the reinsurance premium ceded to them. The first US$50 million of any individual risk must be
reinsured by locally based reinsurers. The portion of the risk exceeding US$50 million may be offered
to local or foreign reinsurers registered as such with the Superintendencia. The Resolution also makes
clear that retrocession to a local or a foreign insurer is allowed, provided that foreign retrocessionaires
meet the registration requirements. The new regulatory framework also limits intra-group risk
transfers from ceding companies holding a local licence to group companies based abroad at 40% of
the annual premium. This limit may be exceeded exceptionally if the Superintendencia grants an
authorization to a ceding company that shows that coverage cannot be obtained through local insurers.


47. The Indonesian authorities introduced implementing regulations to the Law on Shipping
(17/2008, of 8 April 2009) that limit the right to cabotage to Indonesian vessels only. As of May 2011
only Indonesian vessels have the right to transport passengers and cargo within the country. However,
a recently enacted regulation (Government Regulation 22 of 2011) postponed the entry into force of
the restrictions on foreign-flagged shipping in the area of oil and gas. The new regulation provides
that foreign-flagged ships may be used in offshore drilling until end-December 2015, in oil and gas
survey until end-December 2014, and in dredging, salvage and offshore construction until end-
December 2012. The new regulation also stipulates that a permit allowing a particular foreign vessel
to operate will be issued only where there has first been an (unsuccessful) attempt to charter an
Indonesian vessel.


48. A few countries have recently removed work permit requirements for certain categories of
workers. Starting in January 2012, the Russian Federation will no longer require that nationals of
Belarus and Kazakhstan obtain work permits to take up employment in the country. As part of
Mexico's comprehensive immigration reform law, published on 25 May 2011, foreign nationals will
be allowed to perform activities in the country for up to 180 days without prior employment
authorization. In some cases, these reforms have been accompanied by the introduction of more
stringent reporting and compliance requirements for foreign nationals, with Romania a case in point.
More rigorous information requirements have been instituted also by India during the reporting
period.


49. The deadline for European Union Member States to transpose the 2009 "Blue Card" Council
Directive into national legislation was 19 June 2011. The Blue Card will allow qualifying, highly-
skilled non-EU nationals to reside and work in any EU Member State, except for the
United Kingdom, Ireland, and Denmark. EU Blue Card holders are to receive residence and work
authorisation for one to four years in the issuing Member State and will be permitted to move to a
different EU Member State after residing legally in the first State for 18 months and meeting other
conditions. The application for the Card will be accepted or rejected within 90 days of filing. An
application may be rejected, inter alia, if a Member State, given the state of its labour market, decides
to give priority to EU citizens or long-term residents.


III. GOVERNMENT SUPPORT MEASURES


50. No major upsurge in the number of new government support measures was observed during
the period under review. It would appear that the scope for additional fiscal and monetary stimulus is
constrained in many countries by debt problems and inflation risks. Nevertheless, some countries
continue to provide financial support and assistance under existing programmes. In a few cases, funds
are made available to specific sectors that are considered strategic, or to domestic industries through
measures aimed at increasing their export performance.




- 15 -




51. Specific government support measures implemented by G-20 economies since May 2011 are
shown in Annex 2. The introduction of new economic stimulus programmes declined as compared
with the previous six months.11 For this period, 28 government support measures were reported,
down from 40 for the period mid-October 2010 to April 2011.


52. Over the monitoring period, government support measures were reported in the following
areas: provision of export credit and export guarantees; loans and guarantees (mainly for SMEs);
temporary direct grants to certain companies in specific sectors (i.e. transport, manufacturing,
pharmaceutical); and specific support to farmers.


IV. DEVELOPMENTS IN TRADE FINANCE


53. Since the peak of the 2008-09 global financial crisis, trade finance has recovered, albeit, at
varying speeds. At their last Summit in Seoul, G-20 Leaders were sensitive to the fact that traders at
the "periphery" of main trade routes, particularly low-income countries, remained subject to
difficulties in accessing trade finance at affordable cost. Under paragraph 44 of the Seoul Summit
Declaration, they agreed to support measures aimed at helping low-income countries' access to trade
finance, based on an assessment of the need and of the effectiveness of existing support mechanisms.
They asked the Financial Stability Board to examine and evaluate the possible "unintended
consequences" on the availability of trade finance in poor countries of the Basel III package of
financial re-regulation.


Enhancing trade finance programmes


54. Regarding the first task, the WTO and its partners from the WTO Expert Group on Trade
Finance, mostly multilateral development banks operating trade finance programmes, have circulated
their assessment to G-20 preparatory bodies (the Development Working Group and the "Sherpas").
The report concludes that despite the efforts deployed by public-backed institutions during the recent
financial crisis, the demand by developing countries for risk mitigation in the trade finance area
outweighs the supply by far. International banks have clearly been withdrawing from financing trade
of low-income countries - apart from large commodity contracts - and emerging countries' banks have
not yet filled that gap because of lack of information on their counterparties in these countries.
Hence, in poor countries, prices for trade loans are high and confirmation of letters of credit difficult,
with no relationship to the risk of default of payments.


55. In this context, the risk mitigation capacity of the World Bank and other Multilateral
Development Banks is considered to be insufficient to meet an increasing demand. Due to resource
constraints, these institutions are facing trade-offs: supporting SME financing in systemically
important low to middle income countries (Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nigeria, Sri Lanka, Kenya) or
extending operations in smaller but equally poor countries. They are not in a position to do both. At
present, only one third of IDA-eligible countries are benefiting from the support of these facilities in a
meaningful way. Based on this diagnosis, the WTO report to the G-20 concludes that there is a
structural need to continue to support the accessibility of IDA-eligible countries under the existing
programmes, which provide very effective risk mitigation. Specific recommendations are made, some
of which are already being positively considered.


56. The report recommends in particular that Members of the G-20 ask the MDBs and the World
Bank Group to expand, as a matter of priority, the risk limits of their trade finance facilitation
programmes to allow for greater support to countries where local financial institutions cannot support
trade and traders. Two regions are of a priority: Africa and Asia.


11 This may be a reflection of the fact that not all G-20 delegations provided information on relevant
measures. Information on government support measures is not always available online, and it is more difficult
to monitor this sort of actions using other non-official sources.




- 16 -

57. In the spring of 2011, positive steps were taken in the direction of implementing some of the
report's main recommendations. For example, the Board of Directors of the International Finance
Corporation (IFC) of the World Bank Group decided to double the limit of intervention of its trade
finance facilitation programme from US$3 billion to $6 billion, conditional upon review of the impact
of such measure. This facility supports SME trade in poor countries primarily. In addition, the Board
of Directors of the IFC agreed to create a warehousing and supply-chain facility for SMEs in these
countries (to overcome the difficulties for SMEs to be integrated in the system of financing of global
value chains). The EBRD decided to expand the scope of its trade finance programme towards
countries from the Middle-East and Northern African region (MENA), and the Asian Development
Bank extended the sunset clause of the trade finance programme to 2013.


58. The WTO report also recommends the creation of a permanent trade finance facility at the
African Development Bank (AfDB), similar to those operated by sister organizations. The structural
risk of the financial sector is a major limitation to the expansion of Africa's trade capacity, at a time
when the demand for its commodity and non-commodity exports has been recovering. The gap
between the actual level of risk and the perception of risk remained large in the area of trade finance,
and credit insurance; hence, programmes such as those run by multilateral institutions are key in
filling that gap. Ahead of the G-20 Summit in Cannes, there seems to be growing support for the
creation of such a facility at the AfDB, which would mean that all regional development banks would
have a trade finance facility in place.


Basel III


59. In a joint letter sent to the G-20 Leaders in Seoul, the Heads of the World Bank Group and the
WTO raised the issue of the potential unintended consequences of the Basel II and III frameworks on
the availability of trade finance in low-income countries. While trade finance received preferential
regulatory treatment under the Basel I framework, in recognition of its safe, mostly short-term
character, the implementation of some provision of Basel II proved difficult for trade. The application
of risk weights and the confusion between country and counterparty risks have not been particularly
advantageous for banks willing to finance trade transactions with developing countries partners. Basel
III added to these requirements a 100% leverage ratio on off-balance-sheet letters of credit, which are
primarily used by developing countries.


60. In the overall framework of paragraph 41 of the Seoul Summit Declaration, these issues have
been discussed by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision's Policy Development Group and the
institutions concerned with trade finance, notably the WTO, the World Bank and the International
Chamber of Commerce (ICC).


61. In the context of the WTO Expert Group on Trade Finance, the Director-General of the WTO
encouraged the ICC's banking commission to collect the necessary data, and for the dialogue with
banking regulators on trade finance to be fact-based. Since 2010, the ICC has been able to collect
data on loss default for trade finance operations, with the world's main banks contributing. This "trade
finance loss register" indicates that the average default rate on international trade credit operations is
no higher than 0.2% globally, including during the recent period of financial crisis. This is lower than
most domestic lending activities.


62. Aggregate data were passed on to the Basel Committee on Bank Supervision to feed the
discussion with its partners. According to the ICC, World Bank, and WTO, the data indicate that
cross-border trade finance is a safe financial activity, including in low-income countries. While it was
fully justified to re-regulate the financial sector in view of recent difficulties, trade finance ought not
to become an unintended casualty.


63. The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision discussed which measures of the prudential
regulation affecting trade finance was most detrimental to trade and trade finance availability, with a
particular focus on the beneficial effects for low-income countries. Proposals were made by the WTO
and the World Bank to the Committee with a view to waive the obligation to capitalize short-term




- 17 -

letters of credit for one full year, when its average maturity was according to the registry between 90
and 115 days (consistent with the maturity of the vast majority of international trade transactions).
This measure was "blocking" hundreds of millions of US$ of unnecessary capital that could be used
to finance more trade transactions. During the G-20 Meeting in London, at the initiative of the
Director-General and of the President of the World Bank, the G-20 had already asked for a temporary
relief from this regulatory measure to support trade in developing countries. The temporary relief will
now be made permanent. Hence, 90 to 115-days trade letters of credit will be capitalized for that
appropriate maturity.


64. Besides, the Basel Committee agreed to review the rule under which the rating of a banking
counterparty in a trade transaction, could not be better than the sovereign. In many low-income
countries, the sovereign is either poorly rated or unrated, so this was discouraging trade, while traders
have good payment records. For this category of countries, the Basel Committee has lifted/adapted the
rule to the reality of international trade. This will certainly give a boost not only to north-south trade,
but also trade from emerging countries to low-income countries, and favour the integration of the later
into global supply chain financial arrangements.


V. RECENT ECONOMIC AND TRADE TRENDS


65. Since the last monitoring report in May 2011 the outlook for the global economy has
darkened considerably. Official statistics on GDP growth in the United States were revised
downward, revealing a steeper drop in output during the crisis of 2008-09 than was previously
understood, and a weaker recovery since then, stoking fears of a “double dip” recession. Global
financial markets have also been plunged into turmoil by the ongoing euro area sovereign debt crisis,
which has the potential to destabilize European and global financial institutions and undermine weak
economic recoveries in Europe and beyond. All of this has coincided with Chinese efforts to cool its
own economy to contain rising inflation, efforts that have had some success as output growth has
moderated in the last two quarters. In the event of a global downturn, the United States, the EU, and
China will probably not be in a position to support global growth through expansive fiscal policy, as
they did during the recession of 2008-09. As a result, there is a very real possibility (though not a
certainty) of the world economy falling back into recession.


66. Weaker than expected output growth in the first half of the year, combined with the
possibility of negative feedback between the real economy and the financial-fiscal crisis, have
prompted the IMF to lower its forecast for world output in 2011 to 4.0%, from 4.3% in the spring.
Advanced economies are now expected to grow just 1.6% in 2011 (down from 2.2%), while emerging
and developing economies should see an increase of around 6.6% (down from 6.8%). These figures
are calculated using purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates. At market exchange rates, the
IMF’s projection for world GDP growth in 2011 was reduced to 3.0%, from 3.4%, with no breakdown
provided for developed and developing economies.


67. As the global economic recovery has begun to look less certain, so too has the outlook for
trade. At the end of September the WTO revised its forecast for the volume of world trade in 2011 to
5.8% from its earlier estimate of 6.5%, released in April. The projected growth rate for exports of
developed economies was also revised downward, to 3.7% from 4.5%, while for the rest of the world,
including developing economies and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), it was reduced
to 8.5% from 9.5%. In addition to having faster trade growth in volume terms, developing economies
and the CIS have contributed more than half of the year-on-year increases in world trade in value (i.e.
dollar) terms since the crisis (Chart 4), despite having a smaller share in world trade (45%) than
developed economies (55%). The relatively strong trade performance of developing economies should
continue in the coming months, but even the most dynamic developing economies would still find
themselves strongly affected by another global recession.




- 18 -


9 7 9 10
13 14 10


-7


-18 -19
-13


12 11 7 7 10
12


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-5


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-12


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-25


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-40


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-20


-10


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2007Q1 2007Q2 2007Q3 2007Q4 2008Q1 2008Q2 2008Q3 2008Q4 2009Q1 2009Q2 2009Q3 2009Q4 2010Q1 2010Q2 2010Q3 2010Q4 2011Q1 2011Q2


Chart 4
Contributions to year-on-year growth in world merchandise exports, 2007Q1 - 2011Q2


Source:


Percentage change in US$ values


Note


Developed economies Developing economies + CIS a


World merchandise exports, year-on-year percentage change


a Includes significant re-exports.
Due to scarce data availability, Africa and Middle East regional totals are under-represented by about 5% and
10% respectively.
WTO Secretariat estimates, based on data compiled from IMF International Financial Statistics; Eurostat
Comext Database; Global Trade Atlas; and national statistics.


68. This monitoring report arrives at a critical juncture for the world economy. The reduced pace
of economic growth has left debtor countries more vulnerable to external economic shocks and to
missteps by policymakers. The OECD’s composite leading indicators for major economies have
either turned negative or are positive but trending negative, suggesting widespread weakness in
business and consumer confidence. Moreover, persistent high unemployment and fiscal austerity in
developed economies could increase protectionist sentiment, which if translated into policy could
prove disastrous for trade. On a more positive note, a new global recession would come as less of a
surprise than the last one, and therefore might not result in such a sudden retrenchment in
consumption, investment, and trade. Despite the increased risks, the most likely scenario for the
world economy remains sluggish but still positive growth in output and trade.


Merchandise trade volumes


69. The Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) produces monthly trade indices
that provide timely indications of recent trends in world trade volumes. Figures through July (the
latest month available) clearly show a flattening of trade flows for both advanced and
emerging/developing economies (Chart 5). According to the CPB, the volume of world trade
(average of exports and imports) was essentially unchanged between January and July of this year.
Trade for the first seven months of 2011 was 7% higher than in the same period in 2010, but the
figure for the whole year will almost certainly be lower due to recent negative data and also to the
trajectory of trade in the second half of last year.




- 19 -


50


100


150


200


250


2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011


Chart 5
Volume of monthly exports and imports, January 2000 - July 2011


50


100


150


200


250


2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011


OECD excluding Turkey, Mexico, Republic of Korea, and Central European countries.


CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.


(Indices, 2000 = 100)


Exports


Imports


World


a


Source:


Emerging economiesAdvanced economiesaWorld




70. Exports of advanced economies were up 5.5% for the year-to-date compared with the same
period in 2010, while exports of emerging and developing economies increased by 10.6%. On the
import side, advanced economies rose 4.2% year-on-year in the first seven months of 2011 while
imports of emerging and developing economies grew by 9.1%. These figures are higher than the




- 20 -

WTO’s figures for a number of reasons, including differences in statistical methodologies and data
coverage, but the CPB's figures are expected to converge toward WTO's forecast values by the end of
the year. Some of the slowdown in trade volumes was related to the Japanese earthquake and nuclear
accident in March, but by July Japan’s exports had mostly recovered after suffering a sharp drop.
Meanwhile, Japanese imports were hardly affected by the disaster.


71. Early trade volume estimates are volatile and subject to large revisions, so a measure of
"momentum", defined as the average of the last three months over the previous three, may give a
better indication of trade trends than monthly values. After declining every month since January and
turning negative in June, momentum for world trade (average of exports and imports) turned slightly
positive in July, although it was effectively equal to zero after rounding.


72. Trade volume indices are deflated to remove the influence of commodity prices and exchange
rates, but both have a strong effect on nominal trade values. Chart 6 shows IMF commodity price
indices for food, metals, and energy, from January 2005 to September 2011. Energy prices increased
by 23% during the first four months of this year, but then fell 11% between April and September as
the world economy slowed and expectations of future demand fell. Similarly, prices for mining and
food products fell by 13% and 8%, respectively, from their peaks through September.


0


50


100


150


200


250


300


Chart 6
Prices of selected primary commodities, January 2005 - September 2011
(Indices of current dollar values, 2005=100)


Source: International Monetary Fund.


Food


Metals


Energy




Merchandise trade values

73. Chart 7 shows merchandise exports and imports of selected G-20 economies in current
U.S. dollars, not seasonally adjusted, through August or September depending on data availability.
Exports of the largest developed economies (the United States, Japan, and European Union) and many
developing economies all appear to have levelled off in the graphs. Imports also appear to have
slowed for most of these countries, the major exception being the United States, where they continued
to rise. As a result, the U.S. merchandise trade deficit swelled to around US$80 billion in August, up
sharply from around US$60 billion at the beginning of 2011 and from US$32 billion in February 2009
at the nadir of the trade collapse.




- 21 -


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Chart 7
Monthly merchandise exports and imports of G-20 economies, January 2007 - September 2011


United States Japan


(US$ billion)


European Union (extra-trade) France


Germany United Kingdom


China


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15


20


Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 Jan-10 Jul-10 Jan-11 Jul-11


Indonesia


Source: IMF, International Financial Statistics;
GTIS GTA database; national statistics.


Exports Imports


Chart 7 (continued)


Mexico







- 23 -

74. Exports and imports in France and Germany have dipped ominously in dollar terms in recent
months. However, some of these changes may be due to normal seasonal variation, so year-on-year
growth rates should be considered. Germany’s merchandise exports increased 28% year-on-year in
August, up from 18% in July. At the same time Germany’s imports rose by 26% year-on-year in the
latest month, up from 21% in July. Similar increases in year-on-year growth rates between July and
August were recorded for France. This suggests that the actual declines in France and Germany's trade
flows may not be as severe as they appear in the charts.


75. The apparent declines in the trade values for France and Germany may also be partly
explained by recent shifts in the value of the euro against the U.S. dollar. Merchandise trade values
for France and Germany include EU intra-trade, which is sensitive to the euro/dollar exchange rate.
The euro depreciated by 11% against the dollar between 1 May and 1 October, which makes the same
intra-EU trade worth less in dollar terms, thereby reducing the value of exports and imports for France
and Germany (Chart 8).


90


95


100


105


110


115


Jan-11 Feb-11 Mar-11 Apr-11 May-11 Jun-11 Jul-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 Oct-11


Euro area Japan China United Kingdom


Chart 8
U.S. dollar exchange rates of selected economies, since January 2011
(Indices, 1 January 2011=100)


Source: The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Trade in commercial services


76. A limited amount of quarterly data is available on trade in commercial services. Existing
information provides some evidence of a slowdown in world trade, but this is not conclusive.


77. U.S. imports of commercial services in 2011Q2 returned to their pre-crisis level of around
US$100 billion, first reached in 2008, based on figures from the WTO Secretariat. Meanwhile,
exports rose to their pre-crisis peak of US$140 billion in Q2 of 2010 but have been more or less flat
since then. Year-on-year growth in U.S. commercial services trade in the second quarter of 2011 was
12% on the export side and 6% on the import side, with little change from the previous quarter for
either exports or imports.




- 24 -

78. European Union (27) extra-exports of services were valued at US$139 billion in 2011Q1.
They have never recovered their pre-crisis peak of US$203 billion recorded in 2008Q3. On the
import side, shipments in 2011Q2 were worth US$120 billion, well down from their peak of US$179
billion in 2008Q3. Extra-exports actually declined 16% year-on-year in Q2 after growing 11% in
2011Q1. Extra-imports also fell 14% year-on-year in Q2 after increasing by 6% in Q1.


79. Japanese exports of services dropped sharply in 2011Q2, wiping out all gains for the year.
The year-on-year change in exports was -1%, following a 15% increase in 2011Q1. Imports also
dipped in Q2 but not as sharply, ending with a 2% year-on-year increase following a 10% increase in
the previous quarter. The value of Japan's trade in services in Q2 was US$32.7 billion on the export
side and US$39.6 on the import side.


80. Only six quarters of data were available for China, but this was enough to observe a fairly
strong slowing of services exports (but not a decline) in the latest quarter. Year-on-year growth in
services exports from China dropped from 26% in Q1 to 9% in 2011Q2. There was also a less
dramatic decline on the import side (from 25% in Q1 to 21% in Q2). Exports and imports were
valued at US$45 billion and US$56 billion, respectively, in 2011Q1


81. Taken together, these data suggest that services exports and imports have stalled or are
declining in Europe and Japan, but are still growing (albeit more slowly than before) in the United
States and China.


Employment and output


82. Unemployment remains stubbornly high in the United States at 9.1%, more than two years
after the country’s recession officially ended in June 2009 (Chart 9). The European Union’s rate is
not much different at 9.5%, but the United States has suffered a bigger increase in joblessness since
the financial crisis. The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.5% as recently as 2007Q1, at which time the
EU’s rate was 7.5%. The fraction of the Japanese labour force that was counted as unemployed in in
Q2-2011 was 4.5%, not much different from the share at the beginning of 2007 (4%). However, the
country's tradition of lifetime employment means that there is a looser relationship between
unemployment and output than in other developed countries. There are little employment data
available for China.


83. GDP is growing too slowly in the developed world to bring down unemployment rates any
time soon. Output in the United States increased at a meagre 1.4% annualized rate in Q2 following
growth of just 0.3% in Q1. Meanwhile, the EU and Japan have fared no better. Japan's economy
contracted 2.1% in Q2, the fourth quarter out of five with negative growth. The EU recorded an
increase of just 0.9% in Q2 following growth of 2.9% in Q1.


84. Germany has been one of the bright spots during the post-crisis recovery, but its GDP growth
fell to just 0.5% in Q2, down sharply from 5.5% in Q1. Slower growth in the engine of the EU
economy will make it even more difficult for the EU to deal with its fiscal and banking crisis.




- 25 -


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


-10


-8


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


6


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


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Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


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08


Q
4


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09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


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09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


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10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Chart 9
GDP growth and unemployment rates of selected G20 economies, 2007Q1 - 2011Q3
(Annualized percentage change over previous quarter and percentage of labour force)


United States


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


-12


-10


-8


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


6


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


European Union (27)


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


-8


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


6


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


-20


-15


-10


-5


0


5


10
20


07
Q


1
20


07
Q


2
20


07
Q


3
20


07
Q


4
20


08
Q


1
20


08
Q


2
20


08
Q


3
20


08
Q


4
20


09
Q


1
20


09
Q


2
20


09
Q


3
20


09
Q


4
20


10
Q


1
20


10
Q


2
20


10
Q


3
20


10
Q


4
20


11
Q


1
20


11
Q


2
20


11
Q


3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


-14


-12


-10


-8


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


-10


-8


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


6


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


France Germany


Italy United Kingdom






- 26 -


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


-20


-15


-10


-5


0


5


10


15


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Chart 9 (continued)


Japan


0


1


2


3


4


5


-20


-15


-10


-5


0


5


10


15


20


20
07


Q
1


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3


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07


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4


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08


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1


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08


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2


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08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


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09


Q
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09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


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09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


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4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Republic of Korea


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


-20


-15


-10


-5


0


5


10


15


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


-20


-15


-10


-5


0


5


10


15


20
20


07
Q


1
20


07
Q


2
20


07
Q


3
20


07
Q


4
20


08
Q


1
20


08
Q


2
20


08
Q


3
20


08
Q


4
20


09
Q


1
20


09
Q


2
20


09
Q


3
20


09
Q


4
20


10
Q


1
20


10
Q


2
20


10
Q


3
20


10
Q


4
20


11
Q


1
20


11
Q


2
20


11
Q


3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


1


2


3


4


5


-5


0


5


10


15


20


25


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


1


2


3


4


5


0


5


10


15


20


25


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Brazil Russian Federation


China a, b India b


a GDP growth estimated based on year-on-year changes reported by China's National Bureau of Statistics through 2010Q4.
b Unemployment data not available.






- 27 -


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


6


8


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
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07


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3


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07


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4


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08


Q
1


20
08


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2


20
08


Q
3


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08


Q
4


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09


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1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


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4


20
11


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1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
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or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Chart 9 (continued)


Australia


Source: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and National Statistics.


0


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


-10


-8


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


6


8


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


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3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Canada


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


14


-25


-20


-15


-10


-5


0


5


10


15


20


25


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
r f


or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


0


5


10


15


20


25


30


-8


-6


-4


-2


0


2


4


6


8


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
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or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Indonesia Turkey


South Africa


GDP (LHS) Unemployment rate (RHS)


0


2


4


6


8


10


12


-5


0


5


10


15


20


20
07


Q
1


20
07


Q
2


20
07


Q
3


20
07


Q
4


20
08


Q
1


20
08


Q
2


20
08


Q
3


20
08


Q
4


20
09


Q
1


20
09


Q
2


20
09


Q
3


20
09


Q
4


20
10


Q
1


20
10


Q
2


20
10


Q
3


20
10


Q
4


20
11


Q
1


20
11


Q
2


20
11


Q
3


%
o


f l
ab


ou
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or
ce


%
c


ha
ng


e
ov


er
p


re
vi


ou
s


qu
ar


te
r


Argentina


All data are seasonally adjusted except for the unemployment rate of Indonesia. Unemployment rates of EU
countries are harmonized rates.


Note:







- 28 -



ANNEX 1


G-20 - Trade and trade-related measures
May 2011- mid October 20111



VERIFIED INFORMATION


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Argentina Termination on 2 May 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of electrical ignition or starting equipment
of a kind used for spark-ignition or compression-ignition internal
combustion engines (for example, ignition magnetos, magneto-
dynamos, ignition coils, sparking plugs and glow plugs, starter
motors), generators (NCM 8511.30.20; 8511.80.30; 8511.80.90;
9032.89.11) from China (initiated on 2 November 2009)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/195/ARG,
22 February 2010 and
Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina Termination on 3 May 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of certain oil country tubular goods
(NCM 7304.29.10; 7304.29.31; 7304.29.39; 7304.29.90;
7306.29.00) from China (initiated on 3 November 2009)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ARG,
3 October 2011




Argentina Termination on 20 May 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
austenitic stainless steel pipes and tubes from Brazil and Chinese
Taipei (imposed on 21 May 2003)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ARG,
3 October 2011


Argentina Termination on 6 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
flat rolled products of iron or non-alloy steel from Brazil, Russian
Federation, and Ukraine (imposed on 10 December 1999)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ARG,
3 October 2011


Argentina Termination on 17 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
herbicides from Japan (imposed on 25 June 2002)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ARG,
3 October 2011


Argentina Termination on 18 July 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of air conditioning machines (NCM
8415.10.11; 8415.83.00; 8418.69.40) from Korea, Rep. of;
Malaysia; Thailand; and Viet Nam (initiated on 16 February 2010)


Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina Initiation on 27 July 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of unglazed ceramic flags and paving, hearth or wall tiles;
unglazed ceramic mosaic cubes and the like, whether or not on a
backing (NCM 6907.90.00) from China


Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina Initiation on 2 August 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of poly(vinyl chloride), not mixed with any other
substances (NCM 3904.10.10) from the United States


Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina Initiation on 2 August 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of polyethers (polieter poliol copolímero)
(NCM 3907.20.39) from the United States


Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina Termination on 10 August 2011 (without measure) of anti-
dumping investigation on imports of butcher's or kitchen knives
having fixed blades (NCM 8211.92.10) from Brazil and China
(initiated on 26 March 2009)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/195/ARG,
22 February 2010 and
Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina Temporary reduction of export tariffs "derecho de exportación" on
fish and crustaceans (NCM 0304; 0305), prepared or preserved
fish (NCM 1604), and on prepared or preserved crustaceans
(NCM 1605)


Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)


Effective
18 August 2011 to
18 February 2012


Annex 1 (cont'd)



1 The inclusion of any measure in this table implies no judgement by the WTO Secretariat on whether


or not such measure, or its intent, is protectionist in nature. Moreover, nothing in the table implies any
judgement, either direct or indirect, on the consistency of any measure referred to with the provisions of any
WTO agreement or such measure's impact on, or relationship with, the global financial crisis.




- 29 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Argentina Update of the list of "criterion values" (valores criterio de carácter
precautorio) for imports of a variety of products, i.e. screw, bolts,
coach screws, screw hooks, rivets, cotters, cotter-pins, washers and
similar articles of iron or steel, and nails of copper; poly(ethylene
terephthalate); parts and accessories of motor vehicles; plates,
sheets, film, foil and strip, of plastics, non-cellular and not
reinforced, laminated, supported or similarly combined with other
materials; articles of leather, saddlery and harness, travel goods,
handbags; spectacle lenses; woven fabrics of synthetic filament
yarn; conveyor or transmission belts or belting, of vulcanised
rubber; synthetic filament yarn (other than sewing thread);
synthetic staple fibres; toys, playing cards; plates, sheets, fil, foil
and strip of polyurethanes; cotton yarn; yarn of synthetic staple
fibres; spectacles, goggles and their frame and mountings;
electronic sound or visual signalling apparatus; electrical apparatus
for switching or protecting electrical circuits; woven fabrics of
cotton; transmission shafts and cranks; and paper and paperboard;
woven fabrics of synthetic staple fibres, woven fabrics of artificial
staple fibres (NCM Chapters 39; 40; 42; 48; 52; 54; 55; 73; 74; 76;
84; 85; 87; 90; 95), from specific origins (implementation of the
measure on various dates)


Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina Update of the list of "reference values" (valores referenciales de
carácter preventivo) for exports of milk and cream in powder,
concentrated or containing added sugar or other sweetening matter
(NCM 0402.21.10; 1901.90.90) for certain specified destinations


Resolución General
AFIP No. 3173
(29 August 2011)




Argentina Termination on 5 September 2011 of anti-dumping duties on
imports of polystyrene foam trays (NCM 3923.90.00) from
Uruguay (imposed on 5 September 2008)


Permanent Delegation of
Argentina to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Argentina,
Brazil,
Paraguay and
Uruguay
(Mercosur)


Creation of new tariff lines (NCM 8415.90.10; 8415.90.20) with
an import tariff of 18%, resulting in an increase of import tariffs
(from 14%) on air conditioning machines "split-system"


Resolución No. 3/11 del
Grupo Mercado Común
(17 June 2011)


Effective
1 October 2011


Argentina,
Brazil,
Paraguay and
Uruguay
(Mercosur)


Creation of a new tariff line (NCM 8431.49.22) with an import
tariff of 14%, resulting in an increase of import tariffs (from zero)
on caterpillars/crawlers (orugas)


Resolución No. 13/11
del Grupo Mercado
Común (27 June 2011)




Australia Termination on 5 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
mobile garbage bins (HS 3924.90.00) from Malaysia (imposed on
6 June 2006)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/AUS,
7 October 2011


Australia Additional consumer price index adjustment for the calculation of
new rates of customs duties for certain products such as alcoholic
beverages (HS 2203; 2204; 2205; 2206; 2207; 2208) and tobacco
products (HS 2401; 2402; 2403) resulting in increase of the
customs and excise duties


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(3 October 2011)


Effective
1 August 2011


Australia Termination on 7 September 2011 (without measure) of anti-
dumping investigation on imports of pineapple fruit prepared or
preserved in containers exceeding one litre (food service and
industrial "FSI" pineapple) (HS 2008.20.00) from Indonesia
(initiated on 15 April 2011)


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(3 October 2011)




Australia Termination on 7 September 2011 (without measure) of anti-
dumping investigation on imports of pineapple fruit prepared or
preserved in containers not exceeding one litre "consumer
pineapple" (HS 2008.20.00) from Indonesia (initiated on
15 April 2011)


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(3 October 2011)




Australia Initiation on 9 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of single and multi-core cables insulated with polymeric
materials intended for use in electric installations at working
voltages up to and including 1 kV (HS 8544.49.20) from China


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(3 October 2011)




Australia Initiation on 9 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of structural timber, being coniferous wood that is sawn or
chipped lengthwise (HS 4407.10.10; 4407.10.99) from Austria,
Canada, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Lithuania, Sweden,
and the United States


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(3 October 2011)




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 30 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Australia Initiation on 19 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of "hollow structural sections" - certain electric resistance
welded pipe and tube made of carbon steel, comprising circular
and non-circular hollow sections in galvanised and non-galvanised
finishes (HS 7306.30.00; 7306.69.00) from China; Korea, Rep. of;
Malaysia; Chinese Taipei; and Thailand


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Australia Initiation on 19 September 2011 of countervailing investigation on
imports of "hollow structural sections" - certain electric resistance
welded pipe and tube made of carbon steel, comprising circular
and non-circular hollow sections in galvanised and non-galvanised
finishes (HS 7306.30.00; 7306.69.00) from China


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Australia Termination on 10 October 2011 of anti-dumping duties on
imports of pineapple fruit prepared or preserved in containers not
exceeding one litre "consumer pineapple" (HS 2008.20.00) from
China (imposed on 11 October 2006)


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




Australia "Buy Australia at Home and Abroad" scheme which foresees
additional funding in the domestic 2011-12 budget to reinforce
local firm's competitive position in procurement bids


Permanent Delegation of
Australia to the WTO
(17 October 2011)


Announced in
May 2011


Brazil Extension of the temporary elimination of import tariffs (from
10% to zero) on cotton (NCM 5201.00.20; 5201.00.90) (quota
250,000 tonnes) (originally implemented on 14 September 2010
and effective until 31 May 2011)


Camex Resolution
No. 27 (5 May 2011)


Effective until
30 June 2011


Brazil Initiation on 16 May 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of pile fabrics, including "long pile" fabrics and terry
fabrics, knitted or crocheted (NCM 6001.10.20) from China
(possible circumvention of anti-dumping measures of imports of
synthetic fibre blankets (NCM 6301.40.00) from China (imposed
on 29 April 2010))


Secex Circular No. 20
(13 May 2011) and
WTO document
G/ADP/N/202/BRA,
6 September 2010




Brazil Initiation on 16 May 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of synthetic fibre blankets (NCM 6301.40.00) from
Paraguay and Uruguay (possible circumvention of anti-dumping
measures of imports from China imposed on 29 April 2010)


Secex Circular No. 20
(13 May 2011) and
WTO document
G/ADP/N/202/BRA,
6 September 2010




Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2%) on: 4,4'-
isopropylidenediphenol (bisphenol A, diphenylolpropane) and its
salts (NCM 2907.23.00) (quota 3,000 tonnes); and flat rolled
products of iron or non-alloy steel (of a thickness exceeding
10 mm), of a width of 600 mm or more, hot-rolled, not clad, plated
or coated (NCM 7208.51.00) (quota 30,000 tonnes)


Camex Resolution
No. 34 (17 May 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Brazil Termination on 20 May 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of heavy plates (NCM 7208.51.00;
7208.52.00) from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea,
Mexico, Chinese Taipei, and Turkey (initiated on 26 August 2010)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/209/BRA,
28 March 2011 and
Secex Circular No. 23
(19 May 2011)




Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs on certain products: (to zero)
hepatitis B vaccine for human (NCM 3002.20.23) (quota
33 million doses); and rabies vaccine for human
(NCM 3002.20.29) (quota 3 million doses); and (to 2%) palm
kernel or babassu oil and fractions (NCM 1513.29.10) (quota
222,500 tonnes)


Camex Resolution
No. 39 (31 May 2011)




Brazil Initiation on 7 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on imports
of unwrought magnesium containing at least 99.8% by weight of
magnesium (NCM 8104.11.00) from the Russian Federation


Secex Circular No. 29
(6 June 2011)




Brazil Initiation on 8 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on imports
of polymeric MDI (NCM 3909.30.20) from Belgium, China, and
the United States


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/BRA,
23 September 2011




Brazil Initiation on 13 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of cutlery made of stainless steel of the category superior
or luxury (NCM 8211.10.00; 8211.91.00; 8215.20.00; 8215.99.10)
from China


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/BRA,
23 September 2011




Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2%) on mixed
alkylbenzenes (NCM 3817.00.10) (quota 3,000 tonnes)


Camex Resolution No.
41 (14 June 2011)




Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2%) on titanium oxides
(NCM 2823.00.10) (quota 6,000 tonnes)


Camex Resolution No.
43 (21 June 2011)




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 31 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Brazil Termination on 22 July 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of stainless steel cookware (NCM
7323.93.00) from India (initiated on 22 December 2010)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/209/BRA,
28 March 2011 and
Secex Circular No. 38
(21 July 2011)




Brazil Adoption of the Convention on Temporary Admission (Istanbul
Convention of 26 June 1990)


Permanent Delegation of
Brazil to the WTO
(30 September 2011)




Brazil Introduction of "Buy Brazil" clause on government procurement
(up to 25% preference for local products and services) under a new
Decree establishing an Inter-Ministerial Commission on public
procurement


Decreto 7546/11
(2 August 2011)




Brazil Temporary elimination of import tariffs (to zero) on terephthalic
acid and its salts (NCM 2917.36.00) (quota 135,000 tonnes)


Camex Resolution
No. 58 (12 August 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Brazil Revised customs procedures on imports of textiles and clothing
(NCM Chapters 61 and 62) under the "Panos Quentes III" scheme.
Goods passing through the "grey" and "red" customs procedures
now subject to physical inspection by sampling


Permanent Delegation of
Brazil to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective
17 August 2011


Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2%) on flat-rolled
products of iron or non-alloy steel, not in coils, not further worked
than hot-rolled of a thickness exceeding 10 mm
(NCM 7208.51.00) (quota 4,000 tonnes)


Camex Resolution
No. 59 (29 August 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2%) on coated paper and
paper board (NCM 4810.13.90) (quota 2,500 tonnes) and flanges
(NCM 7307.91.00) (quota 90 tonnes)


Camex Portaria No. 30
(2 September 2011)


Effective until
29 February 2012


Brazil Revised legislations modifying the time-frame (up to 90 days) for
collecting anti-dumping and countervailing duties


Camex Resolution No.
64 (9 September 2011)
and Portaria No. 35
(11 October 2011)




Brazil Initiation on 12 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of yarn (other than sewing thread) of synthetic and
artificial staple fibres "fios compostos por pelo menos 50% de
fibras de viscose" (NCM 5509.51.00; 5510.11.00; 5510.12.00;
5510.20.00; 5510.30.00; 5510.90.00; 5511.30.00) from Turkey and
Viet Nam


Secex Circular No. 44
(9 September 2011)




Brazil Initiation on 12 September 2011 of countervailing investigation on
imports of yarn (other than sewing thread) of synthetic and
artificial staple fibres "fios de viscose" (NCM 5509.51.00;
5510.11.00; 5510.12.00; 5510.20.00; 5510.30.00; 5510.90.00;
5511.30.00) from India, Indonesia, and Thailand


Secex Circular No. 45
(9 September 2011)




Brazil Reduction of the IPI (Imposto sobre Produtos Industrializados)
internal industrial tax on certain items of the car industry (i.e. cars,
lorries, and commercial trucks) for companies fulfilling specific
requirements on: local content (at least 65%), investment
provisions (invest at least 0.5% of after-tax income in R&D in
Brazil). Manufacturers have two months to prove that they produce
65% or more of their components in Brazil, or to adjust its
production chain and assembly operations. Decree No. 7567 also
established higher IPI rates (ranging from 30% to 55%) applicable
until 31 December 2012 on vehicles (NCM 8701; 8703; 8704)


Decree No. 7.567/11
(15 September 2011)


Effective
15 September 2011
to
31 December 2012


Brazil Increase of import tariffs (from 12% to 35%) on ceramic tiles
(NCM 6907) (included in its national list of exemptions to the
Mercosur Common Tariff)


Permanent Delegation of
Brazil to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective
15 September 2011


Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2% and zero) on 3,779
capital goods and 111 integrated systems (NCM Chapters 73, 81,
84, 85, 87, 90, 94), through the "ex-out" regime (mechanism
designed to temporarily reduce import tariffs on capital goods and
informatics and telecommunication equipment not locally
produced)


Camex Resolutions Nos.
27, 28, 29, 35, 36, 47,
48, 50, 51, 56, 57, 68 and
70 (various dates)


Effective until
31 December 2012


Brazil Initiation on 4 October 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of certain parts of footwear (uppers, soles and heels)
(NCM 6406.10.00; 6406.20.00; 6409.99.00) from China,
Indonesia, and Viet Nam (possible circumvention of anti-dumping
measures imposed on 5 March 2010)


Secex Circular No. 48
(30 September 2011)




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 32 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2%) on certain products,
i.e. 6-Hexanelactam (epsilon-caprolactam) (NCM 2933.71.00)
(quota 45,000 tonnes) (effective until 5 October 2012); flat rolled
products of stainless steel, of a width of less than 600 mm (NCM
7220.90.00) (quota 70 tonnes) (effective until 5 February 2012);
and articles of iron and steel (NCM 7326.90.90) (quota 1,500
tonnes) (effective until 5 April 2012)


Camex Resolution No.
72 (5 October 2011) and
Portaria No. 36
(13 October 2011)



Brazil Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to 2%) on 16 capital goods


tariff lines (NCM 8419; 8421;8431; 8439; 8457; 8458; 8464;
8471; 8477; 8502; 9024; 9027; 9031)


Camex Resolution No.
74 (5 October 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Brazil Specific regulations on government contracts for the deployment,
maintenance and improvement of information technology and
communication systems, under which bidding may be limited to
goods and services whose technology is locally developed and are
produced in accordance with the basic production process. For
such contracts to be considered strategic a joint act by 3 Ministries
is required


Permanent Delegation of
Brazil to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Canada Elimination of one item from the import control list, i.e. other cuts
of swine frozen (HS 0203.29.00) (repealing Surtax Order (item
194))


Permanent Delegation of
Canada to the WTO
(5 October 2011)


Effective
29 July 2011


Canada Termination on 15 August 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports
of flat hot-rolled carbon and alloy steel sheet and strip
(HS 7208.25; 7208.26; 7208.27; 7208.36; 7208.37; 7208.38;
7208.39; 7208.53; 7208.54; 7208.90; 7211.13; 7211.14; 7211.19;
7211.90; 7225.30; 7225.40; 7225.99; 7226.20; 7226.91; 7226.99)
from South Africa (imposed on 17 August 2001)


Permanent Delegation of
Canada to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




Canada Initiation on 12 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of oil country tubular goods pup joints, made of carbon or
alloy steel, welded or seamless, heat-treated or not heat-treated
(HS 7304.29.00) from China


Permanent Delegation of
Canada to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




Canada Initiation on 12 September 2011 of countervailing investigation on
imports of oil country tubular goods pup joints, made of carbon or
alloy steel, welded or seamless, heat-treated or not heat-treated
(HS 7304.29.00) from China


Permanent Delegation of
Canada to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




China Termination on 12 May 2011 (expiry without review) of anti-
dumping duties on imports of nucleotide-type food additives
(HS 2934.99; 3824.90.99) from Japan and Korea, Rep. of
(imposed on 12 May 2006)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/CHN,
12 October 2011




China Termination on 22 July 2011 (expiry without review) of anti-
dumping duties on imports of polybutylene terephthalate resin
"PBT" (HS 3907.99) from Japan and Chinese Taipei (imposed on
22 July 2006)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/209/CHN,
29 April 2011 and
Permanent Delegation of
China to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




China Initiation on 8 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of certain high-performance stainless steel seamless tubes
(HS 7304.41; 7304.49; 7304.51; 7304.59) from the EU and Japan


Permanent Delegation of
China to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




China Export quotas and licensing requirement on rare earth ferroalloy
(ex HS 7202.99.91)


Permanent Delegation of
China to the WTO
(5 October 2011)


Effective
20 May 2011


Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 33 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


China Application of interim import tariffs on 33 HS tariff lines which
results in reductions (from 25% to 20%) on chestnuts
(HS 0802.40.90; 0802.90.20); (from 5% to 1%) light oils
(HS 2710.11.10); (from 9% to zero) petroleum oils
(HS 2710.19.11); (from 6% to zero) petroleum oils
(HS 2710.19.21); (from 6% to 1%) petroleum oils
(HS 2710.19.22); (from 12% to 6%) woven fabrics of cotton
(HS 5210.11.00; 5210.19.10; 5210.19.90; 5211.11.00; 5211.12.00;
5211.19.00; 5212.11.00; 5212.21.00); (from 10% to 5%) flax yarn
(HS 5306.20.00); (from 14% to 7%) tents and pneumatic
mattresses (HS 6306.29.10; 6306.29.90; 6306.40.10; 6306.40.90;
6307.10.00); (from 16% to 7%) pneumatic mattresses
(HS 6306.40.20); (from 14% to 10%) life-jackets and life-belts
(HS 6307.20.00); (from 1.5% to 1%) waste and scrap of nickel and
zinc (HS 7503.00.00; 7902.00.00); (from 3% to 1%) unwrought
zinc (HS 7901.11.10; 7901.11.90; 7901.12.00; 7901.20.00); (from
5% to 2%) radar apparatus (HS 8526.10.90); (from 20% to 15%)
spectacle lenses (HS 9001.40.10; 9001.50.10); (from 16% to 10%)
spectacles, goggles and the like (HS 9004.90.10); and (from 8% to
4%) other breathing appliances and gas masks (HS 9020.00.00)


Permanent Delegation of
China to the WTO
(5 October 2011)


Effective
1 July 2011


China Second batch of export quotas for coke (HS 2704.00.10)
(3.8 million tonnes)


Permanent Delegation of
China to the WTO
(17 October 2011)


Announced on
7 July 2011


China Second batch of export quotas for 11 rare earth minerals, i.e.
ammonium, tungsten, tin, silver, molybdenum for 2011 set at
15,378 tonnes (7,976 tonnes for same period in 2010). (WTO
Reporter (15 July 2011) said that annual volume of allowed
exports of rare earth minerals will total 30,184 tonnes (0.4% lower
than in 2010). A Decree dated 25 July 2011 is said to have reduced
production quotas (capped at 93,800 tonnes))


Permanent Delegation of
China to the WTO
(17 October 2011) and
Press reports


Announced on
14 July 2011


China Second batch of export quotas for certain non-ferrous metals,
i.e. tungsten (6,280 tonnes), antimony (24,120 tonnes), silver
(2,265 tonnes), tin (7,097 tonnes), indium (93 tonnes), and
molybdenum (10,200 tonnes)


Permanent Delegation of
China to the WTO
(17 October 2011)


Announced in
July 2011


EU Termination on 11 May 2011 (without measure) of countervailing
investigation on imports of "biodiesel" - fatty-acid mono-alkyl
esters and/or paraffinic gasoil obtained from synthesis and/or
hydro-treatment, of non-fossil origin, in pure form or in a blend
containing by weight more than 20% of fatty-acid mono-alkyl
esters and/or paraffinic gasoil obtained from synthesis and/or
hydro-treatment, of non-fossil origin (HS 1516.20.98; 1518.00.91;
1518.00.99; 2710.19.41; 3824.90.91; 3824.90.97) from Singapore
(possible circumvention of countervailing measures of imports
from the United States imposed in 2009) (initiated on
11 August 2010)


WTO document
G/SCM/N/228/EEC,
14 October 2011




EU Termination on 11 May 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of "biodiesel" - fatty-acid mono-alkyl
esters and/or paraffinic gasoil obtained from synthesis and/or
hydro-treatment, of non-fossil origin, in pure form or in a blend
containing by weight more than 20% of fatty-acid mono-alkyl
esters and/or paraffinic gasoil obtained from synthesis and/or
hydro-treatment, of non-fossil origin (HS 1516.20.98; 1518.00.91;
1518.00.99; 2710.19.41; 3824.90.91; 3824.90.97) from Singapore
(possible circumvention of anti-dumping measures of imports from
the United States imposed in 2009) (initiated on 13 August 2010)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/EEC,
14 October 2011




EU Initiation on 13 May 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of stainless steel fasteners and parts thereof (HS
7318.12.10; 7318.14.10; 7318.15.30; 7318.15.51; 7318.15.61;
7318.15.70) from India


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/EEC,
14 October 2011




EU Initiation on 13 May 2011 of countervailing investigation on
imports of stainless steel fasteners and parts thereof (HS
7318.12.10; 7318.14.10; 7318.15.30; 7318.15.51; 7318.15.61;
7318.15.70) from India


WTO document
G/SCM/N/228/EEC,
14 October 2011




EU Termination on 17 May 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
dead-burned (sintered) magnesia (HS 2519.90.30) from China
(imposed on 11 December 1993)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/EEC,
14 October 2011




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 34 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


EU Initiation on 18 May 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of molybdenum wire, containing by weight at least
99.95% of molybdenum, of which the maximum cross-sectional
dimension exceeds 1.35 mm but does not exceed 4 mm
(HS 8102.96.00) from Malaysia and Switzerland (possible
circumvention of anti-dumping measures of imports from China
imposed in 2010)


Commission Regulation
No. 477/2011
(17 May 2011)




EU Termination on 9 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
synthetic polyester staple fibres "PSF" (HS 5503.20.00) from
China (imposed on 17 March 2005)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/EEC,
14 October 2011




EU Temporary elimination of import tariffs for an additional
exceptional quantity of sugar (HS1701) (200,000 tonnes) in the
2010-11 marketing year


WTO document
WT/TPR/OV/W/5,
9 June 2011 and
Commission
Implementing
Regulation No. 589/2011
(20 June 2011)


Effective
1 July 2011 to
30 September 2011


EU Termination on 25 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
magnesia bricks (HS 6815.91.00; 6815.99.00) from China
(imposed on 12 October 2005)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/EEC,
14 October 2011




EU Initiation on 28 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of certain seamless pipes and tubes of iron or steel,
excluding seamless pipes and tubes of stainless steel, of circular
cross-section, of an external diameter not exceeding 406.4 mm
with a Carbon Equivalent Value (CEV) not exceeding 0.86
according to the International Institute of Welding (IIW) formula
and chemical analysis (HS 7304.19.10; 7304.19.30; 7304.23.00;
7304.29.10; 7304.29.30; 7304.31.80; 7304.39.58; 7304.39.92;
7304.39.93; 7304.51.89; 7304.59.92; 7304.59.93) from Belarus


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/EEC,
14 October 2011




EU Temporary suspension of import tariffs (to zero) on certain cereals,
i.e. common wheat of low and medium quality (HS 1001.90.99),
and feed barley (HS 1003.00), for all imports under reduce-duty
tariff quotas (2011-12 marketing year)


Commission
Implementing
Regulation No. 633/2011
(29 June 2011)


Effective
1 July 2011 to
31 December 2011


EU Termination on 8 July 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
coumarin (HS 2932.21.00) from China (imposed on 4 April 1999),
India (imposed on 9 May 2002), Thailand (imposed on
13 December 2004), Indonesia and Malaysia (imposed on
10 November 2006)


Commission
Implementing
Regulation No. 655/2011
(28 June 2011)




EU Termination on 13 July 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
potassium chloride (HS 3104.20.10; 3104.20.50; 3104.20.90;
3105.20.10; 3105.20.90; 3105.60.90; 3105.90.91; 3105.90.99)
from Belarus and the Russian Federation (imposed on
24 October 1992)


Commission Notice
2011/C 206/10
(12 July 2011)




EU Initiation on 28 July 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of fabrics of woven or stitched or woven and stitched
continuous filament glass fibre rovings, excluding products which
are impregnated or pre-impregnated (pre-preg), and excluding
open mesh fabrics with cells with a size of more than 1.8 mm in
both length and width and weighing more than 35 g/m2
(HS 7019.39.00; 7019.40.00; 7019.90.99) from China


Commission Notice
2011/C 222/12
(28 July 2011)




EU Initiation on 29 July 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of tartaric acid (HS 2918.12.00) from China, limited to
one producer (Hangzhou Bioking Biochemical Engineering Co.
Ltd.)


Commission Notice
2011/C 223/08
(29 July 2011)




EU Termination on 10 August 2011 (without measure) of anti-
dumping investigation on imports of Tris (2-chloro-1-methylethyl)
phosphate "TCPP" (HS 2919.90.00) from China (initiated on
23 July 2010)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/209/EEC,
28 March 2011 and
Commission Decision
2011/498/EU
(9 August 2011)




EU Termination on 11 August 2011 of countervailing duties on
imports of certain broad spectrum antibiotics, namely amoxicillin
trihydrate, ampicillin trihydrate and cefalexin not put up in
measured doses or in forms or packing for retail sale
(HS 2941.10.00; 2941.90.00) from India (imposed on
9 October 1998)


Commission
Implementing
Regulation No. 803/2011
(4 August 2011)




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 35 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


EU Initiation on 12 August 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of aluminium radiators and elements or sections of which
such radiator is composed, whether or not such elements or
sections are assembled in blocks, excluding radiators and elements
and sections thereof of the electrical type (HS 7615.19.10;
7615.19.90; 7616.99.10; 7616.99.90) from China


Commission Notice
2011/C 236/14
(12 August 2011)




EU Termination on 26 August 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports
of silicon carbide "SiC" (HS 2849.20.00) from China (imposed on
25 August 2006)


Commission Notice
2011/C 47/05
(25 August 2011)




EU Termination on 1 September 2011 of anti-dumping duties on
imports of certain side-by-side refrigerators, i.e. combined
refrigerator-freezers of a capacity exceeding 400 litres, with the
freezer and refrigerator compartments placed side-by-side
(HS 8418.10.20) from Korea, Rep. of (imposed on
25 August 2006)


Commission Notice
2011/C 255/06
(31 August 2011)




EU Termination on 2 September 2011 of anti-dumping duties on
imports of castings of non-malleable cast iron and spheroidal
graphite cast iron (ductile iron) of a kind used to cover and/or to
give access to ground or sub-surface systems, and parts thereof,
whether or not machined, coated or painted or fitted with other
materials, excluding fire hydrants (HS 7325.10.50; 7325.10.92;
7325.10.99; 7325.99.10) from China (imposed on 29 July 2005)


Council Implementing
Regulation No. 871/2011
(26 August 2011)




EU Termination on 1 October 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of graphite electrodes of a kind used for
electric furnaces, with an apparent density of 1.5g/cm3 or more and
an electrical resistance of 7 µΩ.m or less (HS 8545.11.00;
8545.90.90) from China (initiated on 17 December 2010)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/209/EEC,
28 March 2011 and
Commission Decision
2011/642/EU
(29 September 2011)




India Import prohibition on acetate tow (HS 5502.00.10) and filter rod
(HS 56), with some exceptions such as for the manufacture of
pharmaceutical products


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Initiation on 23 May 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of grinding media balls (excluding forged grinding media
balls) (HS 7325.91.00) from China and Thailand


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/IND,
7 October 2011




India Termination on 25 May 2011 (without measure) of anti-dumping
investigation on imports of polypropylene "homo-polymers and
co-polymers of propylene" (HS 3902.10.00; 3902.30.00) from
Korea, Rep. of; Chinese Taipei; and the United States (initiated on
10 February 2010)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/IND,
7 October 2011




India Exports of organic sugar (HS 17) (under a quota of 10,000
MT/year) exempted from the "requirement of obtaining release
order"


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Initiation on 13 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of digital offset printing plates (HS 3701.30.00;
3704.00.90; 3705.10.00; 7606.91.91; 7606.92.90; 8442.50.20)
from China and Japan


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/IND,
7 October 2011



India Extension on 22 June 2011 of the Duty Entitlement Pass Book


(DEPB) scheme granting financial export incentives (tax rebates)
mainly for textiles, leather and jute sectors


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Scheme terminated
on
30 September 2011


India Decrease of import tariffs (from 7.5% to 5%) for certain petroleum
oils (HS 2710; 2711; 2712; 2713; 2714; 2715)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Termination on 7 July 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
hydrofluoric acid (HS 2811.11.00) from China (imposed on
28 March 2002)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Further extension of the authorization to export certain wheat
products, i.e. wheat, flour (maida), semolina (rava/sirgi),
wholemeal atta and resultant atta (HS 1101) (subjected to a quota
of 650,000 tonnes) (first extension was on 18 May 2010 up to
31 March 2011)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective
3 July 2009 to
31 March 2012


India Initiation on 21 July 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of plain gypsum plaster boards (HS 6809.11.00;
6809.19.00; 6809.99.00) from China, Indonesia, Thailand, and the
United Arab Emirates


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 36 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


India Exports of cotton (HS 5201; 5202; 5203) for the 2010-11 season
subjected to a temporary export cap of 550,000 bales (55 lakh). On
9 June 2011 the cap threshold was increased by 100,000 bales
except for cotton waste including yarn waste and garneted stock
(HS 5202). Elimination of the export cap in October 2011


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Increase of the minimum import price threshold (from US$50/m2
c.i.f. to US$60/m2 c.i.f.) to freely import worked monumental or
building stone (except slate) and articles thereof (other than goods
of heading HS 6801); mosaic cubes and the like, of natural stone
(including slate), whether or not on a backing; artificially coloured
granules, chippings and powder, of natural stone (including slate)
(HS 6802.10.00; 6802.21.10; 6802.21.20; 6802.21.90; 6802.91.00;
6802.92.00)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Introduction of import licensing requirements on marble and
travertine - crude or roughly trimmed and merely cut, by sawing or
otherwise, into blocks of a rectangular (including squares) shape
(HS 2515.11.00; 2515.12.10)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective financial
year 2011-12


India Initiation on 16 August 2011 of safeguard investigation on imports
of phthalic anhydride (HS 2917.35.00)


WTO documents
G/SG/N/6/IND/29,
18 August 2011 and
G/SG/N/7/IND/9,
4 October 2011


Affirmative
preliminary
determination


India Elimination on 9 September 2011 of export ban on wheat
(HS 1001.10; 1001.10.90; 1001.90; 1001.90.20; 1001.90.39) and
non Basmati rice (HS 1006.10.90; 1006.20.00; 1006.30.10;
1006.30.90; 1006.40.00) (imposed in October 2007)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Increase of the tariff rate quota (from 30,000 MT to 50,000 MT)
for skimmed milk (HS 0402.10; 0402.21.00)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




India Minimum export price "MEP" (US$475/MT) on onions (HS 0703) Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective
20 September 2011


India Further extension of the reduction of import tariffs on raw sugar
and white refined sugar (HS 1701.19.10; 1701.99.90)


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective until
1 December 2011


India Guidelines from the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
providing that project developers "are expected to procure their
project components from domestic manufacturers, as far as
possible". For photovoltaic projects based on crystalline silicon
technology, the guidelines require that all project developers uses
modules manufactured in India; for such projects selected in
FY 2011-12, developers must use both modules and cells
manufactured in India. For projects based on solar thermal
technology, the guidelines require 30% local content in all plants
and installations (under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar
Mission - Batch 1 and 2)


WTO document
G/TRIMS/W/91,
4 October 2011




India Reintroduction of duty drawback on cotton yarn (HS 5205; 5206;
5207) exports


Permanent Delegation of
India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective
1 October 2011


Indonesia Temporary elimination (from 5% to zero) of import tariffs on 182
raw materials and capital goods tariff lines (HS 1507; 2710; 2805;
2810; 2818; 2822; 2823; 2825; 2901; 2902; 2903; 2905; 2906;
2907; 2909; 2912; 2916; 2917; 2918; 2929; 2932; 2933; 2934;
3203; 3204; 3402; 3403; 3811; 3907; 3908; 8408; 8414; 8421;
8436; 8442; 8443; 8444; 8445; 8446; 8447; 8448; 8449; 8450;
8451; 8452; 8453; 8475; 8477; 8504; 8505; 8522; 8532; 8533;
8536; 8540; 8544; 8901; 8904; 8905; 9002; 9007; 9022)


Finance Minister
Regulation
No. 80/PMK.011/2011
(26 April 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Indonesia Temporary increase (from 5% to 10%) of import tariffs on
8 consumer goods tariff lines (HS 1604.12.10; 1604.13.11;
1604.14.10; 1604.15.10; 1704.10.00; 1704.90.10; 1704.90.20;
1704.90.90)


Finance Minister
Regulation
No. 80/PMK.011/2011
(26 April 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 37 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Indonesia Termination on 16 June 2011 (without measure) of safeguard
investigation on imports of polypropylene in granule form
products (HS 3902.10.20) (initiated on 26 April 2011)


WTO document
G/SG/N/9/IDN/4,
23 June 2011




Indonesia Initiation on 21 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of ceramic tableware (HS 6911.10.00; 6911.90.00;
6912.00.00) from China


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/IDN,
14 October 2011




Indonesia Initiation on 24 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of cold rolled coil/sheet (HS 7209.16.00; 7209.17.00;
7209.18.90; 7209.26.00; 7209.27.00; 7209.28.90; 7209.90.90;
7211.23.20; 7211.23.90; 7211.29.20; 7211.29.90; 7211.92.10;
7211.90.90) from China; Japan; Korea, Rep. of; Chinese Taipei;
and Viet Nam


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/IDN,
14 October 2011




Indonesia Initiation on 22 August 2011 of safeguard investigation on imports
of articles of iron or steel wire of single or double coil with a
diameter of 2 mm to 5 mm, in the form of hexagon with size of
50 mm to 120 mm, plated with zinc or plastic polyvinyl chloride,
with the shape of box or cylinder or mesh (HS 7326.20.90)


WTO document
G/SG/N/6/IDN/15,
23 August 2011




Indonesia Temporary revised import and export control procedures for
animals and animal products (HS Chapters 01; 02; 04; 05; 16)


Permanent Delegation of
Indonesia to the WTO
(3 October 2011)


Effective
1 October 2011


Indonesia Regulation facilitating customs procedures for business
companies, entities, or contractors established in Free Trade Zones


Permanent Delegation of
Indonesia to the WTO
(3 October 2011)




Korea, Rep.
of


Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to zero) on certain products,
i.e. chicken (HS 0207.12; 0207.14) (quota 50,000 tonnes); cows
(HS 0102.90) (quota 10,000 heads); processed dairy cream
(HS 0401.30) (quota 1,500 tonnes); cream cheese (HS 0406.10)
(quota 1,200 tonnes); gouda cheese (HS 0406.90) (quota 1,000
tonnes); pork (HS 0203.90) (quota 20,000 tonnes); millet alcohol
(HS 2207.10) (quota 160,000 kg/l); rice brain oil (HS 1515.90);
processed chocolates (HS 1806.20); recycled or semi-synthetic
filament (HS 5403.10; 5403.31; 5403.32; 5403.41); flour (HS
1101.00); (from 21% to 8%) raisins (HS 0806.20); and (from 10%
to 5%) manioc chips for alcohol production (HS 0714.10) (quota
100,000 tonnes)


Permanent Delegation of
Korea to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Korea, Rep.
of


Termination on 15 May 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
benzoyl peroxide (HS 2916.32) from China (imposed on
16 May 2008)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/KOR,
23 September 2011




Korea, Rep.
of


Termination on 2 September 2011 of anti-dumping duties on
imports of titanium dioxide (HS 2823.00) from China (imposed
on 2 March 2005)


Permanent Delegation of
Korea to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Korea, Rep.
of


Temporary elimination of import tariffs on malt (HS 1107.10;
1107.20) and barley (HS 1003.00)


Permanent Delegation of
Korea to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Mexico Trade facilitation measures on conformity assessment procedures
on telecom equipment


Permanent Delegation of
Mexico to the WTO
(3 October 2011)


Effective
10 June 2011


Mexico Initiation on 8 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on imports
of co-axial cable whether or not fitted with conductors
(HS 8544.20.01; 8544.20.02; 8544.20.99) from China


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/MEX,
29 September 2011




Mexico Initiation on 13 July 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of "Amoxicilina trihidratada" - penicillins and their
derivatives with a penicillanic acid structure; salts thereof
(HS 2941.10.12) from China and India


Permanent Delegation of
Mexico to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Mexico Initiation on 13 July 2011 of countervailing investigation on
imports of "Amoxicilina trihidratada" - penicillins and their
derivatives with a penicillanic acid structure; salts thereof
(HS 2941.10.12) from China and India


Permanent Delegation of
Mexico to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Mexico Initiation on 11 October 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of uncoated paper and paperboard weighing 40 g/m2 or
more but not more than 150 g/m2, in sheets with one side not
exceeding 435 mm and the other side not exceeding 297 mm in the
unfolded state (HS 4802.56.01) from Brazil


Permanent Delegation of
Mexico to the WTO
(14 October 2011)



Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 38 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Russian
Federation


Export ban on certain crops, i.e. wheat (HS 1001.10), barley (HS
1003), rye (HS 1002), maize (HS 1005) (originally implemented
15 August 2010)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


The ban was lifted
on 1 July 2011


Russian
Federation


Temporary import ban on fresh vegetables from the EU Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


The ban was lifted
on 9 August 2011


Russian
Federation


Temporary import quotas on ozone-depleting substances
"halogenated derivatives of hydrocarbons" (HS 2903.49.10)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 August 2011 to
31 December 2011


Russian
Federation


Introduction of new determination of export tariffs on nickel
(HS 7502.10.00) depending on world market prices


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
28 May 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Reduction of import tariffs (from 10% to 5%) on monofilament
(HS 5404)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
13 May 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Temporary elimination of import tariffs (to zero) on certain
synthetic filament yarn (HS 5402.20.00) and fresh or chilled fish
"capelin" (HS 0302.69.99)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
19 May 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Elimination of import tariffs (from 5% to zero) on oilcake and
other solid residues, whether or not ground or in the form of
pellets, resulting from the extraction of soya-bean oil
(HS 2304.00.00)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
31 July 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Temporary elimination of import tariffs (to zero) on natural
calcium phosphates, natural aluminium calcium phosphates, and
phosphatic chalk (HS 2510.20.00)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
10 June 2011 to
31 December 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Elimination of import tariffs (to zero) on crude oil
(HS 2709.00.90)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
28 June 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Temporary increase of import tariffs (5%) on multi-ply paper and
paperboard with each layer bleached (HS 4810.92.10)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 September 2011 to
29 August 2012


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Increase of import tariffs (from zero to 5%) on continuous-action
elevators and conveyors for goods and materials, specially
designed for underground (HS 8428.31.00); and mobile hydraulic-
powered mine roof supporters (HS 8479.89.30)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 September 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Elimination of import tariffs (to zero) on tractors, used for laying
skiing tracks (HS 8701.30.10)


Permanent Delegations
of Belarus and the
Russian Federation to the
United Nations
(3 October 2011)


Effective
1 September 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Increase of import tariffs (from zero to 5%) on certain agricultural
machinery, i.e. disc harrows (HS 8432.21.00; 8432.30.19); and
pick-up balers (HS 8433.40.10)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 September 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Temporary elimination of import tariffs (to zero) on certain types
of puree and concentrates used for the production of juices
(HS 2007.99.57; 2007.99.98; 2008.50.61; 2008.70.61)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 September 2011 to
31 May 2012


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Increase of import tariffs (from zero to 5%) on sprayers and
powder distributors designed to be mounted on or drawn by
tractors (HS 8424.81.91); beet-topping machines and beet
harvesters (HS 8433.53.30); and other harvesting machinery
(HS 8433.59.80)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 September 2011


Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 39 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Introduction of a specific import tariff (€5/unit (US$ 7/unit)) in
replacement of ad valorem import duty (10%) on liquid-filled
radiators (HS 8516.29.10)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 September 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Introduction of import/export ban/restriction on raw, tanned and
dressed fur skin (or piece/cuttings thereof) of harp seal and their
white coat pups (HS 4301.80.99; 4301.90.00; 4302.19.41;
4302.19.49; 4302.20.00; 4302.30.51; 4302.30.55)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
20 August 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Introduction of a temporary specific import tariff (safeguard)
(US$282.4/tonne) on certain types of fasteners (bolts and nuts)
(HS 7318.15.81; 7318.15.89; 7318.15.90; 7318.16.91; 7318.16.99;
7318.21.00)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
20 August 2011 to
17 March 2014


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Introduction of a temporary specific import tariff (safeguard)
(US$1.4/kg) on tableware of stainless steel (HS 8211.91.30;
8215.20.10; 8215.99.10)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
20 August 2011 to
26 December 2012


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Introduction of a temporary specific import tariff (safeguard) on
tubes of stainless steel with an external diameter not exceeding
426 mm (HS 7304.11.10; 7304.11.30; 7304.11.90; 7304.41.00;
7304.49.10; 7304.49.92; 7304.49.99; 7306.11.11; 7306.11.19;
7306.11.90; 7306.40.20; 7306.40.80) (9.9% but not less than
US$1,500/tonne)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
20 August 2011 to
1 November 2012


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Elimination of import and export licensing requirement on drugs
used in veterinary medicines (HS 2922; 2930; 2932; 2936; 2937;
2938; 2939; 2941; 3001; 3002; 3003; 3004; 3006; 3401; 3402;
3808; 3822)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 October 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Update of the import/export licensing requirement list of narcotics
psychotropic agents and their precursors resulting in the
incorporation of 22 HS tariff lines (HS 1209; 1211; 2806; 2807;
2812; 2902; 2903; 2905; 2912; 2915; 2916; 2920; 2921; 2922;
2924; 2926; 2932; 2933; 2934) and the removal of 14 HS tariff
lines (HS 2804; 2806; 2807; 2841; 2909; 2914; 2915; 2916; 2922;
2924, 2932; 2939; 3003, 3004)


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)


Effective
1 October 2011


Belarus,
Kazakhstan,
Russian
Federation


Creation of new tariff lines (HS 3104; 3214; 4011; 4202; 7220;
7607; 8105; 8430; 8462; 8517; 8528; 8905) in some cases
resulting in an increase of import tariffs and other cases in a
decrease of import tariffs


Permanent Delegation of
the Russian Federation to
the United Nations
(17 October 2011)




South Africa Termination on 6 May 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
biaxially orientated polymers of propylene (BOPP) (HS 3920.20)
from Brazil (imposed on 13 April 2007)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ZAF,
28 July 2011




South Africa Revised preferential procurement regulations granting preferences
for local products and Broad-based Black Economic
Empowerment "B-BBEE" scheme


Regulation Gazette No.
9544 - Regulasiekoerant
Vol. 552 - No. 34350 (8
June 2011)


Effective
7 December 2011


South Africa Termination on 17 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
lysine (HS 2922.41) from the United States (imposed on
25 January 2002)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ZAF,
28 July 2011




South Africa Termination on 17 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
carbon black (HS 2803) from Thailand (imposed on
13 October 2000)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ZAF,
28 July 2011




South Africa Elimination of the temporary rebate provision (full duty of 55%
less 20%) on imports of canned pineapples (HS 2008.20)
(originally imposed in May 2008). Imports from Southern African
Development Community (SADC) members exempted


Report No. 373 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission
(20 June 2011)


Effective
20 June 2011


South Africa Creation of a new tariff line (HS 2923.21.20) with an import tariff
of zero, resulting in a decrease of import tariffs (from 15%) on
bags, of low-density polyethylene, of a size not exceeding
15 cm x 23 cm, with no opening and having one perforated edge
incorporating a plastic covered wire seal


Report No. 374 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission
(4 July 2011)




South Africa Initiation on 24 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of frozen chicken meat, whole bird and boneless cuts and
offal "species Gallus Domesticus" (HS 0207.12.90; 0207.14.10)
from Brazil


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/ZAF,
28 July 2011




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 40 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


South Africa Increase of import tariffs (from zero to 15%) on sewing thread, of
synthetic filaments (HS 5401.10). Imports from Southern African
Development Community (SADC) members exempted


Report No. 367 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission -
Government Gazette
No. 34463 (No. R.593)
(22 July 2011)




South Africa Elimination of import tariffs (to zero) on dehydrated castor oil for
use in the manufacture of alkyd resins in primary form
(HS 1518.00.90)


Report No. 370 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission -
Government Gazette
No. 34511 (No. R.644)
(12 August 2011)




South Africa Initiation on 23 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of frit (HS 3207.40) from Brazil


Notice No. 644 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission
(23 September 2011)




South Africa Initiation on 23 September 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of screw studding (rods threaded throughout) of steel and
of stainless steel "threaded rods" (HS 7318.15.41; 7318.15.35)
from China


Notice No. 647 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission
(23 September 2011)




South Africa Reduction of import tariffs on nonwovens for the manufacture of
disposable napkins for babies (HS 5603)


Report No. 369 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission -
Government Gazette
No. 34541 (No. R.673)
(26 August 2011)




Turkey Termination on 4 May 2011 (expiry without review) of anti-
dumping duties on imports of universal AC. DC motors of an
output exceeding 37.5 w (HS 8501.20.00) from China (imposed on
4 May 2006)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/TUR,
12 September 2011




Turkey Additional increase of import tariffs on meat (HS 0201; 0202)
from 45% to 60% (on 14 May 2011), and from 60% to 75% (on
2 July 2011)


Permanent Delegation of
Turkey to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




Turkey Termination on 18 May 2011 (expiry without review) of anti-
dumping duties on imports of polyester flat yarn (HS 5402.47)
from Korea, Rep. of (imposed on 30 November 1999)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/TUR,
12 September 2011




Turkey Initiation on 15 July 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on
imports of slide fasteners (HS 9607.11; 9607.19) from Indonesia
(possible circumvention of anti-dumping measures of imports from
China imposed in March 2005)


Permanent Delegation of
Turkey to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




Turkey Reduction of import tariffs (from 30% to 15%) on bovine meat
(HS 0102.90.71)


Permanent Delegation of
Turkey to the WTO
(5 October 2011)


Effective
29 July 2011


Turkey Termination on 7 September 2011 of anti-dumping duties on
imports of fittings (HS 7307.19) from Montenegro and Serbia
(imposed on 7 September 2006)


Permanent Delegation of
Turkey to the WTO
(5 October 2011)




United States Termination on 5 May 2011 of countervailing duties on imports of
stainless steel plate in coils (HS 7219.11; 7219.12; 7219.31;
7219.90; 7220.11; 7220.20; 7220.90) from Belgium (imposed on
11 May 1999)


WTO document
G/SCM/N/228/USA,
28 September 2011



United States National Dairy Promotion and Research Programme introducing


an import assessment fee (US$0.075/hundredweight) of local or
imported milk or equivalent (265 HS tariff lines from Chapters 04;
15; 17; 18; 19; 21; 22; 35)


Permanent Delegation of
the United States to the
WTO (11 May 2011)


Effective
1 August 2011


United States Termination on 20 May 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
purified carboxymethylcellulose (HS 3912.31) from Mexico and
Sweden (imposed on 11 July 2005)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/USA,
30 September 2011


Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 41 -


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


United States Initiation on 8 June 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on imports
of "high pressure steel cylinders", seamless steel cylinders
designed for storage or transport of compressed or liquefied gas
(HS 7311.00.00) from China


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/USA,
30 September 2011


Affirmative
preliminary
determination by
USITC on
1 July 2011


United States Initiation on 8 June 2011 of countervailing investigation on
imports of "high pressure steel cylinders", seamless steel cylinders
designed for storage or transport of compressed or liquefied gas
(HS 7311.00.00) from China


WTO document
G/SCM/N/228/USA,
28 September 2011


Affirmative
preliminary
determination by
USITC on
1 July 2011


United States Termination on 21 June 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of
hot-rolled, flat-rolled carbon quality steel products (HS 7208.10;
7208.25; 7208.26; 7208.27; 7208.36; 7208.37; 7208.38; 7208.39;
7208.40; 7208.53; 7208.54; 7208.90; 7210.70; 7211.14; 7211.19;
7212.40; 7212.50; 7225.11; 7225.19; 7225.30; 7225.40; 7225.99;
7226.11; 7226.19; 7226.91; 7226.99) from Brazil (imposed on
12 March 2002) and Japan (imposed on 29 June 1999)


WTO document
G/ADP/N/216/USA,
30 September 2011



United States Termination on 21 June 2011 of countervailing duties on imports


of hot-rolled, flat-rolled carbon quality steel products (HS
7208.10; 7208.25; 7208.26; 7208.27; 7208.36; 7208.37; 7208.38;
7208.39; 7208.40; 7208.53; 7208.54; 7208.90; 7210.70; 7211.14;
7211.19; 7212.40; 7212.50; 7225.11; 7225.19; 7225.30; 7225.40;
7225.99; 7226.11; 7226.19; 7226.91; 7226.99) from Brazil
(imposed on 17 September 2004)


WTO document
G/SCM/N/228/USA,
28 September 2011



United States Termination on 15 July 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports of


ball bearings (HS 3926.90; 4016.93; 6909.19; 8432.20; 8431.39;
8482.10; 8482.80; 8482.91; 8482.99; 8483.20; 8483.30; 8483.50;
8483.90; 8708.30; 8708.40; 8708.50; 8708.60; 8708.70; 8708.80;
8708.93; 8708.94; 8708.95; 8708.99; 8803.10; 8803.20; 8803.30;
8803.90) from Japan and the United Kingdom (imposed on
15 May 1989)


Permanent Delegation of
the United States to the
WTO (14 October 2011)



United States Termination on 10 August 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports


of certain stainless steel sheet and strip in coils (HS 7219.13.00;
7219.14.00; 7219.32.00; 7219.33.00; 7219.34.00; 7219.35.00;
7219.90.00; 7220.12.10; 7220.12.50; 7220.20.10; 7220.20.60;
7220.20.70; 7220.20.80; 7220.20.90; 7220.90.00) from Germany,
Italy, and Mexico (imposed on 27 July 1999)


Permanent Delegation of
the United States to the
WTO (14 October 2011)



United States Initiation on 10 August 2011 of anti-dumping investigation on


imports of large power transformers (HS 8504.23.00) from Korea,
Rep. of


Permanent Delegation of
the United States to the
WTO (14 October 2011)




United States Termination on 31 August 2011 of anti-dumping duties on imports
of certain stainless steel plates in coils (HS 7219.13; 7219.14;
7219.32; 7219.33; 7219.34; 7219.35; 7219.90; 7220.12; 7220.20;
7220.20.90) from Italy (imposed on 21 May 1999)


Permanent Delegation of
the United States to the
WTO (14 October 2011)




United States Termination on 15 September 2011 (no participation by domestic
parties in SNR) of anti-dumping duties on imports of ball bearings
(HS 3926.90; 4016.93; 6909.19; 8432.20; 8431.39; 8482.10;
8482.80; 8482.91; 8482.99; 8483.20; 8483.30; 8483.50; 8483.90;
8708.30; 8708.40; 8708.50; 8708.60; 8708.70; 8708.80; 8708.93;
8708.94; 8708.95; 8708.99; 8803.10; 8803.20; 8803.30; 8803.90)
from France, Germany and Italy (imposed on 15 May 1989)


Permanent Delegation of
the United States to the
WTO (14 October 2011)



United States Termination on 16 September 2011 of anti-dumping duties on


imports of polyethylene terephthalate "PET" film sheet, and strip
(HS 3920.62) from Korea, Rep. of (imposed on 5 June 1991)


Permanent Delegation of
the United States to the
WTO (14 October 2011)




Annex 1 (cont'd)






- 42 -

NON-VERIFIED INFORMATION


Country/
Member


State
Measure Source/Date Status


Argentina Import/export compensation agreements with importers under
which importers commit to export the same value of products
made in Argentina. For example, compensation agreements "one-
to-one" signed between the Ministry of Industry and 17 car
manufacturers (Ford, Chery, General Motors, Volkswagen,
Mercedes Benz, Porsche, Fiat, PSA, Alfa Romeo, Hyundai, Kia,
Renault, Nissan, Subaru, BMW, and Mitsubishi), and with
John Deere machinery manufacturer


Ministerio de Industria
press reports, viewed at:
http://www.industria.gob
.ar/?p=8316 and
http://www.industria.gob
.ar/?p=8636




Australia Export ban on live cattle to Indonesia The Australian
(8 June 2011) and BBC
News (6 July 2011)


The ban was lifted
on 6 July 2011


Australia Elimination of export tariffs on wheat Agra Europe (23
September 2011)


Effective 30
September 2012


Brazil Non automatic import licensing requirements for imports of certain
products, i.e. vehicles, auto-parts, paper products, chocolates,
sweets, biscuits, shoes, and tyres


La nación
(16 May 2011) and
CRONISTA.COM
(18 October 2011)




China Decrease of import tariffs on certain luxury goods, i.e. cosmetics,
cigarettes, and alcohol


China Daily -
Hong Kong Edition
(28 June 2011)




China Temporary import duty exemption for cartoon companies
importing certain cartoon industrial products


GTA Measure No. 2486
(1 July 2011)




China Temporary reduction of import tariffs (to zero) on certain products,
i.e. nuclear reactors, boilers, machinery and mechanical
appliances; parts thereof; electrical machinery and equipment;
ships, boats and floating structures; and optical, photographic,
cinematographic, checking, precision, medical or surgical
instruments and apparatus (HS 8401.40.90; 8406.82.00;
8413.70.10; 8413.70.90; 8413.70.99; 8413.91.00; 8414.00.90;
8414.80.90; 8419.40.90; 8419.50.00; 8419.89.10; 8421.29.90;
8426.99.90; 8428.90.90; 8445.11.11; 8445.11.12; 8445.12.10;
8445.12.20; 8445.12.90; 8445.13.10; 8445.13.21; 8445.19.00;
8445.20.41; 8448.31.00; 8448.32.00; 8448.39.90; 8471.49.91;
8479.89.99; 8481.40.00; 8501.53.00; 8504.40.20; 8504.40.90;
8536.50.00; 8537.10.90; 8544.49.21; 8544.60.12; 89; 9025.19.10;
9032.81.00)


GTA Measure No. 2684
(18 August 2011)
referring to Notification
No. 45/2011 Ministry of
Finance


Effective until
15 August 2011


India New guideline from the Ministry of Communication and IT
regulating government purchases, including "Made in India" clause
requirements, and granting preference (up to 30% price preference)
for local manufactured electronic equipment and IT focused
peripherals. "Made in India" should have a local value addition at
the rate of 25% in the first year of production to reach up to 45%
by the fifth year


ITVARNews.net (20
June 2011)



India On 31 May 2011, the Department of Telecoms (DOT) issued new


licensing regulation amending all prior telecom security-related
policies. Requirements on source code escrow, transfer of
technology, and mandatory contractual terms have been removed.
New DOT regulation requires: (i) mandatory security testing by
Indian laboratories by 2013; (ii) inspection of hardware, software,
design, development, and manufacturing facilities; and (iii)
employment of only residents


Press reports (May 2011)



India Introduction of "Registration Certificate" for exports of cotton


(HS 5201; 5203) granted by the Regional Authority. Exports of
cotton also subject to a bank guarantee (2.5% of the value
equivalent of the quantity for which the certificate is being applied,
or for Rs 100,000, whichever is more)


Notification No. 63 (RE-
2010)/2009-2014
Ministry of Commerce
& Industry - Department
of Commerce
(4 August 2011)




India New recommendation by the Telecom Regulatory Authority
stipulating that at least one-third of the purchase by government
entities of computers and other electronic equipment be reserved
for local manufactured items


HT Media Limited
(14 September)




Indonesia Reduction of import quotas for beef (from 73,000 tonnes in 2010
to 50,000 tonnes in 2011) and cattle


AgraEurope
(4 March 2011)




Annex 1 (cont'd)




- 43 -


Country/
Member


State
Measure Source/Date Status


Indonesia Elimination of import tariff on soyabean oils Grain Market Report
GMR No. 411
(26 May 2011)




Indonesia Reduction of export tariffs (from 25% to 22.5%) on crude palm oil Grain Market Report
GMR No. 415
(22 September 2011)


Effective
1 October 2011


Indonesia New import licensing requirements for fish and fish products Press reports referring to
Decree No. 17/2010




Indonesia Import ban on dory fish fillets Press reports referring to
Decree No. 15/2011




Indonesia Temporary export tariff on cocoa Press reports (22 July
2011) referring to
Regulation No. 19/2011


Effective 22 July
2011 until end
August 2011


South Africa Increase of import tariffs (from zero to 10%) on artificial turf
(HS 9506.99.20)


Report No. 376 of 2011 -
International Trade
Administration
Commission -
Government Gazette
No. 34671 (No. R.844)
(14 October 2011)


Effective
14 October 2011


Turkey Amendments to the Public Procurement Law changing the
preferential margins applicable to local or foreign bidders
(15% preference margin for locally produced goods)


Press reports
(February 2011)




Turkey Introduction of export registration requirement for certain
products, i.e. recovered (waste and scrap) paperboard, and
aluminium waste and scrap


Press reports
(21 April 2011)











ANNEX 2


G20 - General Economic Stimulus Measures1
(May 2011 - mid October 2011)



VERIFIED INFORMATION


Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Argentina Aid programme "Programa de Parques
Industriales del Bicentenario" for infrastructure
projects. The programme also includes funds
(Arg$300,000 (US$ 71,352)) for preferential
credit for SMEs


Permanent Delegation of Argentina to the
WTO (17 October 2011)




Brazil Special Regime of Reimbursement of Duties to
Exporting Companies "REINTEGRA",
reimbursing residual duties in the production
chain


Permanent Delegation of Brazil to the WTO
(30 September 2011)




Brazil Broad programme of industrial development
support under the "Plano Brazil Maior". Measures
already implemented in the areas of internal taxes,
government procurement, trade facilitation and
assistance measures


Permanent Delegation of Brazil to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




China Termination on 30 September 2011 of
government support policy for energy efficient
vehicles. A new policy is in place setting higher
standards on technology and fuel consumption


Permanent Delegation of China to the WTO
(5 October 2011)


New policy
effective
1 October 2011


China Elimination of financial aid and local content
preferences for energy related equipment (wind
turbines)


Permanent Delegation of China to the WTO
(17 October 2011)




EU Exceptional support measures (not to exceed
€227 million (US$ 317.3 million)), for producers
of certain fruits and vegetables, i.e. tomatoes,
lettuces, cucumbers, sweet peppers, courgettes
due to E. coli


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the
EU Delegation. Commission Implementing
Regulation No. 585/2011 (17 June 2011) as
amended by Regulation No. 786/2011
(2 August 2011)


Effective
26 May 2011 to
30 June 2011


EU Extension of the short-term export credit
insurance scheme for certain Member States
(Belgium "BELGACAP" (overall budget
€300 million (US$ 419.3 million)), Denmark, and
Luxembourg (overall budget €25 million
(US$ 34.9 million)))


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the EU
Delegation. EU State Aids SA. 32159 (10/N)
(30 May 2011), SA. 32573 (11/N) (13 July
2011), and SA. 32846 (11/N) (27 May 2011)


Effective for
Belgium and
Luxembourg until
31 December 2011
and for Denmark
until
31 December 2012


Austria Aid scheme (overall budget €70 million
(US$ 97.8 million)) through the provision of risk
capital guarantee for all sectors


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the
EU Delegation. EU State Aid
SA. 32780 (11/N) (26 July 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2013


Denmark Aid scheme (overall budget DKr 3 billion
(US$ 551 million) and annual budget DKr
350 million (US$ 64.3 million)) through the
provision of direct grant for all sectors


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the
EU Delegation. EU State Aid
SA. 22116 (11/N) (20 April 2011)


Effective until
1 February 2017


Denmark Aid scheme (overall budget DKr 75 million
(US$ 18.8 million)) through the provision of
guarantee for SMEs


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the
EU Delegation. EU State Aid
SA. 33022 (11/N) (4 August 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2015


France Aid scheme (€400 million (US$ 559 million))
through the provision of risk capital for young
innovative enterprises (Fonds national
d'amorçage)


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the EU
Delegation. EU State Aid SA. 31730 (11/N)
(20 April 2011)


Effective until
2030


Annex 2 (cont'd)



1 The inclusion of any measure in this table implies no judgement by the WTO Secretariat on whether


or not such measure, or its intent, is protectionist in nature. Moreover, nothing in the table implies any
judgement, either direct or indirect, on the consistency of any measure referred to with the provisions of any
WTO agreement or such measure's impact on, or relationship with, the global financial crisis.




- 45 -




Country/
Member
State


Measure Source/Date Status


Greece Temporary state aid scheme related to loan
guarantees for companies encountering financing
difficulties as a result of the credit squeeze in the
current economic crisis


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the EU
Delegation. EU State Aid
SA. 32204 (2011/N) (26 July 2011)


Effective
26 July 2011 to
31 December 2011


Latvia Amendment to the temporary framework scheme
(aproved on 19 March 2009) tightening the
conditions of the aid to be granted


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the
EU Delegation. EU State Aid SA. 32051
amending N 506/2009 (23 May 2011)




Luxembourg Temporary aid scheme granting aid in the form of
guarantees


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the
EU Delegation (29 July 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Poland Aid scheme (overall budget Zl 2.7 million
(US$ 849,377)), in the form of rescue aid loan to
transport firms


EU State Aid SA. 32480 (N/11)
(13 July 2011)


Effective
15 October 2010
to 15 April 2011


Poland Aid scheme (overall budget Zl 1.23 million
(US$ 386,938)), in the form of rescue aid loan to
service firms


EU State Aid N 492/10 (24 May 2011) Effective
15 October 2010
to 15 April 2011


Romania Aid scheme (overall budget leu 1.3 billion
(US$ 409 million)), in the form of direct grant for
crop and animal production


EU State Aid SA. 32174 (10/N)
(20 April 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


Spain Extension of the temporary aid scheme (overall
budget €700 million (US$ 978.3 million))
granting aid in the form of guarantees


Public information available on the European
Commission's website transmitted by the
EU Delegation (31 May 2011)


Effective until
31 December 2011


India Focus Market Scheme providing duty credit
equivalent to 3% of f.o.b. value of exports.
110 markets covered under this scheme


Permanent Delegation of India to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Indonesia Programme facilitating the provision of subsidized
fertilizers for the agriculture sector


Permanent Delegation of Indonesia to the
WTO (3 October 2011)




Japan New emergency fund (US$100 billion) through
Japan Bank for International Co-operation to
encourage mergers and acquisitions, and for
SMEs to support exports


Permanent Delegation of Japan to the WTO
(14 October 2011)


Valid for one year


Korea, Rep.
of


Special Act on Fostering and Supporting
Pharmaceutical Industry aiming at providing local
pharmaceutical companies with information on
domestic and overseas pharmaceutical markets,
and rewarding outstanding pharmaceutical
companies


Permanent Delegation of Korea to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Korea, Rep.
of


"Urgent Management Stabilization Fund"
(W 100 billion (US$ 87.3 million)), through
Korea Finance Corporation for SMEs for purchase
of raw materials


Permanent Delegation of Korea to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Korea, Rep.
of


Government programme to enhance global
competitiveness for local auto-parts manufacturers


Permanent Delegation of Korea to the WTO
(14 October 2011)




Russian
Federation


Financial aid for certain sectors, i.e. forestry,
textiles, aircraft industry


Permanent Delegation of the Russian
Federation to the United Nations
(17 October 2011)






NON-VERIFIED INFORMATION


Country/
Member


State
Measure Source/Date Status


Brazil Special credit line through loans granted by
BNDES for local auto-parts producers


Press reports (2 August 2011)


India The Reserve Bank of India restored an interest
subvention (2%) on rupee credit for exporters
from labour-intensive and small-scale industries
(i.e. handicrafts, handlooms, carpets, gems, and
jewellery)


Financial Express (12 October 2011) Effective April 2011
to 31 March 2012


Indonesia Termination of stimulus package adopted in 2009 Press reports (various dates)


_______________




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